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Full text of "Genealogy of the Lewis family in America, from the middle of the seventeenth century down to the present time"

929.2 
L587t 
1154009 GENEALOGY COL-UECTION 



,,'^LLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 00859 1304 



GENEALOGY 



Lewis Family 



IN AMERICA, 



FROM THE MIDDLE OF THE SEl^ENTEENTH CENTURY 
DOWN TO THE PRESENT TIME. 



BY 

WM. TERRELL LEWIS, 
Of Perryville, Winston County, Miss. 



price:, S2.00 



LOUISVILLE, KY.: 
Published by The Courier-Journal Job Printing Co. 

1893. 



Copyrighted 1892. 



ELEOTHOTYPED. PRINTED AND BOUND BY THE 
COURIER-JOURNAL JOS PRINTIHG CO . LOUISVILLE, KV. 



V 1154009 



In iVLcmoriain. 






^eei ^e ^n heaven*" 



Departed this life at his home near Perryville, Miss., 

on the 23d day of January, 1893, in the 

82d year of his age, 

pttUlatn Jewell gctvi$i 

The Author of this " History of the Lewis Family." 



"PiURlNGr a long life, extending over four score years, Mr. Lewis, 
although a frail and delicate man, led an active, useful life. 
He was by occupation land surveyor and planter; and by constant 
exercise in the open air of a genial southern climate, and strictly 
temperate habits, he invigorated his constitution and gained power 
to resist the ordinary ills of the flesh. But when that grim monster 
"La Grippe" seized him with a fatal grasp he was at once pros- 
trated. Old and feeble he gradually sank beneath the ravages of 
the disease and with quiet resignation he endured its racking pains. 
His mind was calm and clear and he saw in death a relief from the 
cares and anxieties of this world and rest for the body. He had 
fought a good fight as a Christian soldier; he had devoted his life 
to the performance of his duty to his God and to his fellow-man, 
and he was not afraid to die. When the Angel of Death came to 
bear his soul away, he called his weeping family to his bed-side 
and in a feeble voice whispered to them his dying words, ' ' meet me 
in heaven.'' 

These last words become an appropriate message from the 
Author of this book to all his friends whose names are herein en- 
rolled. For more than forty years Mr. Lewis was engaged in gather- 
ing the materials for this work. He wrote thousands of letters and 
traveled hundreds of miles. To him it was a labor of love. He 
was proud of his lineage. His descent from the Huguenot brothers, 
who fled from religious persecution in France and found an asylum 
in this land, for whose freedom their sons bravely fought, was not 
his only boast. His researches in the family records and traditions 
disclosed to him the fact that those manl}', noble traits of character 
that so eminently distinguished the Huguenot brothers, were dis- 
tinctly transmitted to their descendants even to the present genera- 
tion, and therefore with high admiration and fraternal love he re- 
garded every one in whose veins the Lewis blood flowed. His 
dream of life was to see this book in print. Alas how sad was his 
disappointment. 

To each of you then, whose names he has, with so much patient 
labor affld carefulness, gathered together from all parts of the United 
States, and perpetuated them in this book, it is fitting that his 
dying words be sent as his meesage from the grave, 

"MEET ME IN HEAVEN." 

T. S. K. 
March, 1893. 



(From the local paper at Perrj-ville, Miss.) 

Sacred to the Memory op William Terrell Lewis. 

William Terrell Lewis, son of Charley Crawford and Elizabeth 
Lewis, of Rutherford, N. C, was born April 15, 1811, four miles 
west of Rutherford, N. C, on the Hickorynut Gap road, on the 
waters of Mountain creek, and died at the home of his son, 0. T. 
Lewis, in Winston count}-, Miss., Monday, January 23, 1893. 

Mr. Lewis was educated in what is known as the old field schools, 
and yet was a man of much more than ordinary intelligence and 
ability. 

Mr. Lewis came to Louisville, Winston county, Miss., on the 15th 
day of November, 1836, and was employed by Lewis & Hudspeth 
as clerk in a dry goods store. He was first elected County Surveyor 
of this county the 5th day of November, 1839, and served off and 
on as such for twenty-two terms. Mr. Lewis was not a man of 
strong physique, yet his strict discipline over himself, and his clear 
comprehension of the law, "be temperate in all things," and with 
all this a kind, generous heart and a good will to all, he was enabled 
to live out a long and useful life here, and has made many happier 
for his having lived. 

In 1861 he was elected a member of the Legislature from this 
county and served one term. 

There was perhaps no one so generally known in Winston county 
as William T. Lewis. No man ever visited more of our homes, 
talked more to our children, or wrote more of our history than 
did he. 

In 1867 he professed faith in Christ and joined the Baptist 
church. 

He was twice married, first to Miss Eliza Jane Steele, of Louis- 
ville, at the residence of Dr. R. D. Brown, September 19, 1848. 
Rev. W. H. Head, of precious memory, officiating. 

Unto his first wife was born all his children, and of this compan- 
ion he was deprived by death Januarj"^ 17, 1867. 

On the 9th day of January, 1868, he was married to Mary Ann 
Norton, who still survives him. 

His home was a happy home, his life a busy life, and while he is 
gone we feel that he still lives, for his works do follow him. 

We commend his wife and children to the mercy of Him who 
said "I will be a Father to the fatherless, and a Husband to the 
widow." J- A. Leech. 



PEEFAOE. 



Were it our fault, we would offer an apology for the many errors 
and omissions doubtless to be found in this little volume ; but we 
have spared no pains nor expense in our efforts to procure every 
name and all the information relative to the Lewis family in America. 
Hundreds to whom we wrote never responded to our interrogatories ; 
and many who did, withheld the information asked at their hands, 
and excused themselves by saying that ' ' they knew but little about 
the family," and " that it looked too much like egotism to speak or 
write eulogistically of themselves. ' ' 

As imperfect as this work may prove to be, perhaps it is better to 
have an imperfect sketch of the family than none at all. 

Having left our paternal home in early life without much knowl- 
edge of the family connection, beyond our father's family, we were 
prompted by the deep and holy regard we entertained for the 
family, to write a few letters of inquiry relative to the different 
branches now scattered throughout the Southern and Western States. 
It was not our purpose at first to write more than a few letters, but 
the more we wrote the deeper we became interested in the subject of 
our inquiry, until we were requested by many of those with whom 
we corresponded to publish in book form the result of our researches. 
In order to comply with that request it became necessary to collect, 
as far as possible, every name and all the information possible a1)0ut 
the family that could be procured. This opened a vast field of labor 
almost too onerous for our undertaking ; but we did not shrink from 
the task, for we have written thousands of letters and collected 
names and information that could not now be obtained, from the fact 
that the persons from whom we received the information have long 
since passed away. We were well aware that many of the family 
possessed great wealth, while others did not ; for that reason wc made 



4 PREB^ACE. 

no inquiry about their property, as it mattered not whetlier they 
were rich or poor, so they were honest, upright, and bore a good 
name. We have distinguished the different generations of the 
family by the letters of the alphabet, thus: A, first generation; B, 
second, etc. 

We hope this little volume may be the means of stimulating the 
rising generation to noble deeds and save them from degradation ; 
and that some enterprising member of the family may continue the 
researches after the scattered and lost members of the family and 
some day publish a new edition of this book, is the earnest desire 
of the AUTHOR. 

Perryville, Miss. 



^ 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



CHAPTER I. 

GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

There is a tradition in the Lewis family in America that the name 
originated in France, and that it was originally spelled "Louis," 
meaning strong or brave. After the family settled in Wales, the 
name being Anglicized, it was changed to ' ' Lewis. ' ' All the Welsh 
Lewises are related, as they sprang from the same original stock. 

About the middle of the seventeenth century four brothers of the 
Lewis family left Wales, viz. : 

A 1. Samuel, went to Portugal; nothing more is known of him. 

A 2. William, died in Ireland. 

A 3. General Robert, died in Gloucester county, Va. ; and 

A 4. John, died in Hanover county, Va. 



A 2. William, one of the Welsh brothers, died in Ireland. He 

married a Miss McClelland and left one son, viz. : 

B 1. Andrew, who married Mary Calhoun, and left issue, viz.: 
C 1. John, born in 1678; married Margaret Lynn. 
C 2. Samuel, born 1680; left no issue. 



C 1. John was born in Ireland, and is styled as Pioneer John 
Lewis by Campbell in his history of Virginia. In 1720 he killed an 
Irish landlord and fled to America, and finally settled near where 
the town of Staunton, in Augusta county, Va., now stands. He 
was tall and of great muscular strength, and was one among the 
best backwoodsmen of his day. When he settled in what is now 
Augusta county, the country was inhabited by Indians. 

Like all pioneer settlers in a new country, he had to fight his way 
with the red men of the forest. He built his house with port-holes 
in it, so that he could successfully contend with the savage tribes 
that infested the country, and with whom he had many a conflict. 
When Augustti county was organized, he was the founder of Staun- 
ton, the county seat, and was one of the flrst magistrates appointed 
in the county by the Governor. The last thirty years of his life were 
devoted to advancing the interests of the little community he founded. 
He died in 1762, thirty years after coming to Augusta, and m his 



6 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

eighty-fourth year. He was buried at Bellefonte, in Augusta county, 
where a plain marble slab marks the spot where his remains repose, 
with the following inscription upon it : 



! "Here lies the remains of 

j JOHN LEWIS, 

: Who slew the Irisli lord, settled Augusta county, 

I Located the town of Staunton, 

I And furnished five sons to figlit the battles of the 

I AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

; He was the son of Andrew Lewis, Esq., and Mary Calhoun, 

■ and was born in Donegal Co., Ireland, 1678, 

I and died in Virginia Feb. 1, 1762. 

I He was a brave man, a true patriot and 

! a firm friend of liberty throughout the world." 

C 1. John Lewis and Margaret Lynn had seven children, viz: 

D 1. Samuel, born in Ireland, 1716; died unmarried. 

D 2. Thomas, born in Ireland, 1718; married Jane Strother. 

D 3. General Andrew, born in Ireland, 1720; married Elizabeth 
Givens. 

D 4. Colonel "William, born in Ireland, 1724; married Ann 
Montgomery. 

D 5. Margaret, born 1726; died unmarried. 

D 6. Anne, born 1728; died unmarried. 

D 7. Colonel Charles, born 1736; married Sarah Murray. 

John Lewis' children were all born in Ireland, except Charles, the 
youngest. 

D 1, Samuel was a captain in the war between the English and 
French colonists. His brothers, Andrew, William and Charles, were 
members of his company, and all four were at Braddock's defeat and 
three of them wounded. 

D 2. Thomas Lewis was the colonial surveyor of Augusta county, 
Va; was a member of the House of Burgesses; was a member of 
the Virginia convention of 1776, and was one of the commission- 
ers of the Confederation in 1777 to treat with the Indian tribes who 
had been defeated at the battle of the Point. He married Jane, 
daughter of Wm. Strother, of Stafford county, Va., in 1749, and left 
the following issue: 

E 1. John, born 1749 ; died single. 

E 2. Margaret Ann, born 1751 ; married McClenahan and 

Wm, Bowyer. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 7 

E 3. Agatha, born 1753 ; married Captain John Frogg and Cap- 
tain John Stuart. 

E 4. Jane, born 1755 ; married Thomas Hughes. 

E 5. Andrew, born 1757 ; died single. 

E 6. Thomas, born 1760 ; died single. 

E 7. Mary, born 1762 ; married John McElhany. 

E 8. Elizabeth, born 1765 ; married Thos. M. Gilmer. 

E 9. Anne, born 1767 ; married Mr. Douthat and Mr. 

French. 

E 10. Frances, born 1769; married Layton Yaney. 

E 11. Charles, born 1772; married Miss Yaney. 

E 12. Sophia, born 1775; married John Carthrae. 

E 13. William Benjamin, born 1778; married Miss M. Hits. 

Thomas Lewis' three oldest sons, John, Andrew and Thomas, Jr. , 
were officers in the Revolutionary army. John and Andrew were 
with General Washington at Valley Forge and throughout the Jersey 
campaign. John and Thomas were at the surrender of Cornwallis, 
and Andrew was an officer under General Wayne in his expedition 
against the Western Indians in 1795, and lost an arm. 

Captain McClenahan, the first husband of Margaret Lewis, and 
Captain John Frogg, the first husband of Agatha Lewis, were both 
killed at the battle of the Point. 

From ' ' Georgian, ' ' by Governor Gilmer ; from the ' ' History of 
Augusta county, Va. , " by J. L. Peyton, and other historical works, 
WG gather the following facts relative to (D 3) General Andrew Lewis, 
son of Pioneer John, of Augusta county, Va. : 

' ' General Andrew Lewis, son of John, of Augusta county, Va. , 
was born in Ireland in 1720. He emigrated with his father to 
America, who finally settled in Augusta county. General Andrew 
was upwards of six feet in stature, of uncommon activity and 
strength, and of a form of exact symmetry. His countenance was 
stern and invincible, his deportment reserved and distant. Being 
among the early settlers of Virginia, he became familiar with danger 
and inured to toil and hardships in early life. He lived on Roanoke 
river, in Botetourt county. He took a very active part in the Indian 
wars. In 1754 he was twice wounded in the battle of Fort Necessity 
at the Great Meadows, under General Washington, by whom he was 
appointed Major of his regiment during the French and Indian war, 
and no officer more fully enjoyed his confidence. Major Lewis com- 
manded the Sandy creek expedition in 1756; was in Braddock's de- 
feat, and was made prisoner at Grant's defeat, where he exhibited 



8 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

signal prudence and bravery. His fortitude while a prisoner was 
equal to his courage in battle, and commanded the respect of the 
French officers. 

In 1774 he was a member of the Assembly, and when Patrick 
Henry's celebrated resolutions were carried a committee was ap- 
pointed to prepare a plan of defense. That committee consisted 
of Patrick Henry, Richard Henry Lee, Benjamin Harrison, George 
Washington, Edmund Pendleton, Thomas Jefferson, Andrew Lewis 
and others. An Indian war being apprehended, Dunmore appointed 
General Andrew Lewis, of Botetourt county, then a member of the 
Assembly, to the command of the Southern division of the forces 
raised in Botetourt, Augusta, and the adjoining counties east of the 
Blue Ridge. The troops rendezvoused at Camp Union, now Lewis- 
burg, in Greenbrier county, where they were joined by other troops. 

On the 11th of September, 1774, General Lewis, with eleven hun- 
dred men, commenced his march through the wilderness, piloted by 
Captain Arbuckle — flour, ammunition and camp equipage being 
transported on horseback. After a march of one hundred and sixty 
miles they reached, on the 30th of September, Point Pleasant, at 
the junction of the Great Kanawha with the Ohio river, where he so 
signally defeated the Shawnee Indians on the 10th of October, 1774. 

" The Indians were led on by Red Hawk, a Delaware chief; Scop- 
pathus, a Mingo; Chiyawee, a Wyandotte; Logan, a Cayuga; and 
Ellinipsico, and his father. Cornstalk, Shawnee chiefs. 

"In 1768, when he was a commissioner on behalf of Virginia at 
the Treaty of Fort Stanwix, in New York, the Governor of that col- 
ony remarked of him, that ' the earth seemed to tremble under him 
as he walked along.' At the commencement of the Revolutionary 
war, Washington considered him the foremost military man in 
America, and the one most worthy of the post of commander-in- 
chief of the American army. 

'* His first important service, after the commencement of the Rev- 
olutionary war, was to drive the Scotch Governor, Dunmore, and his 
Tory adherents from the State of Virginia. 

"Dunmore, with his fleet, left Hampton Roads about the first of 
June, and entrenched himself with five hundred men, including 
many runaway negroes, on Gwynn's Island, in the Chesapeake, to 
the east of Matthews county. On the morning of the ninth of July, 
General Andrew Lewis with Colonel Adam Stephen opened their 
batteries upon the ship, Dunmore; she was so damaged that she cut 
her cables and retreated ; Lord Dunmore himself was wounded in 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 9 

the leg by a splinter, and his chinaware being smashed about him, 
he exclaimed, as was reported, ' Good God, that I should ever come 
to this!' A panic seized Dunmore's men, so that they precipi- 
tately evacuated the island. 

"General Lewis' military services, after driving Dunmore from 
the State, were confined principally to the defense of the country 
bordering on the Chesapeake Bay. His mountain constitution gave 
way from the unhealthiness of the climate. He resigned his office- 
set out for home, but died in Bedford county before he reached it." 



[From "Washington and his Generals," by Lippincott, 
Grambo & Co., page 333.] 

"BRIGADIER-GENERAL ANDREW LEWIS. 

"Andrew Lewis, son of a gentleman, who came to Virginia from 
Ireland whither a Huguenot ancestor had fled from France upon 
the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, settled in Augusta county in 
that colony, and was one of six (four) brothers distinguished for 
their bravery in defending the infant settlement against the Indians. 

"He was, with all his brothers, in a company, of which the eld- 
est was captain, at Braddock's defeat, and in October, 1758, acquired 
much reputation by his conckict at Fort Duquesne, where he saved 
the Highlanders under Major Grant from being entirely cut to pieces, 
and with that officer and most of his men was taken prisoner and 
carried to Montreal. The Scotchman wrote to General Forbes that 
Lewis had caused his defeat, and his letter falling into the hands of 
the commander of the enemy, who knew its falsehood, it was shown 
to Lewis, who challenged Grant, and upon his refusal to fight, gave 
him such a token of his estimation as could be received onl}- by a 
lying coward. This was the same Grant who, in 1775, declared in the 
British House of Commons, that he knew the Americans well, and 
would 'venture to predict that they would never dare face an Eng- 
lish army, being destitute of every requisite to make a good soldier. ' 

' ' Lewis was several times in the Colonial Legislature, and was a 
commissioner from Virginia, with the commissioners of Pennsyl- 
vania, New York and New England, to treat with the six Nations at 
Fort Stanwix in 1768. 

"Alluding to his strength, stature, symmetry, and grave and com- 
manding demeanor, the Governor of New York remarked on that 
occasion that ' the earth seemed to tremble under him as he walked. ' 



10 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. , 

"He was engaged in all the Indian wars of the West, down to the 
Revolution, and was the commanding general of the Virginia troops 
at the battle of Point Pleasant, on the 10th of October, 1774. 

' ' General Washington, with whom Lewis had been at Fort Neces- 
sity, and under whom he had served in various capacities, had 
formed a very high estimate of his abilities and character, and it is 
said that when the chief command of the Revolutionary Army was 
proposed to him, he expressed a wish that it had been given to his 
old associate. Lewis, himself, was very much disappointed when 
placed no higher than a Brigadier in the Continental army, and 
offended that Stephen, who had served under him, was preferred for 
a Major-General. 

"The chief wrote to him on this subject from Morristown on the 
30th of March, 1777 : 'I was much disappointed,' he observes, 
* at not perceiving your name in the list of Major-Generals, and 
most sincerely wish that the neglect may not induce you to abandon 
the service. Let me beseech you to reflect that the period has now 
arrived when our most vigorous exertions are wanted; when it is 
highly and indispensably necessary for gentlemen of ability in any 
line, but more especially in the military, not to withhold themselves 
from public employment, or suffer any small punctilios to persuade 
them to retire from their country' s service. The cause requires your 
aid ; no one more sincerely wishes it than I do. A candid reflection 
on the rank you held in the last war, added to a decent respect for 
the resolution of Congress, not to be confined in making or pro- 
moting general officers to any regular line, to the propriety of which 
all Americans submitted, may remove any uneasiness in your mind 
on the score of neglect. Upon my honor I think it ought. ' 

"Nevertheless, General Lewis, on the 15th of April, sent in his 
resignation, and Congress accepted it. 

' ' He was afterward a commissioner to treat with the Indians at 
Fort Pitt, and Washington, writing to him in respect to his services 
there, under date of October 15, 1778, remarks : 'If Congress are 
not convinced of the impropriety of a certain irregular promotion, 
they are the only set of men who require further and greater proofs 
than have already been given of the error of their measure. ' On 
his way home from the Ohio, General Lewis was seized with a fever, 
in Bedford county, about forty miles from his residence, where he 
died in 1781." 

The statue of General Andrew Lewis is one of those to be placed 
on the monument in the capital square in Richmond, Virginia. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY, 11 

D 3. General Andrew Lewis, ' ' the hero of the Point, ' ' married 
Elizabeth Givens of Augusta county, Va., in 1749, and left issue, viz. : 

E 1. Captain John, married Patsy Love, of Alexandria, Va. 

E 2. Thomas, married Miss Evans, of Point Pleasant. 

E 3. Colonel Samuel, of the United States Army, died in Green- 
brier county, Va. (unmarried). 

E 4. Colonel Andrew, of the United States Army, of Bent 
Mountain, Virginia, born 1759; married Eliza, daughter of John 
Madison, of Montgomery county, now Roanoke county; died 
1844. 

E 5. Annie, married Roland Madison, son of John, the clerk. 

E 6. William, born 1764; married Lucy, daughter of John Madi- 
son; his second wife was Nancy McClenahan. 

E 1. Captain John, son of General Andrew, was an officer under 
his father at Grant's defeat, when he was made a prisoner and car- 
ried to Quebec and from thence to France. After he was liberated 
he went to London, where he procured a commission in the British 
army, but at length he resigned and returned to Virginia; married 
Patsy Love and settled in the western part of Virginia, where he 
was killed by his own negroes. 

E 1. Captain John Lewis and Patsy Love Ipft the following 
named children : F 1, Andrew; F2, Samuel, married Miss Whitley; 
F 3, Charles, married a daughter of General Abraham Trigg, of Vir- 
ginia; F4, Elizabeth, married first, Mr. Luke; second, Mr. 

Ball; third, Mr. Marshall. 

(For the issue of Colonel Andrew Lewis and Eliza Madison ; of 
Annie Lewis and Roland Madison, and of William Lewis and Lucy 
Madison, see the Madison family on another page.) 

Roland Madison, Jr., was living at Rushville, la., in 1873. 

E 6. William Lewis, son of General Andrew, born 1764; married 
Lucy, daughter of John Madison. His second wife was Nancy Mc- 
Clenahan. He left the following issue: 

F 1. Andrew; F 2, Agatha; F 3, Sally, married Mr. Fleming 

and died in Huntsville, Ala., in 1865, d. s. p. 

F 4. Betty, married Mr. Beale, whose daughter married 

Mr. Norvell, Huntsville, Ala. 

F 5. Lucy M. , married John Bowyer, of Fincastle, Va. 

F 6. Wm. Lewis, Jr. , died in Mississippi, leaving six children. 

F 7. General John W., married Susan Bowyer, 1831, and moved 
to Alabama. He lost two sons in the Civil war of 1861. General 
John W. Lewis was a man of considerable abilit}'— a mcmbt-r of tiie 



12 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Legislature of Alabama and a general of the militia. He moved to 
Texas in 1842. 

F 8. Doctor Charles, was killed in a rencontre 111 the streets of 
Mobile. 

F 9. Anne, married Mr. Bradley, and in 1873 lived in San 

Antonio, Tex. 

F 10. Mary Jane, died young. 

F 11. Pauline, married Mr. Christian, and died in Tuscum- 

bia, Ala., 1876. 

D 4. Colonel William Lewis, son of Pioneer John, of Augusta 
county, was an officer under General Braddock and was wounded at 
his defeat. He was an elder in the Presbyterian church and resided 
at Sweet Springs, in Virginia. He married Ann Montgomery, 
had eight children, and died in 1811. They had issue, viz. : 

E 1. Margaret, married James McFarland, of Pittsburgh, Pa. 

^ 2. Major John, son of Colonel William Lewis, was an officer 
in the BeVolutionary war and commanded a compan}^ at the battle of 
Monmouth. He spent the winter of 1777 with Washington at Valle}' 
Forge. He was a man of great firmness, ability and patriotism. 
He married Jane S. Thomson, and Mary Preston; left issue and died 
at Sweet Springs, in Virginia, in 1823. 

E 3. Major Thomas, son of Colonel William Lewis, born 1761. 
He was appointed as Major of the United States Army by AVash- 
ingtom He was greatly distinguished for gallantry and was called 
the "modern Chevalier Bayard." He killed Dr. Bell, of South Car- 
olina, in a duel, and died in 1804. He was an officer in Wayne's 
army. 

E 4. Alexander, son of Colonel William Lewis, born 1763; mar- 
ried and left posterity; died in 1804. 

E 5. Colonel William T. Lewis, son of Colonel William, born in 
1766; married Elizabeth Cabell, of Nelson county, Va. He died 
childless at Mount Athos, his home, near Lynchburg, Va., in 1828. 
He was remai'kable for his talents, was a member of Congress and 
came within a few votes once of being elected Governor of Virginia. 

E 6. Agatha, daughter of Colonel William Lewis, born in 1774; 
married Colonel Oliver Towles, of Campbell county, Va., in 1794. 
She died in 1843, leaving posterity. 

E 7. Elizabeth M., born 1777; married Colonel John Trent, of 
Cumberland county, Va. ; died in 1837, leaving posterity. 

E 8. Dr. Charles W., born 1780; United States Quartermaster; 
married Mary B. Irvine — had issue. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 13 

D 7. Colonel Charles Lewis, sou of Pioneer John Lewis, was 
born in Virginia in 1736. He was noble, generous, gallant and fear- 
less. He was once captured by the Indians and doubtless would 
have been put to death had he not made his escape by out-runnino- 
the savages. He commanded a regiment at the battle of the Point, 
on October 10, 1774, where he was killed. Virginia perpetuated its 
remembrance by naming a county after him. He married Sarah 
Murray and left the following issue : 

E 1. Elizabeth, born 1762; died unmarried. 

E 2. Margaret, born 1765; married Major Prior. 

E 3. Captain John, born 1766 ; married Rachel Miller, of Augusta 
county, Va. He died on Cow Pasture river, in Bath county, in 1843, 
leaving issue. 

E 4. Mary, born 1768; died unmarried. 

E 5. Thomas, born 1771 ; died unmarried. 

E 6. Colonel Andrew, son of Colonel Charles Lewis, born 1772; 
married Margaret Stuart in 1802, and died in 1833, leaving issue. 

E 7. Charles, born 1774; married Jane Dickerson in 1799, and 
left issue at his death in 1803. 

For a full catalogue of the names, etc., of this branch of the 
Lewis family, the reader is referred to the History of Augusta 
County, Va., by John L. Peyton, and published by S. M. Yost & 
Son, of Staunton, Va. , price $3. 50 ; or to a work entitled ' ' Georgian, ' ' 
by ex-Governor George R. Gilmer, of Lexington, Oglethorpe county, 
Georgia. 



14 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



CHAPTEE II. 

A 3. General Robert Lewis, one of the Welsh brothers, was a 
lawyer by profession. He resided in Brecon, in Wales, until he lo- 
cated in the city of London, with a view of practicing his profession 
there, but emigrated in a short time to America and settled in 
Abington, or Ware Parish, Gloucester county, Va. , about the middle 
of the Seventeenth century. 

General Robert had issue, viz. : 

B 1. John, Sr. , was born in England, where he was educated, 
and married, in 1666, Isabella Warner, in honor of whom he called 
his seat in Gloucester county, "Warner Hall." He died in 1725. 

B 2. Major William, of Chemokins, St. Peter's Parish, New 
Kent county, Va. 

B 1. John, Sr. , son of General Robert Lewis and Isabella War- 
ner, had issue, viz. : 

C 1. Major John, Jr., of Gloucester, a member of the Virginia 
Council, was born November 30,- 1669. He married Frances Fielding; 
she died in 1731, and he died in 1754. 

C. 2. Warner, married Eleanor, widow of William, son of Sir 
William Gooch, Governor of Virginia, and daughter of James 
Bowles, of Mar3^1and. 

C 3. A daughter, who married Colonel Willis, of Fredericksburg, 
Virginia. 

C 4. A daughter, who married Francis Meriwether. 

C 5. John. 

C 6. Isabella, was baptized in 1707. 

C 7. Anna, was baptized in 1712. 

ISSUE OP Cl, MAJOR JOHN LEWIS, JR., AND FRANCES FIELDING. 

D 1. Colonel Robert, of Bel voir, Albemarle county, Va., mar- 
ried Jane, daughter of Nicholas Meriwether, and died in 1757. His 
will is on record in Albemarle county, Va. 

D 2. Colonel Charles, of the Byrd, married Lucy, daughter of 
John Taliaferro, of the Manor plantation of Snow Creek, Spotsyl- 
vania county, Va., about 1750. John Taliaferro, and his son, Law- 
rence, were buried at Hickory Neck church, near Williamsburg, 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 15 

James City county, Va., where their tombstones may be found with 
the following inscriptions on them: 



" Here lies interred the body of 
COLONEL JOHN TALIAFERRO, 

of Snow Creek, in the County of Spotsylvania, 

"Who departed this life on the third 

day of May, Anno Domini, 

one thousand seven hundred and forty-four, 

in the fifty-seventh year of his age. 

He left issue, two sons and 

three daughters." 



" Here lies the body of 

LAWRENCE TALIAFERRO, 

son of Colonel John Taliaferro, 

of Snow Creek, in Spotsylvania county. 

Who departed this life the 1st day of May, 1748, 

in the 27th year of his age. 

He married Susan Power, 

of James City county, and left issue 

by her — one daughter." 



D 3. Colonel Fielding, who first married Catharine Washington, 
a cousin of General George. His second wife was Betty, a sister of 
General George Washington. 

THE WASHINGTON FAMILY. 

A 1. John Washington married Anne Pope and had issue, viz. : 

B 1. Lawrence Washington, married Mildred Warner, daughter 
of Speaker Augustine Warner, Jr. They had issue, viz. : 

C 1. John Washington, married Catherine Whiting, whose 
daughter, Catherine, married Colonel Fielding Lewis in 1746. 

C 2. Mildred W'ashington, married Lewis, Roger Gregory 

and Harry Willis, of Fredericksburg, Va. 

C 3. Augustine Washington, born 1694; married Jane Butler 
and Mary Ball, daughter of Joseph Ball. 

ISSUE OF AUGUSTINE WASHINGTON AND MARY BALL. 

D 1. General George Washington, President of the United States, 
married Mrs. Custis, nee Martha Dandridge. 

D 2. Charles Washington, married Mildred Thornton. 



16 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

D 3. Samuel Washington, married Jane Cliampe and Mildred' 
G-regory. 

D 4. Betty Washington, married Colonel Fielding Lewis — his, 
second wife. 

D 5. Mildred, died single. 

D 3. Colonel Fielding Lewis settled near Fredericksburg, Va. ;. 
was a merchant, burgess, vestryman, etc. He was twice married — 
first, in 1746, to Catherine Washington, a cousin of General George 
Washington; she died in February, 1750. His second wife was 
Betty, the sister of General George Washington, whom he married 
in 1750. 

The following sketch, by Mrs. Ella Bassett Washington, is re- 
printed by permission from the Century Magazine of April, 1892: 

********** -K- 

The record of marriage upon the page of the old and much-worn; 
family Bible gives the date 1730. The volume is a most quaintly illustrated 
quarto; time and age have turned the paper to a pale yellow-brown, but 
the hand-writing of the very brief and simple entry is quite distinct and 
clear. 

"Augustine Washington and Mary Ball were married the sixth of March, 
1730-31." 

This Bible has been a hereditary relic in the writer's family for five 
generations, having been given by Mary Ball Washington to her only 
daughter, Betty, Mrs. Fielding Lewis, and transmitted directly to her 
descendants. The scribe in the old Bible has given no other detail of the 
event, not even whether it took place in church or at home. 

That the bride was blonde and beautiful both history and tradition tell^ 
and of the bridegroom in his fortieth year a description has been trans- 
mitted from one generation to another. Mary Washington's description of 
her husband is confirmed by the testimony of contemporaries— a noble- 
looking man, of distinguished bearing, tall and athletic, with fair, florid' 
complexion, brown hair, and fine gray eyes. * * * *■ 

The bridegroom's home at this time was in Westmoreland county, on 
the Potomac. The house, built in pioneer days, was small but substantial, 
the main building hip-roofed, with dormer windows, and a one-story wing 
running back, which was used as a chamber; in this room, family tradition 
tells us, George Washington was born. The long side of the house fronted 
the river, which was, and is, about three hundred and fifty feet distant. 
The bank is about fifteen feet high, with, at this date, a depth of water at 
its base averaging five feet; and here it was that vessels from Europe came- 
laden with supplies for the Washingtons, and, returning, bore away with 
them the products of the Wakefield and Haywood plantations. 

Around the mansion were the fine fields of its owner's broad domain, 
extending for a mile, and skirted on one side by the Potomac. There was, 
fuU measure of content in this abode where the first years of Mary Wash- 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 17 

ington's wedded life were spent, made perfect when, as the old Bible tells 
us, George Washington, son of Augustine and Mary, his wife, was born 
*'ye nth day of February, 1731-2, about 10 in the morning, and," the rec- 
ord goes on to say, "was baptized the 3d day of April following, Mr. Bev- 
erly Whiting and Captain Christopher Brooks, godfathers, and Mrs. Mildred 
Gregory, godmother." 

Other children came in rapid succession. They were Betty, Samuel, 
John Augustine, Charles, and Mildred, who died in infancy. The second 
son, Samuel was born in November, 1734, and in the following spring, while 
the servants, preparing for the planting of early crops, were burning the 
accumulated "trash," the mansion took fire and was burned to the ground. 

When the Wakefield estate was sold many years ago by one of the 
Washingtons to another of the name, a reservation was made of the spot 
where the house had stood, and in 1858 this reservation was presented to 
the State by its hereditary owner, the late Colonel Lewis W. Washington, 
of Virginia, conditional upon the place being inclosed, and a fitting monu- 
ment erected upon it, properly inscribed as the birthplace of Washington. 
********** 

The place to which Augustine Washington removed in 1735, was known 
to his Lewis grandchildren, who subsequently inherited it, as Pine Grove ; 
it was also called Ferry Farm, from the adjacent ferry over the Rhappa- 
hannock. The house was small, and stood upon a bank above the river, 
surrounded b}' fine orchards, garden, and shrubberies. The Washingtons. 
with their children were regular attendants at the Episcopal church in 
Overwharton Parish, where their home was situated. * * *- 

Eight years passed serenely, when suddenly Mary Washington's great 
sorrow came. Early in April, her husband riding one day over his planta- 
tion, was caught in a rain-storm ; he took cold, and after a brief illness died 
of rheumatic gout. The record in the old Bible tells us tersely, "Augus- 
tine Washington departed this life ye 12th day of April, 1740, aged 49 
years." His remains were taken back to his birthplace on the Potomac, 
and entombed in the famih- vault. One clause of his will is a little curious : 
"It IS my will and desire that my said four sons' (George, Samuel, John, 
and Charles) estates may be kept in my wife's hands until thej- respectively 
attain the age of twent5'-one j^ears, in case tny said ivife continues so long un- 
Tnarried." 

The provision in case of a second marriage proved unnecessary, for, 
though left a widow at thirty-seven, Marj' Washington was loyal to her 
husband's memorj- and to his trust. And now, having to assume her hus- 
band's duties in addition to her own, no time for sorrowful brooding was 
permitted to the widowed mother, upon whom the management of her own 
and her children's properties devolved ; for Augustine Washington be- 
queathed landed estates to each of his j'oung sons, and made an especial 
provision in sterling money for his only daughter, Betty. The personal 
care and training of their children until majority, were left solely to the 
mother, and of the result able historians have written that in these manifold 
2 



18 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

duties she " acquitted herself with great fidelitj- to her trust, and with en- 
tire success." ********* 

For nearly a decade from tliis time tliere is no special note of Mary 
Washington's life. In 1750 her only daughter, Betty, was married to Colonel 
Fielding Lewis of Gloucester county, who built for her an elegant house 
on the border of the village of Fredericksburg, that she might be near her 
mother. 

In 1765 the passage of the Stamp Act startled the colonists from their 
dream of peace. Deeply moved as she was by the public agitation, keenly 
alive to its possibilities of peril to her sons, the prevailing excitement made 
no change in the routine of her duties. Directions to the overseer, super- 
vision of the spinners' and weavers' work — an important item, as the ser- 
vants were clothed in the main from fabrics of home manufacture — and 
the daily direction of the household, kept her constantlj' occupied. Typi- 
cal of her force of character and her rigid discipline was the rebuke she 
administered to an overseer who presumptuously departing from her direc- 
tions, followed his own judgment upon some matter of work. When 
arraigned for the offense, he made the insolent reply, "Madam, in mj' judg- 
ment the work has been done to better advantage than if I had followed 
your directions." A withering flash from her eyes fell upon the offender, 
with the imperious question: " And, pray, who gave you the right to ex- 
ercise any judgment in the matter? I command you, sir; there is nothing 
left f6r you but to obe}\" The overseer was dismissed at once, and tradi- 
tion tells that afterward, relating his misfortune to his friends, he declared 
that when he " met the blue lightning of madam Washington's glance he 
felt exactly as if he had been knocked down." 

Before leaving home for the Continental Congress in Philadelphia, with 
a recognition of the deadl}' strife the nation was entering upon, and with 
tender forethought for his own aging mother, Washington induced her to 
leave the lonely country home and to remove to Fredericlvsburg. Mistress 
Lewis and her husband urged that she should come to live with them in 
their beautiful home overlooking the town, but her answer to their loving 
insistence was tender yet firm: "I thank you for your dutiful and affec- 
tionate offer, but my wants are few in this life, and I feel perfectly com- 
petent to take care of myself." She selected a house of good size on 
Charles street. There were stables and an orchard in the rear, and a gar- 
den, redolent in their season with lilacs, calj'canthus, flowering almond, 
hyacinths, cowslips, and other flowers. This garden was her favorite re- 
sort. Washington's solicitude for his mother's comfort was not satisfied 
until he had assisted in her removal and seen her comfortablj' settled in 
the new home. 

Some of its furnishings may be gathered from the items of her will, 
which states that she is disposing of what "remains of her worldly estate." 
Numerous beds, bedsteads, counterpanes, curtains and quilts ; dressing- 
glasses, looking-glasses — probably parlor mirrors — silver tablespoons and 
teaspoons, "square dining-table," sets of china, "blue and white" and 
" red and white," are itemized. " Six red leather chairs," an "oval table," 
and her " walnut writing-desk with drawers," are also mentioned. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 19 

There was also a mahoganj' sideboard, given shortly before her death 
to her daughter for her young grandson Robert. The writer's mother well 
remembered it; but in the settlement of Major Robert Lewis's estate it was 
sold in the sale of personal property. The value of such relics was not 
realized then as now. The equipages mentioned in her will are a "phaeton 
-and bay horse," also her "riding-chair, and two black horses;" so the stable 
was amply supplied. The number of attendants upon the mistress of this 
comfortable establishment formed quite an array for one person's needs; 
but in that day a retinue of domestics was required by every Southern 
lady. 

The housekeeper, Mrs. Skelton, an active young woman, had general 
charge under the mistress' directions, and three colored servants, Patt}', 
who held high dignit.y as "maid" to her lady, Bet, or Betsey, the cook, 
and her husband Stephen, coachman, sometimes gardener, with their two 
children, who had occasional duties between house and kitchen, completed 
the household. 

This house where "Washington's mother passed her declining years, still 
stands in Fredericksburg, Virginia, but not in its original form, one end 
having been altered and the roof raised to give a full second story, which 
destroyed its former quaintness of aspect. 

During the tr^^ing years when her son was leading the Continental forces, 
the mother was watching and praying, following him with anxious eyes; 
but to the messengers who brought tidings, whether of victory or defeat, 
she turned a calm face, whatever tremor of feeling it might mask, and to 
her daughter she said, chiding her for undue excitement, "The sister of 
the commanding general should be an example of fortitude and faith." At 
last Fredericksburg was thrilled with the glad tidings of the victory at 
Trenton. Friends flocked to her with congratulations, and when the prin- 
cipal citizens waited upon her to express their gratitude and pride in the 
nation's hero, she gentlj' answered, "George seems to have deserved well 
of his country;" and when they read letters eulogizing his skill and courage, 
she said, smiling, "Gentlemen, here is too much flattery; still, George will 
not forget the lessons I have taught him — he will not forget himself though 
he is an object of so much praise." 

The following years were anxious and troubled ones, with few lights 
amid their shadows ; but she never swerved from the systematic daily 
routine, and in good weather took frequent drives to her country-place in 
Stafford, making an impressive appearance in progress, said the grandson 
from whose personal recollections these facts are given. Her favorite con- 
vej'ance, imported from London, was a "park phaeton," so called. It was 
low, without a top, and resembled a Windsor chair, with the difference 
that it had aseat.in front for the driver and two seats within; it was an 
easy step from the ground, and had a somewhat straight back of perpen- 
dicular rounds. Her coachman, Stephen, was a tall, elderly colored man, 
full of pompous pride and dignity. On these excursions into the country, 
in summer she wore a dark straw hat with broad brim and low crown, tied 
down under the chin with black ribbon strings; but in winter a warm hood 
was substituted, and she was wrapped in the "purple cloth cloak lined with 



20 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

shag" that is described in the bequests of her will. In her hand she car- 
ried her gold-headed cane, which feeble health now rendered necessary as 
a support, and, as my grandfather and Mr. Custis stated, "When passing- 
through the streets of Fredericksburg in this unostentatious manner, her 
progress became an ovation, for every one, from the gray-haired old man 
to the thoughtless boy, lifted his hat to the mother of Washington." 

Her systematic exactness in business was a distinguishing trait, and 
even when her health and strength failed under the weight of age and in- 
firmity, the spirit was still strong and steadfast. When her son-in-law, 
Colonel Lewis, desiring to relieve her of business cares, offered to take the 
supervision of them, he received the resolute reply, "Do you. Fielding, 
keep my books in order, for j'our eyesight is better than mine; but leave 
the management of the farm to me." 

The experience of these j'ears must have been deejDly felt bj* Washing- 
ton's mother ; but whatever the tension of thought, there was no change 
of demeanor, while she dispensed a large though simple hospitality to the 
friends who gathered around her from far and near; and though her means 
were limited, her charities were wide and generous. There was something 
of nervous energy in her constant occupation, knitting needles ever flying 
in the nimble fingers ; for with her daughter and their domestics to aid, 
dozens of socks were knitted and sent to the General at camp for distribu- 
tion, together with garments and provisions, the fruit of her thrift and 
economy. 

Young grandchildren were growing up around her through all this bit- 
ter war, bright boys and one girl. The children often came with their 
mother in her almost daily visits to her honored parent, and were always 
made welcome, though at the same time required to behave properly. The 
distance was not great between the suburban mansion of Mistress Lewis 
and her mother's house in the town, and these visits were frequently re- 
turned. 

Sometimes the venerable but still active lady walked over in the morn- 
ing to spend the day, followed by her handmaid Patty, whose turban hand- 
kerchief towered in a toploftical structure, carrying with her an extra 
wrap and the little basket of needle work or knitting for her mistress, who 
usually ordered Stephen to come in the evening with the chaise to fetch 
her home. 

Accustomed to exercise, admiring nature's beauties, she loved to go into 
the open and enjoy them, and retained to a remarkable degree her strength 
and activity. In their grandmother's walks the young Lewises were often 
her companions, forming in their early years a sort of infantry escort. In 
later years. Major Lewis often reverted to them as among his most interest- 
ing and pleasant recollections of his grandmother. 

Upon the Lewis estate overlooking the vallej' of the Rhappahannock, 
was a favorite spot which she afterward selected for her burial. Where 
several pictviresque gray rocks were piled she would sometimes stop to rest, 
and, seated upon a low, fiat bowlder, would meditate while the young ones 
amused themselves. 

But they better liked to nestle near her side while she chatted cheerfully.. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 21 

tt'aching them lessons of natural history illustrated by their surroundings 
and linked with the Bible story of the creation of the world, the deluge, 
and the changes that came over the earth. The manner of her speakino- 
was so deeply impre =ve that neither the lessons taught nor the scenes con- 
nected with them were ever quite forgotten by the young listeners. As 
one of them related when himself growing old, "there was a spell over them 
as they looked into grandmother's uplifted face, with its sweet expression 
of perfect peace," and they, "'were very quiet " during the homeward walk. 
A small picture of this spot was preserved many years in the family, but 
lost during the war — in the foreground the group of rocks, with two splen- 
<]id pine trees towering above them. 

Firm as were the forces of her nature, Mary Washington was almost 
overcome with terror during a thunder-storm. This fear was the effect of 
a shock received in youth, when a girl friend sitting at her side, had been 
instantly killed by lightning. As long as she lived she would sit silent and 
still during a thunder-storm, with closed eyes and clasped hands. On one 
occasion the daughter, missing her mother, and knowing how she suffered, 
found her kneeling by the bed with her face buried in its pillows, praying. 
Upon rising, she said, "I have been striving for years against this weak- 
ness, for you know, Betty, my trust is in God ; but sometimes my fears are 
stronger than my faith." 

The Bible was her constant study, its precepts the guide of her life, and 
the influence of its teachings ever shone in her character and conversation. 
When teaching her children from its pages, any irreverence or mutinous 
merriment was sternly rebuked. The old Bible which she used has de- 
scended through Robert Lewis to his daughter, the writer's mother. It is 
a curious specimen of the illustrations of the day, full of horrors and ab- 
surdities. The venerable volume is covered with homespun cloth, in a 
<;heck plaid of now faded blue and buff, the Continental colors; this cover, 
fashioned by her hands, remains upon the sacred book much worn and 
patched to preserve the original fabric. 

In the intervals of war she had occasional brief visits of cheer and com- 
fort from her younger .sons, who were serving in the army at different 
points. John Augustine commanded a regiment of Virginia troops, was 
afterward a member of the House of Burgesses, and married Hannah, 
■daughter of Colonel John Bushrod. Samuel won the rank of colonel, and 
was married five times. Charles, the youngest son, also became a colonel, 
and married Mildred, daughter of Colonel Frances Thornton, of Virginia. 

After the treason of Arnold, he, with a horde of British and Tory free- 
booters, landed upon the James river in Virginia, plundering and desolat- 
ing the country ; and when, in the spring of 1781, an armament of Briti-sh 
vessels ascended the Potomac river, threatening to devastate that portion 
of Virginia not remote from Fredericksburg, and near Mount Vernon, 
Washington became very anxious on his mother's account. Speaking of 
this to her daughter, the serene matron remarked : "My good son should 
not be so anxious about me, for he is the one in danger, facing constant 
peril for our country's cause. I am safe enough ; it is my part to suffer, 
and to feel, as I do, most anxious and apprehensive over him." 



.22 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

When the tidings of the splendid success at Yorktown were brouglit 
direct from the General to his mother, she was moved to an exclamation of 
fervent thanksgiving: "Thank God! the war is ended, and we shall be 
blessed with peace, happiness, and independence, for at last our country is 
free!" Shortly after the surrender of Cornwallis, Washington left York- 
town with a brilliant suite of French and American officers, and started 
upon his journey to Philadelphia, stopping on the way at Fredericksburg 
to visit his mother. It was nearlj' seven years since he had last seen her 
face; he left Mount Vernon in May, 1775, and did not return till the autumn 
of 1781. Now that the time of meeting drew near, his mother was 
serene but very quiet, only smiling to herself oftener than usual. Yet it 
was not the hero crowned that filled her thoughts, but the son who, after 
years of absence and danger, was coming back to her. On the 11th of No- 
vember, 1781, the town of Fredericksburg was all aglow with joy and rev- 
elry. Washington "in the midst of his numerous and brilliant suite," 
wrote Mr. Custis, "sent to apprise her [his mother] of his arrival, and to 
know when it would be her pleasure to receive him. * * * Alone and on 
foot, the general-in-chief of the combined armies of France and America," 
he goes on to say in the grandiloquent style of the day, "the deliverer of 
his country, the hero of the hour, repaired to pay his humble tribute of 
duty to her whom he venerated as the author of his being," etc. When the 
warm embrace of greeting was over, looking into his face with earnest, 
close observance, her eyes enkindled with maternal love, she said tenderly, 
"You are growing old, George ; care and toil have been making marks in 
your face since I saw it last." Her voice is said to have been singularly 
sweet, and he loved its cadence as she called him by name. She inquired 
as to his health, and she spoke much "of old times and old friends, but of 
his glory not one word." 

The citizens of Fredericksburg had resolved to give a grand ball in 
honor of the victors, and the lady above all others who should grace the 
fete was the mother of Washington. The messenger who called to invite 
her attendance was graciously received, and her consent given to gratify 
her son and friends, although, she added, her "dancing-days were pretty 
well over." 

The town-hall at Fredericksburg, where this ball took place, was deco- 
rated with evergreens and flowers, and had fresh muslin curtains at the 
windows, and seats along the side of the room for those not dancing, and a 
low platform at the end where chairs were placed for the most distinguished 
guests. When Washington entered at the early hour then considered cor- 
rect, his mother leaning upon his arm, every head was bowed in reverence. 
She wore a simple black silk gown, with snow-white kerchief and cap, her 
figure still erect, though it had grown thinner and frailer than it once had 
been. 

The foreigners stoo3 in admiring astonishment as they watched the 
crowd pressing forward to gain a salutation. When she was holding her 
little court, one of the French officers observed, "If such are the matrons 
of America, well may she boast of illustrious sons." Neither elated nor ex- 
cited by the largess of compliments and attentions bestowed upon her,. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 23 

when ten o'clock approached she arose, and bidding good-night, remarked 
that it was "time for old folks to be in bed," and left the ball-room sup- 
ported as before upon her son's strong and tender arm. 

The Marquis de Lafayette, before leaving the States for his home in 
France, and after a farewell visit to Mount Vernon, came to Fredericks- 
burg to bid adieu to his friend's honored mother — there is a discrepancy 
in statements as to the exact date of this visit — and upon the occasion was 
conducted to her presence by the young grandson Robert Lewis, who often 
narrated the incident to his family and friends. 

She was walking in the garden, taking careful note of its condition, 
when they approached. Her black stuff gown and apron were as neat as 
a nun's, while above the white cap that nearly covered her gray hair a 
broad straw hat was worn, tied down under her chin. 

"There, sir, is my grandmother," said young Lewis, pointing toward 
her. The Marquis made the military salute as they approached, while she, 
recognizing the distinguished visitor, came to the garden paling, and, look- 
ing over, with a kind smile, remarked : "Ah, Marquis, you see an old 
woman ; but come in, I can make you welcome without parade of chang- 
ing my dress." 

The impulsive Frenchman's reply was full of warmth, he calling hei 
the mother of his friend, his hero, the preserver of the country and its lib- 
erty. For had not America adopted the sons of France who fought for her, 
and was not Washington's mother dear to him for her noble son's sake? 
After listening to this outpouring of enthusiastic praise, her simple answer 
was, "I am not surprised at what George has done, for he was always a 
good boy." 

Lafayette remained some time talking with her, and when he arose to 
take leave referred to his speedy dejiarture for his native land and home, 
and asked that she would bestow upon him a blessing. "With clasped hands, 
and the light of faith in her uplooking eyes, the blessing was fervently in- 
voked, beseeching that "God might grant him every blessing of safety, 
happiness, prosperity and peace," so moving the heart of her noble guest 
that tears filled his ej'es,, and, taking the frail, faded hands into his warm 
clasp, he bent his head to touch them reverently with his lips as the final 
adieu was spoken. The grandson, who witnessed this scene, said that it 
was "so affecting that he almost choked to keep from crying aloud." 
Speaking of Washington's mother subsequently, the Marquis made the re- 
mark that he had seen the only Roman matron who was living in his day. 

The years of life now left to her were weary ones, a painful and wasting 
disease — cancer — caused by an accidental blow slowly undermining her 
naturally fine constitution. The weakness and suffering were met with 
uncomplaining calmness and cheerfulness ; nothing that could be done by 
her loving children for her health and comfort was omitted. 

Writing to the President from Fredericksburg, July 24, 1789, his sister 
says: 

"I am sorry to inform you mother still suffers from her breast. She 
is sensible of it, and is perfectly resigned— wishes for nothing more than to 
keep it easy. She Avishes to hear from you, and will not believe you are 
well till she receives it from under your hand." 



24 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

When the summer heats of the low country were prostrating, she was 
sometimes persuaded to take a trip to Berkeley Springs and the fine moun- 
tain country of Frederick, where her sons Samuel and Charles resided. 
Her life was happily spared to see her eldest son elevated to the highest 
dignity a grateful people could offer. It was in April, 1789, that a final 
farewell took place between mother and son. He found her bright of mind, 
serene of spirit, but weak and worn in bodj-. The fear that this would be 
their last meeting on earth intensified the tenderness of the interview. 
When the son spoke regretfvilly of her illness, inquiring anxiously if some- 
thing more might not be done to relieve it, and expressed his profound sor- 
row that public dut}' compelled him to leave her, but however painful, he 
could not go to his responsible position without having her bid him God- 
speed, then adding, "So soon as public business which must necessarily be 
encountered in arranging a new government has been disposed of I shall 
hasten to Virginia, and — " she gently interrupted him. "You will see me 
no more," she said. "My great age and the disease that is rapidly ap- 
proaching my vitals warn me that I shall not be long in this world. I trust 
in God. I am prepared for a better. But go, George, and fulfill the high 
destiny which Heaven appears to assign j'ou. Go, my son, and may that 
Heaven and your mother's blessing be always with you." 

Her hand was laid upon his bended head, and the great man's strong 
frame trembled in the parting embrace, while a sob, almost a groan, burst 
from his breast, for already he saw that the shadow of death was upon her. 

When Washington arose to go she went with him to the door, leaning 
fondly upon his arm. Stopping on the threshold to repeat the last adieus, 
her son silently pressed into her hand a purse filled with gold pieces. This 
she refused to receive, and insisted upon returning the gift. " I don't need 
it, my son," she remonstrated. "My wants are few, and I think I have 
enough." 

" Let me be the judge of that, mother," he replied ; " but whether you 
think you need it or not, keep it for my sake." 

This appeal was irresistible, and the purse was retained ; but after he 
had gone she dropped it indifferently upon the table, and sank into a chair, 
lost in sad reverie. Her grandson, coming with a message, witnessed this 
parting scene, and, too respectful to disturb her sorrow, hastened home to 
tell his mother all that had passed. Feeling anxious touching her mother's 
state, and fearing that this painful excitement might cause serious illness, 
she hastened at once to her side. Very calm and still they found her, 
seated with drooping head and sad, unseeing eyes. 

In Washington's cash accounts and memorandum-books many entries 
appear of money given to his mother, in sums ranging from three to thirty 
pounds, during a period of years. Also "a chaise" and a "cloth cloak 
lined with silk shag." 

Mary Washington's forebodings were fulfilled, for her death took place 
a few months afterward (in August), in her eighty-third year, upheld by 
unfaltering faith in the promises of her Bible and by full belief in the com- 
munion of the saints. It has been supposed that this event took place at 
the house in Fredericksburg where she had lived so many years ; but there 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 25 

IS a tradition that not long before her death the daughter induced her to 
consent to a removal to the Lewis home. All of her relatives, children, 
and grandchildren who could come were there ; but the best-beloved son 
was far away. 

Extracts from a diarj' of Robert Lewis, then in New York acting as as- 
sistant private secretary to the President, his uncle, inform us that on 
August 22d he was "surprised by a visit from Parson Ryan, who has 
brought letters from my sister Carter and Mr. Carter making mention that 
my grandmother was exceedingly ill and not likely to recover; " and though 
her death took place on the 25th, and she was laid to rest on the 28th, the 
news, sent b}- a messenger who had to ride the distance from Fredericks- 
burg to New York, did not reach her son until September 1st. The diary 
further states that " Baron Steuben ai:d Governor St. Clair dined with us 
to-day [September 1st] ; the Baron was remarkably cheerful and facetious, 
likewise greatly devoted to the President. In the midst of our mirth my 
xincle received a letter * * informing him of the death of my grand- 
mother, an event long expected." Only so far does the brief record go, 
but its writer said afterward, in a letter to his mother, " My uncle imme- 
diately retired to his room, and remained there for some time alone."' 

ISSUE OP D 1, COLONEL ROBERT LEWIS OF BEL VOIR, AND JANE 
MERIWETHER, OF ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VA. 

E 1. Robert, married Fauutlero}'; settled on the Dan river, 

Granville county, N. C. , from which county he was a delegate to 
Halifax, N. C, November 12, 1776, to the convention that formed 
the constitution of North Carolina. 

E 2. John, also settled on the Dan river in North Carolina. 

E 3. Charles, married his cousin Mary, daughter of Charles 
Lewis, of the ' ' Byrd ' ' plantation, and his wife, Mary, daughter of 
Isham Randolph, son of William Randolph, of Turkey Island, in 
1717. 

E 4. Nicholas, married Maiy, daughter of Dr. Thomas Walker, 
near Charlottesville, Va. 

E 5. William Lewis (captain in the State line during the Revo- 
lution), of Locust Hill, Albemarle county; married Lucy Meriwether, 
daughter of Thomas Meriwether, by whom he had three children, viz. : 

F 1. Meriwether Lewis, explorer of Oregon; died single. 

F 2. Reuben Lewis, was an Indian agent in the far West for 
iiwhile. He married his cousin, Mildred Dabney; no issue. 

F 3. Jane, married her cousin, Edmund Anderson; and her 
daughter, Gr 1, Ann, married her cousin, Thomas Fielding Lewis, 
son of Howell Lewis and his wife, Mary Carr, of Albemarle county, 
Va. After the death of William Lewis, of Locust Hill, Lucy, his 



26 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY, 

widow, married John Marks, a distinguished officer in the Revolu- 
tionary army, by whom she had two children : Dr. John Marks, and 
Mary Marks, who married William Moore. 

The following biographical sketch of Meriwether Lewis, by Thomas 
Jefferson, may be found in Lewis' and Clarke' s Travels : 

' ' Meriwether Lewis, late Governor of Louisiana, was born on the 
18th of August, 1774, near the town of Charlottesville, in the county 
of Albemarle, in Virginia, of one of the distinguished families of that 
State. John Lewis, one of his father' s uncles, was a member of the 
King' s Council before the Revolution (see Campbell' s Histoiy of Vir- 
ginia, page 393). Another of them. Fielding Lewis, married a sister 
of General Washington. His father (William Lewis) was the young- 
est of five sons of Colonel Robert Lewis, of Albemarle, the fourth of 
whom, Charles, was one of the early patriots who stepped forward 
in the commencement of the Revolution and commanded one of the 
regiments first raised in Virginia and placed on continental estab- 
lishment. Happily situated at home, with a wife and young family, 
and a fortune placing him at ease, he left all to aid in the liberation 
of his country from foreign usurpations, then first unmasking their 
ultimate end and aim. His good sense, integrity, bravery, enter- 
prise, and remarkable bodil}' powers, marked him as an officer of 
great promise ; but he, unfortunately, died early in the Revolution. 

"Nicholas Lewis, the second of his father' s brothers, commanded 
a regiment of militia in the successful expedition of 1776 against the 
Cherokee Indians. This member of the family of Lewises whose 
bravery was so usefully proved on this occasion, was endeared to all 
who knew him by his inflexible probity, courteous disposition, benev- 
olent heart and engaging modesty and manners. He was the um- 
pire of all the private differences of his country, selected always by 
both parties. He was also the guardian of Meriwether Lewis, of 
whom we are now to speak, and who had lost his father at an early 
age. He continued some j'ears under the fostering care of a tender 
mother, of the respectable family of Meriwethers, of the same count}', 
and was remarkable even in infancy for enterprise, boldness and 
discretion. When only eight years of age he habitually went out in 
the dead of night, alone with his dogs, into the forest to hunt the 
raccoon and opossum. 

' ' At the age of thirteen he was put to the Latin school and con- 
tinued at that until eighteen, when he returned to his mother and 
entered on the cares of his farm, having, as well as a younger brother, 
been left by his father with a competency for all the correct and 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY, 27 

comfortable purposes of a temperate life. At twenty he eno-aaed as 
a volunteer in the body of militia which were called out by General 
Washington, on an occasion of the discontent produced by the excise 
taxes in the western parts of the United States, and from that situ- 
ation he was removed to the regular services as a lieutenant in the 
line. At twenty-three he was promoted to a captaincy, and always 
attracting the first attention where punctuality and fidelit}- were 
requisite, he was appointed paj-master to his regiment. In 1792, 1 
proposed to the American Philosophical Society that we should set 
on foot a subscription to engage some competent person to explore 
the region by ascending the Missouri, crossing the stony mountains 
and descending the nearest river to the Pacific. Captain Lewis being 
then stationed at Charlottesville on the recruiting services, warmly 
solicited me to obtain for him the execution of that object. 1 told 
him that it was proposed that the person engaged should be attended 
by a single companion only, to avoid exciting alarm among the In- 
dians. This did not deter him, but the proposal did not succeed. 

"In 1803 Congress approved the proposition and voted a sum of 
money for carrying it into execution. Captain Lewis, who had then 
been near two years with me as private secretary', immediately 
renewed his solicitations to have the direction of the party. I had 
now had opportunity of knowing him intimatel}'. Of courage 
undaunted; possessing a firmness and perseverance of purpose which 
nothing but impossibilities could divert from its direction; careful as 
a father of those committed to his charge, 3'et steady in the mainte- 
nance of order and discipline ; intimate with the Indian character, 
customs and principles; habituated to the hunting life; guarded by 
exact observation of the vegetables and animals of his own country, 
against losing time in the description of objects already possessed ; 
honest, disinterested, liberal, of sound understanding, and a fidelity 
to truth so scrupulous that whatever he should report M'ould be as 
certain as if seen by ourselves. "With all these qualifications, as if 
selected and implanted by nature in one body for this express pur- 
pose, I could have no hesitation in confiding the enterprise to him. 
To fill up the measure desired, he wanted nothing but a greater 
familiarity with the technical language of the natural sciences, and 
readiness in the astronomical observations necessary for the geog- 
raphy of his route. To acquire these he repaired immediately to 
Philadelphia and placed himself under the tutorage of the distin- 
guished professors of that place, who, with a zeal and emulation 
enkindled by an ardent devotion to science, communicated'to him 



28 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

freely the information requisite for the purposes of his journey. 
Deeming it necessary he should have some person with him of 
known competence to the direction of the enterprise, in the event of 
accident to himself, he proposed William Clarke, brother of General 
George Rogers Clarke, who was approved, and with that view re- 
ceived a commission of captain. 

"In April, 1803, a draught of his instructions was sent to Captain 
Lewis, and on the 5th of July they left Washington and pi'oceeded 
to Pittsburgh, where other articles had been ordered to be provided 
for him. The men, too, were to be selected from the military stations 
on the Ohio. Delays of preparation, difficulties of navigation down 
the Ohio and other untoward obstructions retarded his arrival at 
Cahokia until the season was so far advanced as to render it prudent 
to suspend his entering the Missouri before the ice should break up 
in the succeeding spring. He returned to St. Louis on the 23d of 
September, 1806; never did a similar event excite more joy through 
the United States. 

"It was the middle of February, 1807, before Captain Lewis 
and his companion, Captain Clarke, reached the city of Washington, 
where Congress was then in session. That body granted to the two 
chiefs and their followers the donation of lands which they had been 
encouraged to expect, in reward of their toil and dangers. Captain 
Lewis was soon after appointed Governor of Louisiana and Captain 
Clarke a general of its militia and agent of the United States for 
Indian affairs in the department. A considerable time intervened 
before the Governor' s arrival at St. Louis. He found the territory 
distracted by feuds and contentions among the officers of the Gov- 
ernment, and the people themselves divided by these into factions 
and parties. He determined at once to take no sides with either, 
but to use every endeavor to conciliate and harmonize them. 

"Governor Lewis had been from early life subject to hypochon- 
driacal affections. It was a constitutional disposition in all the 
nearer branches of the family of his name, and was more immedi- 
ately inherited by him from his father. They had not, however, 
been so strong as to give uneasiness to his family while he lived 
with me in Washington. I observed at times sensible depressions 
of mind, but knowing their constitutional source I estimated their 
course by what 1 had seen in the family. During his Western expe- 
dition the constant exertion which that required of all the faculties 
of body and mind, suspended these distressing affections, but after 
his establishment at St. Louis in sedentary occupations they returned 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. - 29 

upon him with redoubled vigor, and began seriously to alarm his 
friends. He was in a paroxysm of one of these when his aflfairs ren- 
dered it necessary for him to go to Washington. He proceeded to 
the Chickasaw bluffs, where he arrived on the 16th of September, 
1809, with a view of continuing his journey thence by water. Mr. 
Xeely, agent of the United States with the Chickasaw Indians, arriv- 
ing there two days after, found him extremely indisposed and betray- 
ing at times some symptons of a derangement of mind. Although 
he appeared somewhat relieved, Mr. Neely kindly determined to ac- 
company and watch over him. Unfortunately at their encampment, 
after having passed Tennessee one daj^'s journey, they lost two 
horses, which obliging Mr Neely to halt for their recovery, the Gov- 
ernor proceeded, under a promise to wait for him at the house of the 
first white inhabitant on his road. He stopped at the house of a Mr. 
Grinder, who not being at home, his wife, alarmed at the symptoms 
of derangement she discovered, gave him up the house and retired 
to rest herself in an out- house, the Governor's and Neely' s servants 
lodging in another. About three o'clock in the night he killed him- 
self, which plunged his friends into affliction and deprived his 
country of one of her most valued citizens, whose valor and intelli- 
gence would have been now employed in avenging the wrongs of his 
country and in emulating by land the splendid deeds which have hon- 
ored her arms on the ocean. It lost, too, to the nation the benefit 
of receiving from his own hand the narrative now offered them of 
his sufferings and successes, of science, and to present to their knowl- 
edge that vast and fertile country which their sons are destined to 
fill with arts, with science, with freedom and happiness. To this 
melancholy close of the life of one, whom posterity will declare not 
to have lived in vain, I have only to add, that all the facts I have 
stated are either known to myself or commiinicated by his family or 
others for whose truth I have no hesitation to make myself respon- 
sible, and 1 conclude with tendering you the assurance of my respect 
and consideration. Thomas Jefferson. 

"Charlottesville, Va., 1813." 



The following sketch is from the Biographical Dictionary of Rev. 
J. L. Blake: 

' ' Meriwether Lewis, Governor of Upper Louisiana, was a native 
of Virginia. From 1801 to 1803 he was the private secretary of 
President Jefferson, who appointed him in 1803 to the command of 



30 ■ GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

the exploring party directed to cross the continent to the Pacific 
ocean. He returned from this expedition in about three years. 
Soon after he returned in 1806 he was made Governor of Louisiana. 
Some difficulty as to his accounts, which distressed him, induced 
him to set out on a journey to Washington. Landing at Chickasaw 
Bluffs, he thence proceeded by land. On the borders of Tennessee, 
about forty miles from Nashville, he committed suicide, October 11, 
1809, aged thirty-five. This event was ascribed to the protest of 
«ome bills which he drew on the public account. He had written an 
account of his expedition up the Missouri and to the Pacific, which 
was published under the care of Paul Allen in two volumes, 8vo. , 
1814, in which appeared his life written by Mr. Jefl'erson." 

Another brief biographical sketch of Meriwether Lewis may be 
found in the "Popular Biography," by Peter Parley, page 362. 

E 6. Mildred, daughter of Robert Lewis, of Belvoir, and Jane 
Meriwether; married John Lewis, a lawyer by profession, of Fred- 
ericksburg, Va., son of Zachary Lewis and his wife, Mary Waller. 

E 7. Sarah, married Dr. Waller Lewis, a brother of John, who 
married her sister Mildred. 

E 8. Mary, married Samuel Cobb, and had issue: Robert Cobb, 
United States Senator from Georgia, and the ancestor of the distin- 
guished Howell Cobb. 

E 9. Elizabeth, married William Basset and had issue, viz. : F 1, 
Anderson Basset, of Richmond, Va. 

E 10. Jane, born 1727, married Thomas Meriwether, her cousin, 
a son of Nicholas Meriwether. Their daughter, F 1, Mary, was 
born in 1763, and died in Harris county, Ga., in 1840. She married 
Richard P. White in 1782, and had five children, viz. : G 1, Thomas 
M. ; G 2, William; G 3, Nicholas; G 4, Clement B; and G 5, Melinda 
Lewis White, who married Pleasant Mhoon Benning. P. M. Ben- 
ning was born October 3, 1783, and died 1845. Melinda Lewis 
White was born April 18, 1789. 

Issue of P. M. Benning and Melinda Lewis White, viz. : F 1, F 2, 
F 3, F 4, F 5 and F 6 died in infancy. 

F 7. Sarah Amanda, died in 1839, 17 j'ears of age. 

F 8. General Henry Lewis Benning, born April 2, 1814; was a 
graduate of Franklin College, at Athens, Ga. He is a lawyer by 
profession ; served one term of six years as one of the judges of the 
Supreme Court of Georgia. During the Confederate war he was a 
Brigadier General, and was assigned to the command of the brigade 
lately commanded by General Toombs. It was composed of the 2d, 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 31 

loth, 17th and 20th Georgia Regiments, and formed part of Hood's 
renowned fighting division. He was married in 1839 to Miss Mary, 
<Iaughter of Colonel Seaborn Jones, of Columbus, Ga., where he 
resides. 

F 9. Richard Edwin Benning, born December 15, 1818; married 
Prances, daughter of Robert Simpson, of Harris county, Ga. 

F 10. Caroline Matilda Benning, born September 28, 1824, and 
married in 1842, Benjamin Yaney Martin, a lawyer and reporter of 
the decisions of the Supreme Court of Georgia. Caroline, his wife, 
died in Augusta, Ga. , in 1858. Benjamin Y. Martin was a cousin of 
Dr. Samuel D. Martin, of Clark county, Ky. 

F 11. Augusta Palmira, born August 18, 1827; married Madison 
Lewis Patterson (a lawyer by profession), on June 30, 1852. He is 
a son of Colonel Edward Patterson and Mildred Lewis, of Spartan- 
burg, S.C. 

Issue of A. P. Benning and her husband, M. L. Patterson, of 
Oswichee, Russell county, Ga. 

G 1. Pleasant Benning Patterson, born July 29, 1856. 

G 2. Edward Morris Patterson, born 1862. 

G 3. Mildred Lewis Patterson, born 1867. 

G 4. Jerome Augustine Patterson, born 1869. 

G 5. Madison Lewis Patterson, born 1870. 

Issue of D 2, Colonel Charles Lewis (son of John and Frances 
Fielding) and his wife, Lucy Taliaferro: 

E 1. Dr. John Taliaferro, a distinguished physician, a graduate of 
Edinburgh College, settled at Mulberry Green, in Culpeper county, 
Va. ; married Hannah Green, of Essex county, and had issue, viz. : 
F 1, Charles Augustine Lightfoot Lewis, married Mary Warner, 
daughter of Captain Charles Augustine Lewis, of Caroline county; 
had issue, viz: G 1, Hannah Green; G 2, Arthur; G 3, Rebecca War- 
ner; G 4, Thomas Fielding; and G 5, Patsy Hunter. 

E 1. Dr. John Taliaferro Lewis, married, December 3, 1782, his 
second wife, Susannah, daughter of Colonel Francis Waring, of 
Goldberry, Essex county, Va. , and had issue, viz. : F 2, Lucy, born 
September 5, 1783, married Colonel John Thorn, of "Berry Hill," 
Culpeper county, and had issue, viz. : G 1, Warner Lewis Thorn, 
who died a minor; G 2, John Catesby Thorn, who married Ada Ma- 
tilda, daughter of John B. Downman, of Fauquier county, and had 
issue, viz. : H 1, Professor William Taylor Thorn, of Hollins Insti- 
tute ; H 2, Lucy Lewis Thorn, who married Colonel William Taylor, 
of Louisiana, and died without issue. An appropriate monument is 



32 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

erected to her memory in Hollywood cemetery, Richmond, Va. F 3,. 
John Lewis, son of Dr. J. T. Lewis and Susannah Waring, married 
his cousin, Fannie Tasker, daughter of Spencer Ball, of Poteci, Prince 
William county, and had issue, viz. : G 1, John Taliaferro Lewis, 
married Rebecca, daughter of Captain Charles Augustine Lewis, of 
Caroline county, no issue; Gr 2, Elizabeth, married Dr. Bowen, of 
Prince William county, and had issue, viz.: H 1, Lucy Lewis. G 2, 
Robert Mottram Bowen, married Carey, daughter of Landon Carter, 
of Prince William county; G 3, Frank Waring, married Fannie, 
daughter of Dr. Stuart, of Prince William county. They reside at 
Poteci, the old family seat, situated on the renowned battle field of 
Manassas, and known as the Lewis House. 

F 4. Warner Lewis, son of Dr. J. T. Lewis and Susan Waring, 
lived at Lewis Level, Essex county, and was a member of the old 
county court of Essex for more than half a century ; was born Decem- 
ber 13, 1786, and died July 14, 1873. He married first, on March 
10, 1810, Ann Susannah, daughter of William Latani, Esq., of Essex 
county, and had issue, viz. : G 1, Thomas Waring Lewis, born August 
15, 1815; married in 1842 Ann Misula, daughter of Henr}' Waring 
Latani, of Essex, and resides at Mansfield, Essex county, Va. 

Issue of G 1, Thomas W. Lewis and A. M. Latani: 

HI. Warner; H 2, Henry Waring Latani; H 3, Ann Susannah; 
H 4, Mary Latani; H 5, Lucy Catesby; H 6, Susan Allen; H 7, 
Joseph; H 8, William Latani; H 9, Catherine; H 10, John Latani; 
H 11, Thomas Deane; and H 12, James Meriwether. 

G 2. William Latani, son of Warner Lewis and Ann Susannah 
Latani, died December 29, 1847; unmarried. 

G 3. John Latani, son of Warner and A. S. Lewis, was born 
January 17, 1820, and married Barbara J., daughter of Philip B. 
Winston, who for many years was the able and popular clerk of 
Hanover county. Issue of John L. Lewis and Barbara Winston: 
H 1, Philip Winston; H 2, Ann Barbara; H 3, Sally Pendleton; H 4, 
W^arner Fielding. 

G 4. Joseph Henry, son of Warner Lewis and A. S. Lewis, born 
June 29, 1822, died November 25, 1850. He was an A. M. grad- 
uate of William and Mary College, and a man of great promise. 
He married Lucy Robinson, daughter of Thomas Lewis Latani and 
Mary Berkeley, of Essex county. They had but one daughter: H 1, 
Mary Josephine, who married Dr. William M. Kirk, of Lancaster 
county, Va. 

F 4. Warner Lewis, of Lewis Level, Essex county, married the. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 33 

second time, December 4, 1823, Catherine, daughter of Major Ru- 
ben Butler, of the Revolution and had issue, viz. : Gr 5, Colonel Mer- 
iwether Lewis, of Lancaster county, born 1827, and died 1883. He 
was State Senator, Colonel of the 9th Virginia Cavalry Regiment, 
C. S. A., was shot through the lungs at Upperville and left in the 
hands of the enemy, who treated him with marked kindness on ac- 
count of his being a member of the Masonic fraternity. He mar- 
ried Julia Ann Sanders, of Lancaster county, and had issue, viz. : 
HI, Harriet Elizabeth; H 2, Dr. Frank Waring Lewis. 

G 6. Robert, son of Warner Lewis and Miss Butler, born 

April 17, 1828; deaf mute. 

G 7. Ann Susannah, born February 11, 1830; married Robert 
Munday, of King William county, and had issue: HI, Dr. Meri- 
wether Munday ; H 2, Lizzie ; H 3, Dr. Benjamin Munday, United 
States Army ; H 4, Ann Lewis, and H 5, Robert Munday. 

G 8. Waring Lewis, born June 24, 1835; was captain of the 
Ninth Virginia Cavalry, Confederate States Army; married Louisa 
H., daughter of Edmond F. Noel, of Essex county, and had issue, 
viz.: HI, Noel; H 2, Lizzie Kate Lewis. 

F 4. Warner Lewis, of Lewis Level, E.ssex county, Va., married 
his third wife August 4, 1836, Maria Isabella, daughter of Henry S. 
Shore, of Richmond, Va. , and had issue, viz.: 

G 9. Catherine Winston, born April, 1837; married Dr. Archie R, 
Rowzie, of Essex county, and had issue, viz.: HI, Jennie Bell; 
H 2, Kate; H 3, Archie R. ; H 4, Phillip Lewis; H 5, James Latani; 
H 6, Frank Waring. 

G 10. Hannah Shore, daughter of Warner Lewis and M. L Shore, 
was born 1839, and married Captain Robert Meriwether Anderson, of 
the Richmond Howitzers, and it may be truly said no nobler, truer or 
braver heart beat in the Confederate cause. He was a nephew of the 
celebrated Meriwether Lewis, of Albemarle county, Va. She had 
issue, viz.: HI, Phillip Lewis Anderson; H2, Warner Meriwether 
Anderson ; H 3, Henry Temple Anderson ; H 4, Robert Maudeville 
Anderson; H 5, Henning Webb Anderson. 

G 11. Phillip Winston Lewis, son of Warner Lewis and M. I. 
Shore, was born June 24, 1841, and fell gallantly in a cavalry charge 
at Manassas, 1863, as his captain said, "cheering at the top of his 
voice. ' ' 

G 12. Lucy Temple, daughter of Warner Lewis and M. I. Shore, 
deaf mute, born September 13, 1844. 

G 13. Catesby Latani Lewis, son of Warner Lewis and M. 1. 
3 



34 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Shore, was born July 4, 1846; married Lucy, daughter of Rev. 
Henry Waring Latani Temple, rector of South Farnham Parish, Es- 
sex county; had issue, viz.: HI, Warner Henry; H 2, John 
Temple. 

G 14. Fielding Lewis, son of Warner Lewis and M. I. Shore, 
born November 21, 1847. 

F 5. Joseph Jones Lewis, son of Dr. John Taliaferro Lewis and 
Ann Susan Waring, was born September 16, 1788, and died 1824. 
He was a man of brilliant parts; resided in Culpeper county and 
never married. 

E 2. Charles Augustine, son of Colonel Charles Lewis and Lucy 
Taliaferro, resided at Millwood, Caroline county, Va. ; was educated 
at William and Mary College, ; was a man of high intelligence, a 
Justice of the Peace and a gallant cavalry officer in the war of 1812; 
married Catherine Battaile, of Caroline county, and had issue, viz. : 
F 1, Mary Warner, who married Charles Augustine Lightfoot Lewis 
as mentioned above. F 2, Charles Augustine, was educated at the 
University of Virginia and was one of the most distinguished and 
successful educators of youth, and was for many years principal of 
Rappahannock Academy. He married Elizabeth Goodwin, the 
widow of Wm. Catesby Woodford, of Caroline county, and had issue, 
viz. : G 1, Bettie Meriwether, who married Professor Rhodes Massie, 
of Richmond College. 

F 3. ' Lawrence Battaile, son of Charles Augustine Lewis and 
Catherine Battaile; married Miss Coleman, of Caroline county, and 
moved to Missouri. 

F 4. Arthur, a captain in the United States Navy; died single. 

F 5. Rebecca, married John Taliaferro Lewis, of Prince William 
county, as mentioned aliove. 

F 6. Elizabeth Battaile ; died single. 

E 3. Mary Warner, only daughter of Colonel Charles Lewis and 
Lucy Taliaferro, was a lady of rare beauty and many attractions; 
she married first. Colonel Phillip Lightfoot, of Sandy Point, on the 
James river, and lived at Cedar Creek, near Port Royal, Caroline 
county, Va., had issue, viz.: Fl, Phillip Lightfooot, of Port Royal, 
who married Sallie, the daughter of William Bernard, of ' ' Mansfield, ' ' 
near Fredericksburg, had issue, viz. : G 1, Fannie, who married Cap- 
tain Robert Gilchrist Robb, of the United States Navy; G 2, Phillip 
Lewis, who married first. Miss Mary Virginia Smith, of Falmouth; 

second, Miss Drummond, of Mississippi; G 3, John Bernard, who 

married Harriet Field, of Gloucester county, Va.. and lives in Port 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 35 

Koyal; G 4, Wm. Bernard, who married first, Roberta, daughter of 
Colonel Robert Beverly, of Blandfield, Essex county; married second 
time, Sarah B. Ross, of Mobile, Ala. ; G 5, Ellen Bankhead, who 
married Dr. Carter Warner Wormly, of King William county; Gr 6, 
Rosalie Virginia, who married Dr. Hugh Morson, of Stafford county. 

E 3. Mrs. Mary Warner Lewis Lightfoot's second marriage was 
with Dr. John Bankhead, a nephew of James Monroe, President of 
the United States, and a graduate of Edinburgh, on May 10, 1787. 
They resided at "Spring Grove," Caroline county, and had issue, 
viz. : F 1, Charles Lewis, born May 3, 1788, who married first, Ann 
Cary, a daughter of Colonel Thomas Mann Randolph, and grand- 
daughter of Thomas Jefferson, September 17, 1808, and had issue, 
viz.: G 1, John Warner Bankhead, born December 2, 1810; G 2, 

Ellen Monroe, born September 5, 1813, who married a Mr. 

Carter, of Albemarle county, and died leaving issue ; G 3, Thomas 
Mann Randolph, born December 30, 1815, and moved to Arkansas. 

F 1. Charles Lewis Bankhead married second time, Mary A. 
Carthrae, a grand-daughter of Thomas Lewis, brother of General 
Andrew Lewis, and in their only son, G 1, Charles Lewis Bankhead, 
who resides in Orange county and who married his cousin, Mary 
Warner Bankhead, are united the eastern and western branches of 
the Virginia Lewises. 

F 2. John, son of Dr. John Bankhead and Mary Warner Lewis, 

married Ann Eliza Stuart, of King George county, Va., Septem- 

'ber 26, 1816, and had issue, viz. : G 1, Mary Eliza, born July 16, 

1817, married Mr. Wallace, of Fauquier county, Va. ; G 2, 

Rosalie, born December 1, 1818, married Lucien Dade, of Fauquier 
-county. 

F 3. William, son of Dr. John Bankhead and M. W. Lewis, in- 
herited the family seat, "Spring Grove," Caroline county, and 
married Dorothea Bayne, daughter of Garrett Minor, Esq. , of Fred- 
ericksburg, October 15, 1829; they had issue, viz.: G 1, Georgiana 
B., born August 26, 1830; married William Moncure, of Stafford 
county; G2, Mary Warner, born September 26, 1831, married her 
cousin, Charles Lewis Bankhead, of Orange county, as above men- 
tioned; G3, John Taliaferro, born July 18, 1833; G 4, Eliza Garrett, 
born January 22, 1835, married Bickerton L. Winston, of ILanover 
county; G 5, Rosalie Stuart, born October 28, 1836, married Richard 
Morris Winston, of Hanover county ; G 6, Ellen Bayne, born Ma}' 
7, 1838, married Colonel John Lee, of Stafford county, a grandson 
of Light-Horse Harry, and a brother of the gallant Fitzhugh, now 



A>i KA noQ 



36 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

(1886) Governor of Virginia; G 7, Leonora D., born February 9, 
1840, married the Rev. Mr. Meredith, of Stafford county, Va. 

Colonel Charles Lewis, of Fredericksburg, who married Lucy 
Taliaferro, was in the disastrous defeat of General Braddock on Jul}- 
9, 1755. During the fall of 1755 an army was organized to defend 
the frontier settlements against the eruptions of the Indians. 
Colonel Charles Lewis accompanied this expedition as a captain of 
one of the companies and kept a journal, giving in detail the inci- 
dents that occurred during their march from Fredericksburg to Fort 
Cumberland. For a copy of said journal, which we here present to 
the reader, we are indebted to the courtesy of Thomas W. Lewis, of 
Essex county, Va. , a great-grandson of Colonel Charles Lewis. 

JOURNAL. 

October 10, 1755. — Left Fredericksburg under the command of Major 
Andrew Lewis with eighty men; crossed Rappahannock at the Falls, the 
men being, most of them, drunk. We marched but seven miles to Picketts; 
verj' bad entertainment, no water to be had for the soldiers ; this night two 
of my company deserted. The expense, 4s. 5^d. — 7 miles. 

October 11. — This daj' I was ordered to march before the company to 
one Martin Hardin's to provide provisions. I shot a bullock and provided 
a plenty of bread. In the evening the company came up in high spirits; 
here we had good entertainment, a merry landlady and daughter; expense, 
6s. 2d.— 18 miles. 

October 12. — This day Major Lewis and Captain H. Woodward went 
before to provide for the company and left me the command of the men ; 
took on the march a deserter and drunken schoolmaster. Arrived in the 
evening at Nevils ; bread very scarce. Lieutenant Lowry sent to purchase 
meal and potatoes. We made a good shift — 18 miles. 

October 13.— Marched from Nevils and crossed the ridge at Ashley's 
Gap. I was this day sent forward to provide for the men — provisions 
plenty. This day's march was tedious, being cold and rainy and the men 
very ill-clothed. They came up with me about eight o'clock at night very 
much fatigued, having marched, this day, 25 miles. 

October 14.— This day we marched cheerfully, having but eighteen 
miles to Winchester. We arrived about three o'clock, and joined the Hon. 
George Washington, Commander of Virginia Regiment, and Captain 
George Mercer, A. D. C, with other officers and about forty men — 18 miles. 

From Fredericksburg seven miles to Picketts ; Picketts eighteen miles 
toHardlns; Hardins eighteen miles to Nevils ; Nevils twenty-five mile to 
Woods; Woods eighteen miles to Winchester — 86 miles from Fredericks- 
burg to Winchester. 

October 15. — Viewed the town. 

October 16.— Rested. 

October 17. — Rainy and very unpleasant weather. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 37 

October 18. — Ordered to make ready for marching to Fort Cumberland. 
October 19.— Made ready. This day we had a remarkable battle be- 
tween two of our servants. 

October 20. — We left Winchester under the command of Major Andrew 
Lewis, and marched ten miles to Captain Smith's, a very remarkable man. 
1 was this day appointed captain over forty-one men of different com- 
panies ; a remarkable dispute between Lieutenant Steinberger and an Irish 
woman — 10 miles. 

October 21.— Marched from Captain Smith's and crossed Great Cape 
Capon, a beautiful prospect and the best land I ever yet saw. We en- 
camped this night on the top of a mountain. The roads, by far, were the 
worst this day, and our march was for that reason but thirteen miles. Our 
men, nevertheless, were in high spirits. About eight o'clock this night 
a soldier's musket went off in middle of our encampment without any 
<lamage. I think I saw this day some of the most delightful prospects I 
<'ver did — 13 miles. 

October 22. — This day we marched from Sandy Top Mountain to Little 
■Cape Capon; the land very good. We encamped this night at a poor man's 
house entirely forsaken and the people drove off by the Indians. We found 
here plenty of corn, oats and stock of all kinds; even the goods and furni- 
ture of the house were left behind. This night, about nine o'clock, we 
were joined by the Hon. Colonel George Washington and Captain George 
Mercer, A. D. C. — 15 miles. 

October 23. — Very bad weather, snow and rain. We marched very 
slowly to-day and arrived at the South Branch, where we encamped at a 
house on the Branch, having come up with Colonel Washington and Cap- 
tain George Mercer, A. D. C. — 9 miles. Very ill-natured people here. 

October 24. — A very wet day. We marched to Patterson's creek, on 
which we encamped in a deserted house. We found here good corn, wheat 
and pasturage. Before we marched we discharged our pieces, being wet, 
and charged them in expectation of seeing the enemy. Colonel Washing- 
ton marched before with Captain Ashley's company of Rangers — 14 miles. 

October 25. — Marched from Patterson's creek and passed many deserted 
houses. I was this day very curious in the examination of the mischief 
<lone in the houses, and was shocked at the havoc made by the barbarous 
and cruel Indians. At one, Mecraggin's, I found the master of the family, 
who had been buried but slightly by his friends, after his assassination, half 
out of the grave and eaten by the wolves; the house burnt, the cornfield 
laid waste and an entire ruin made. At half-past six we arrived at Fort 
Cumberland cold and hungry. We had this day, by Major Lewis' order, 
two women ducked for robbing the deserted houses — 20 miles. Eighty-one 
miles to Fort Cumberland and one hundred and sixty- seven miles from 
Fredericksburg. 

October 26. — This day Lieutenant Walter Stuart showed me the Fort. 
It is a quadrangular fort with four bastions, about four hundred feet in the 
.square ; has eleven four-pounders and two smaller mounted. It is situated 
on the north side of Potomac, in Maryland, on a hill very pleasant, more 
so, I think, than advantageous; has a romantic prospect from the moun- 



38 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

tain, and is very healthy. I was this day ordered to return to Fredericks- 
burg, but my horse being tired, I was excused. 

October 27, 38, 29 and 30.— Nothing remarkable. 

October 31. — An Irishman arrived at the fort with two scalps. It seems 
he was, the Sunday before, taken prisoner by a party of fifty-two Indians, 
and being left in custody of two while the party proceeded toward the 
inhabitants, he, with his guard, arrived at the Shanoe camp, and encamped 
in a deserted house. About eleven o'clock he was ordered to make up the 
fire, but refusing so to do, was threatened the tomahawk, but accidentally 
casting his eye on an axe in the house, very convenient to him, he, with it, 
beat out the brains of the Indian next to him, and with his gun shot the 
other through the body. Having escaped them he made the best of his 
way to Fort Cumberland with their scalps, guns, horses, etc. I bought one 
of the guns for fifty shillings, Maryland currency, being a French piece,, 
very handsome and equally good. This same day a party of volunteers, 
consisting of one hundred men, rank and file, and eight officers, were de- 
feated. The Indians having disclosed their designs to Mclrvain, their 
prisoner, it is not doubted the party will cut them olf. 

November 1, 3, 3. — Nothing remarkable. 

November 4. — The volunteers returned without success; the Indians 
being supposed to have returned. 

November 13. — Colonel Stevens arrived this day with about one hundred 
recruits with their proper officers : Captains Robert Spotswood ana William 
Peachy ; Lieutenants John Hall and King ; two volunteers. 

November 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19.— Nothing material. 

November 30. — Ensign Bacon arrived at the fort from Patterson's creek, 
where he had been to erect a fort. On his waj' he heard the Indian halloO' 
and saw many tracks of Indians in the woods. This alarmed the fort, but 
being late it was not possible to send out a party, but orders were given for 
one hundred men to parade in the morning under Captain Waggoner. 

November 31. — A very bad morning, it still continuing to rain. A party 
of one hundred men paraded under Captain Waggoner to search for the In- 
dians on Patterson's creek, according to Ensign Bacon's information of the 
day before. Major Andrew Lewis and myself Avent volunteers on the com- 
mand. We returned the same day with the party; no Indians or tracks of 
Indians to be seen. 

November 23. — A very cold day and windy. 

November 23, 34, 35. — Nothing remarkable. 

November 36. — I went out on this day in companj' with Major James 
Livingston, Lieutenant Starke, one sergeant, a corporal and three privates 
to Nicholas' Fort on a party of pleasure. It is about five miles from Fort 
Cumberland, well built, with four bastions. About one o'clock we left this 
fort and marched one mile below, where we crossed the Potomac river in a 
canoe. I went on the south side of the river into a house where there was a 
weaver's loom and the small quantity of the shavings of a wood the people 
in these parts dye with. Some distance from this house we found in the 
Indian path about two pounds of swan-shot, supposed by our guide to be 
dropped there by the Indians in some hurry when thej' massacred the in- 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



39 



habitants about these plantations. We crossed a small mountain not far 
from this on whose top you might drop a stone four hundred feet into the 
Potomac river. We passed another mountain something higher — had much 
the same prospect. A fine landscape from the top of this mountain ; you 
might drop a stone above five hundred feet perpendicular into the Potomac 
river. We found here an Indian cap made of bear skin, and then we pro- 
ceeded on our march to the new store built by the Ohio Company, from 
whence we crossed the Potomac river, and before night got into Fort Cum- 
berland. This march fatigued me very much, being above fifteen miles, 
and a great part of it over the mountains. 
November 27. — A very fine, warm day. 



An exact list of officers and their ranks belonging to the Virginia regi- 
ment : 

Commanded by the Honorable George Washington. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Adam Stevens, 
Major Andrew Lewis. 



CAPTAINS. 



1. Peter Hogg, 

2. George Mercer, 

3. Thomas Waggoner, 

4. Robert Stewart, 

5. Thomas Cock, 

6. John Savage, 

7. William Branaugh, 

8. John Mercer, 



9. Joshua Lewis, 

10. Henry Woodward, 

11. Robert Spotswood, 

12. Carter Harrison, 

13. Charles Lewis, 

14. William Peachy, 

15. David Bell, 

16. Robert McKenzie. 



LIEUTENANTS. 



1. John McNeil, 

2. William Starke, 

3. Thomas Bullitt, 

4. Walter Stewart, 

5. John Blagg, 

6. Hancock Eustice, 

7. George Frazer, 

8. John Edward Lomax, 



9. Peter Steinberger, 

10. John Williams, 

11. Augustine Brockenbrough, 

12. John Campbell, 

13. John Hall, 

14. John Lowrj', 

15. John King, 

16. James Baker. 



1. Mordecai Buckner, 

2. John Poison, 

3. William Dangerfield, 

4. Edward Hubbard, 

5. John Dean, 

6. Nathaniel Milner, 

7. William Flemming, 



8. Lenard Price, 

9. Nathaniel Thompson, 

10. Thomas Carter, 

11. Charles Smith, 

12. Lee Hussie DeKeger, 

13. George Gordon, 

14. George Weaden. 

Per Charles Lewis. 



40 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

November 30. — This day a man unfortunately falling down the bank of 
the Potomac river opposite the fort, his gun fired and shot a soldier through 
the leg who was crossing the river in a canoe. 

December 2. — Captain Spotswood and self went out as volunteers with 
a party commanded by Ensign Winter Targie to gather corn from the de- 
serted fields. We arrived about two o'clock at the plantation of one Crisseps, 
most delightfully situated on land that gave me great pleasure. It was a 
piece of low ground entirely surrounded by the mountains, the prospect 
very romantic, high rocks on the sides of the mountains some hundreds 
of feet perpendicular to the Potomac river. Here we lodged this night in 
a comfortable house. 

December 3. — This morning we took our guns, and after directing our 
men (thirty in number) to gather the corn, we took different courses to 
hunt for deer and such game as the place afforded. This evening Captain 
Spotswood went with a soldier to the plantation of one Williams, where the 
houses were burnt by the savages. The body of a woman laid near one of 
the houses, her head being scalped; and, also, a small boy and a young man. 
This horrid scene gave us a terrible shock, but I hope with the leave of 
God we shall still overcome the cruel, barbarous and inhuman enemj'. 

December 4. — This morning we intended to hunt again, but soon after 
day we heard three distinct guns under the Alleghany mountains, therefore 
we were particularly cautious not to venture too far to hunt, lest we should 
be outwitted by our ever cautious enemy. 

December 5. — This morning we marched to Fort Cumberland, and met, 
about five miles from Crisseps', a relief commanded by Lieutenant Lynn, of 
twelve men. We accepted of this relief and gave up our command to Mr. 
Lynn, according to order. 

December G. — Five deserters were this day punished, each receiving one 
thousand la.shes. In this last command I may with the greatest truth 
aver that I saw the most horrid, shocking sight I ever yet beheld. At a 
house adjoining the cornfield in which our soldiers were ever employed in 
gathering corn, we saw the bodies of three different people, who were first 
massacred, then scalped, and afterward thrown into a fire. These bodies 
were not yet quite consumed, but the flesh on many parts of them. We 
saw the clothes of these people yet bloody, and the stakes, the instruments 
of their death, still bloody and their brains sticking to them. The orchards 
all down, the mills destroyed and a waste of all manner of household goods. 
These people in my opinion were very industrious, having the best corn I 
ever saw, and their plantation well calculated for produce, and every other 
conveniency suitable to the station of a farmer. 

December 24. — Being Christmas, we were invited to spend the evening 
-with Colonel Stephens, where we spent the time in drinking loyal healths 
and dancing till eleven o'clock, and then yiarted in the most amicable 
manner. 

December 25. — Were invited to dine with Colonel Stephens, where we 
had the most sumptuous entertainment. After dinner, drank the royal 
health and sang some entertaining songs, with three huzzas and rolls of 
drum to every health and song; then took partners and spent the evening 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 41 

in dancing, and about twelve o'clock broke up, well pleased with our gen- 
erous entertainment. 

December 26. — Socially spent. 

December 27.— I was ordered to march with one subordinate, one ser- 
geant, one corporal and twenty men to take the command of Ashley's Fort; 
arrived about five o'clock. Met Captain Ashley near the barracks, in- 
quired his number of men and desired to see his list. He informed me he 
did not know the number and that his lieutenant had the list and was ab- 
sent. I ordered the drum to beat to arms, when, with much difficulty, we 
got together twenty-one men. I appointed Lieutenant John Bacon adjutant, 
had the articles of war read to the men and let them know I was to com- 
mand them. Mr. Bacon made a most affectionate speech to them and then 
discharged them for the night. They seemed to be mutinous, but were 
soon convinced, after reading orders from Colonel Adam Stephens, that I 
was to command them. I gave orders to parade. 



B 2. Issue of Major William Lewis, of Chamokins, St. Peter's 
Parish, New Kent county, Va. , viz. : 

C 1. Colonel Charles, married Mary Howell, and had issue, viz. : 

E 1. John, born October 8, 1720. 

E 2. Charles, born March 14, 1721; died May 14, 1782; married 
Mary, daughter of Isham Randolph, of " Dungenness. " 

E 3. Elizabeth, born April 23, 1724; married William Kennon, 
May 3, 1744. 

E 4. James, born October 6, 1726; died May 1, 1764. 

E 5. Mary, born April 26, 1729; died January 12, 1733. 

E 6. Howell, born September 13, 1731; married and had issue: 
F 1, Thomas Fielding, of Albemarle county, Va., etc. 

E 7. Anne, born March 2, 1733. 

E 8. Second Mar}', born September 25, 1736; died April 26, 1740. 

E 9. Robert, born May 29, 1739; married, February 26, 1790, 
Jane Woodson. 

E 10. Frances, born August 1, 1744; married Septembers, 1760. 

Issue of Charles Lewis and Mary Randolph: 

F 1. Colonel Charles, of " Bucke3'e Land," lived afterwards at 
' ' Mount Eagle, ' ' about eight miles from Charlottesville, on the Ri- 
vanna river. He married Lucy, daughter of Peter Jefferson and 
sister of the President, and had issue, viz. : 

G 1. Randolph, married his cousin Mary, daughter of Robert 
Lewis, of the "Byrd, " and Jane Woodson. They had issue, viz.: 

H 1. Lilburn, emigrated to the West. 

H 2. Tucker Woodson, emigrated to the West. 



42 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

H 3. Randolph, emigrated to the West. 

H 4. Howell, married a sister of Hancock Lee, of Richmond, Va. 

H 5. Warner, died unmarried. 

H 6. Mary J. , married Charles Palmer, of Richmond, Va. 

H 7. Susan Harrison, married William H. Douthat, of Botetourt 
county, Va. 

H 8. Lucy Jefferson. 

Issue of Charles Palmer and H 6, Mary J. Lewis: 

I 1. Dr. William P., Surgeon Confederate States Army, edited 
" Calendar of Virginia State Papers," unmarried; 1 2, Charles; 1 3> 
Randolph ; I 4, Richard C. ; and I 5, Catharine C. 

Issue of William H. Douthat and Susan Harrison Lewis, viz. : • 

1 1. Robert Lewis; I 2, Charles L. ; 1 3, Henry; I 4, Fielding L. ;, 
I 5, Warner ; 1 6, Mary ; I 7, Sarah ; I 8, Annie ; and I 9, Susan. 

Issue of Robert Lewis, born 1739, and Jane Woodson: 

F 1. Howell, born November 18, 1760. 

F 2. Robert, born March 26, 1763. 

F 3. Charles, born June 25, 1765. 

F 4. James, born January 6, 1768. 

F 5. John Woodson, born May 27, 1770. 

F 6. Sarah, born June 8, 1772. 

F 7. Mary Howell, born December 25, 1774; married Randolph 
Lewis, son of Charles and his wife, Lucy Jefferson, sister of the 
President. 

F 8. Warner, Sr., born May 2, 1777, died 1819; married June 11, 
1798. Sarah Pleasants Woodson emigrated in 1818 to St. Louis, 
county, Mo. 

F 9. Elizabeth, born August 14, 1779; died in infancy. 

F 10. Elizabeth, born July 24, 1782. 

F 11. Fielding, born October 20, 1788. 

Issue of Warner Lewis, Sr., of 1777, and Sarah Pleasants Wood- 
son, viz. : 

G 1. Robert, born May 9, 1799. 

G 2. Charles, born February 4, 1801. 

G 3. Samuel AVoodson, born February 22, 1803; married Miss 
Bates. Issue, viz.: HI, daughter; married Charles Rankin. 

G 4. Warner, Jr., born November 28, 1804. Settled, in 1827, in 
Dubuque, Iowa. 

G 5. Sarah P., born August 8, 1806. 

G 6. Robert, born March 8, 1808, died 1875; married, December 
29, 1829, Lucy B. Bacon, of Clinton, Mo. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 43. 

Gr 7. James Howell, born November 18, 1809. 
Gr 8. Jane, born November 20, 1811; married twice, first to Mr. 
— Farguson, second to Colonel Talbott. 



G 9. John, born July 4, 1813. 

G 10. Elizabeth, born July 1, 1814; married Captain Kobert 
Freeland. 

G 11. William Price, born June 4, 1816. 

G 12. Annie, born May 11, 1818. 

G 13. John Pleasants Woodson, born August 27, 1819. 

Issue of Robert Lewis and Lucy B. Bacon, viz. : 

H 1. Elvira Farguson. 

H 2. Warner, Colonel Confederate States Army; commanded a 
regiment in the Trans-Mississippi Department. 

H 3. Annie, died. 

H 4. Jane, died. 

H 5. Ann E. Freeland. 

H 6. Garland Bacon, soldier. Confederate States Army, killed at 
the siege of Vicksburg. 

H 7. Sarah L. ; H 8, Lucy B. ; H 9. Robert, died; H 10, Louisa; 
and H 11, Samuel Woodson. 

D 3. Colonel Fielding Lewis, son of Captain John, Jr., of War- 
ner Hall, and his wife, Frances Fielding, removed to Fredericksburg, 
Va. , in early life. He was a merchant of high standing, a vestry- 
man, magistrate and Burgess. During the Revolutionary war, be- 
ing a genuine patriot, superintended the manufacture of arms in the 
neighborhood. As before mentioned, he was twice married ; first to 
Catherine Washington, a cousin of General George, and sister of the 
older Warner Washington, in 1746. His second wife was Betty, a 
sister of General George Washington. 

Issue of D 3, Colonel Fielding Lewis, by his first wife, Catherine 
Washington, viz. : 

E 1. John, born 1747; married five times. 

E 2. Francis, born 1748; died in childhood, 

E 3. Warner, died in childhood. 

E 1. John, son of Colonel Fielding Lewis by his first wife, was 
born in 1747; his uncle John Lewis and Charles Dick, godfathers; 
Mrs. Mary Washington and Mrs. Lee, godmothers. He was a grad- 
uate of Oxford College, England, and died in Logan county, Ky. 
He was five times married, viz. : 

First — To Lucy Thornton. 

Second — To Elizabeth, daughter of Gabriel Jones. 



44 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Third — To a Miss Jones, wlio died childless. 

Fourth — To the widow of Bowles Armistead, whose maiden name 
was Mary Ann Fontaine, and 

Fifth— To Mrs. Mercer, nee Carter. 

Issue of E 1, John and Lucy Thornton, viz. : 

F 1. Mildred, married William Minor, of Virginia. 

Issue of E 1, John and Elizabeth Jones, viz. : 

F 2. Gabriel, born 1775; married in 1807, Mary Bibb, of Logan 
county, Ky. He was a practical surveyor and was sent to Kentucky 
by his father to locate lands, etc. They had issue, viz. : 

G 1. John, married in 1830, Mary Martin. 

G 2. Elizabeth, married Samuel McDowel Starling, and had 
issue, viz. : 

H 1. Mary, married Mr. Payne, of Hopkinsville, Ky. ; H 2, 

Lewis ; H 3, Thomas ; H 4 George ; H 5, Fielding ; H 6, Anna. 

Issue of E 1, John Lewis, by Mrs. Armistead, his fourth wife, viz. : 

F 1. Fannie; F 2, Howell, and F 3, Mary Ann, who married Mr. 
Dillard, of Logan county, Ky. 

F 1. Fannie, married Keeling Terrell, and had issue, viz. : 

G 1. Mary Frances Lewis, of Quitman, Miss. ; G 2, William 
Armistead ; G 3, John ; G 4, Mrs. Narcissa Smith, of Quitman, Miss. , 
and G 5, Mrs. William B. Trotter, of Quitman, Miss. Keeling Terrell 
was a lawyer and was killed in a duel. 

Issue of E 1, John Lewis, by Mrs. Mercer, his fifth wife, viz. : 

F 1. Otway, who died in childhood. 

E 2. Frances, daughter of Colonel Fielding Lewis and his first 
wife, born November 25, 1748; Fielding Lewis and George Wash- 
ington, godfathers; Miss Hannah Washington and Mrs. Jackson, 
godmothers. 

E 2. Frances, married Mr. Waugh and died childless. 

E 3. Warner, son of Colonel Fielding Lewis, born November 29, 

1749, his uncle, Mr. Lewis, and Captain B. Seaton, godfathers; 

and Mrs. Mildred Seaton, godmother. He died in infancy. Mrs. 
Catherine Lewis died February, 1749. 

Issue of D 3, Colonel Fielding Lewis, Sr., by Betty Washington, 
his second wife, viz. : 

E 4. Fielding, Jr., born February 14, 1751, his uncle, George 
Washington, and Robert Jackson, godfathers; and Mrs. Mary Wash- 
ington and Mrs. Frances Thornton, godmothers. He held a high 
place in society, and was considered one of the fathers of Virginia 
agriculture. His portrait may now be seen by the side of John 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 45 

Taj-lor' s, of Caroline county, and other distinguished farmers in the 
agricultural rooms in the city of Richmond, placed there by order of 
the Agricultural Society of Virginia. He married and died in Fairfax 
county, Va. , leaving no male descendants, but several daughters, viz. : 

F 1. Catherine, his daughter, married Henry Chew Dade. 

F 2. Lucinda, married Gilson Foote in 1814, and others, that 
married Thomas Marshall, son of Chief Justice Marshall, Mr. 
Douthat and Mr. Coke. 

F 1. Mrs. Catherine Dade in her early life became the ward of 
her uncle, Lawrence Lewis (husband of Eleanor Parke Custis), and 
much of her childhood was spent at Mount Vernon. In 1809 she 
married Henr^' Chew Dade, and in 1835 moved with him to Noxubee 
county, Miss. Their children are, viz. : 

G 1. Elizabeth "\V., who married James L. Dabney and moved 
to Texas about 1845. 

G 2. Henry Chew, also moved to Texas. 

G 3. Robert Fielding, died. 

G 4. Lee Masse}*, died. 

G 5. Frances Huger, married Miss Gray, a sister of Henry Gray, 
of Louisiana, and moved to Marshall, Texas. 

G 6. Lucinda Frances, married Judge H. W. Foote, of Macon, 
Miss., where she died in 1855, leaving seven children. H. W. Foote 
has been Judge of the Circuit Court, a member of the Legislature, 
and is one of the most distinguished lawyers of the State. 

Mrs. Lucinda Frances Foote left seven children, viz. : 

HI. Ann, married Dr. Early C. 'Clements, of Sharky county, 
Miss. 

H 2. Catherine Lewis, married T. J. Patty, of Macon, Miss. 

H 3. AVilliam H. , married Mary Sellac, now of Louisville, Ky. 

H 4. Henry Dade, married Susan C. Walker, now of Columbus, 
Miss. 

H. 5. Thomas, married Anna Allen, of Virginia, now in Noxubee 
county, Miss. 

H 6. Huger Lee, married Kate Shelby; resides in Sharkey county, 
Miss. 

H 7. Emmie, married H. M. Pattj^; resides in Atlanta, Ga. 

F 2. Lucinda, second daughter of the second Fielding Lewis, 
who married Gilson Foote in 1814; left five children, viz. : 

G 1. Fielding, died single. 

G 2. Robert, died single. 

G 3. George, married Miss Spooner and died without issue. 



46 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Gr 4. Sarah, married J. M. Grant and died. 

G 5. Mary, married Judge H. W. Foote as his second wife and 
left one daughter: H 1, Mary Frances, who married T. T. Patty, of 
Macon, Miss. Judge H. W. Foote' s children are grandchildren of 
Catherine Lewis Dade and Lucinda Lewis Foote; great-grandchil- 
dren of Fielding Lewis, Jr. ; great-great-grandchildren of Colonel 
Fielding Lewis, Sr. , and Betty, the sister of General George Wash- 
ino-ton, and great-great-grandnephews and nieces of General George 
Washington. 

Judge Foote has autograph letters from Bushrod Washington and 
Lawrence Lewis, executors of Washington' s estate ; also several state- 
ments from the same to "the heirs of Fielding Lewis, in account 
with the estate of George Washington," a few pieces of the quaint 
old Lewis silver engraved with the initials, " F. L," and a miniature 
portrait of Betty Washington' s husband, Colonel Fielding Lewis. 

E 5. Augustine, son of Fielding Lewis, born January 22, 1752; 
his uncle, Charles Lewis and Charles Washington, godfathers ; his 
aunt, Lucy Lewis and Mrs. Mary Taliaferro, godmothers.. He died 
aged four years. 

E 6. Warner, born June 24, 1755; his uncle, Charles Washing- 
ton, and Colonel John Thornton, godfathers ; Mrs. Mildred Thornton 
and Mrs. Mary Willis, godmothers. He died young. 

E 7. George W., born March 14, 1757; Charles Yates and Lewis 
Willis, godfathers; Mrs. Mary Dick and his mother, godmothers. 
He was a captain in Colonel George Baylor's regiment of cavalry 
■during the Revolutionary war, and commander of General Washing 
ton's life-guard. In his arms General Mercer expired on the field 
of battle at Princeton. Toward the close of the war he married 

Miss Dangerfield; lived in Berryville, Clarke county, Va., in 

Fredericksburg, and in King George county ; died at his seat, ' ' Mar- 
mion," in 1831. He enjoyed the highest confidence of General 
Washington, being sent by him on a secret expedition of great im- 
portance to Canada. He left issue, viz. : F 1, Mary Lewis; married 
Colonel Byrd Willis. 

F 2. Dangerfield Lewis, married and left issue, viz. : G 1, Cathe- 
rine D., who married Henry C. Dade, whose daughter, Lucinda Dade, 
married Judge H. W. Foote, of Macon, Miss. 

F 3. Samuel. 

Colonel Byrd Willis left issue, viz. : G 1, Lewis; G 2, Mrs. Murat; 
G3, Colonel George Willis; G 4, Mrs. Commodore Dallas; and G 5, 
Mrs. General Thomas Botts, etc. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 47 

E 8. Mary, daughter of Colonel Fielding Lewis; Samuel and 
Lewis Washington, godfathers; Mrs. Washington and Mary Thorn- 
ton, godmothers. She died in infancy. 

E 9. Charles, born October 3, 1760; Colonel George Washington 
4ind Roger Dixon, godfathers; Mrs. Martha Washington and Mrs. 
Lucy Dixon, godmothers. He died in infancy. 

E 10. Samuel, born May 14, 1763; Rev. Musgrave Dawson and 
Joseph Jones, godfathers; Mrs. Dawson and Mrs. Jones, godmothers. 

E 11. Bettie, born February 23, 1765; Rev. Mr. Kice and Warner 
Washington, godfathers ; Mrs. Harriet Washington and 3Iiss Frances 
Lewis, godmothers. She married Charles Carter and had issue. 

E 12. Lawrence, son of Colonel Fielding Lewis, born April 4, 
1767; Charles Washington and Francis, godfathers; Mrs. May Dick, 
godmother. He resided at Woodlawn, near Mt. Vernon. He was 
aid to General Morgan in his expedition to the West to quell an in- 
surrection in Pennsylvania. He was the adopted son and executor 
of the will of General Washington. He married Eleanor Parke 
Custis, daughter of Washington Parke Custis, the granddaughter 
and adopted child of Mrs. George Washington. He left posterity 
in part, viz.: F 1, Lorenzo, married and left posterity; F 2, Law- 
rence, married a Miss Coxe, of Philadelphia; F 3, Frances Parke, 

married Mr. Butler, of Louisiana ; F 4, a daughter, married Mr. 

Conrad, of New Orleans, La. ; F 5, Washington, resided near 

Berryville, Clarke county, Va. He has many of the old family por- 
traits, among them those of Colonel Fielding Lewis and his second 
wife, Betty Washington. 

E 13. Robert, son of Colonel Fielding Lewis, born June 25, 
1769; George Thornton and Peter Marye, godfathers; Miss Mildred 
Willis and Mrs. Ann Lewis, godmothers. He was the private sec- 
retary of General Washington during a part his presidential term. 

He married a Miss Brown and settled in Fredericksburg in 1791, 

where he acted as mayor of the town and was a member of the 
Episcopal church. His daughter, F 1, Judith, married Rev. Edward 
C. McGuire, of Fredericksburg, Va. ; F 2, another daughter, married 
George W. Basset, of Richmond, Ya. 

E 14. Howell, son of Colonel Fielding Lewis, born December 12, 
1771; Joseph Jones and James Mercer, godfathers; Miss Mary and 
Miss Milly Dick, godmothers. He married Miss Pollard and died in 
Kanawha county, Va. , leaving posterity, viz.: F 1, Mrs. Frances 
Lewis Gwathney, of Richmond, Va., etc. 

Issue of D 4, Warner Lewis (son of John, of ' ' Warner Hall, ' ' 



48 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Gloucester county, Va.), who married Eleanor, widow of William, 
son of Sir William Gooch, Governor of Virginia, and daughter of 
James Bowles, of Maryland, viz. : 

E 1. Warner, married first, Mary Chiswell (issue, two sons and 
two daughters); second, Mary Fleming (issue, two sons and two 
daughters). 

E 2. Fielding, married Agnes, daughter of William Harwood. 

E 3. James, married. 

E 4. John, born November 8, 1754. 

E 5. Addison, married Susan Fleming, sister of Mary, who mar- 
ried his brother, Warner. 

E 6. Thomas, married Nancy Harwood, sister of Agnes, who 
married his brother, Fielding ; no issue. 

E 7. Rebecca, born 1759; married Dr. Robert Innis; no issue. 

Issue of E 1, Warner Lewis and Mary Chiswell; first marriage, 
viz. : 

F 1. John, married Sarah Griffin; no issue. 

F 2. Warner, married Courtenay Norton, daughter of J. H. Nor- 
ton and his wife, Anne Nicholas. 

F 3. Eleanor, married first, John Fox; second, Augustus Oliver, 
a refugee from San Domingo. 

F 4. Elizabeth, never married. 

Issue of Warner Lewis and Mary Fleming, second marriage: 

F 5. Caroline, married Charles Barrett; no issue. 

F 6. Julia, married Thomas Throckmorton, of Williamsburg, Va. 

F 7. Philip Warner, never married. 
' Issue of Warner Lewi-s and Courtenay Norton, viz, : 

G 1. Mary Criswell, married John Peyton, of Gloucester. They 
had a daughter that married Mr. Marshall, of Fauquier county. 

G 2. Elizabeth, married Dr. Brooke, and had issue, viz. : 

H 1, Elizabeth, married Mr. Marshall, a nephew of the Chief 

Justice. 

H 2. Courtenay Warner, married Mr. Seldon, of Gloucester. 

One of Mrs. Courtenay W. Seldon' s daughters married Charles 
H. Dimmock, and one of her sons was a surgeon in the Confederate 
States Army. 

H 3. Mary L^wis Brooke, married her cousin. Dr. Samuel Powell 
Byrd. 

Issue of Eleanor Lewis by her first marriage with John Fox, viz. : 

G 1. John W. , married Mary F. Ball and died in Gloucester, 
leaving issue : HI, John; H 2, Maria. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 49 

Gr 2. Eliza Lewis, married Dr. George D. Baylor, of New Market, 
Caroline county, and had issue: H 1, John Norton; H 2, Ellen 
Augustus; H 8, Frances Courtenay; H 4, Warner Lewis; H 5, Julia 
Ann ; H 6, Thomas Wiltshire ; H 7, Louisa Henrietta ; H 8, Alexan- 
der GTalt; and H 9, George R. 

Issue of Eleanor Lewis by her second marriage with Augustus 
Oliver, viz. : 

G 3. Warner Lewis. 

G 4. Margaret Pattison, never married. 

G 5. Mary Augustus, married John Fox Whiting and had issue, 
viz.: HI, Margaret; H 2, Indiana; H 3, Fulton; H 4, Clarence, of 
Norfolk. 

Issue of Fielding Lewis and Agnes Harwood, viz. : 

F 1. Margaret, married Thomas, eldest son of Chief Justice 
John Marshall. 

F 2. Eleanor Warner, married Robert Douthat, of Wyanoke. 

F 3. Frances Fielding, married Archibald Taylor, of Norfolk, Va. 

F 4. Nannie, never married. 

Issue of Thomas Marshall and Margaret Lewis, viz. : 

Gl, John; G2, Agnes; G 3, Mary; G 4, Fielding Lewis ; G5, An- 
nie Lewis; G 6, Margaret; G 7, Thomas. 

Issue of Robert Douthat and F 2, Eleanor Warner Lewis, viz. : 

G 1. Robert, married first, Mary Ambler, daughter of Chief Jus- 
tice John Marshall ; married second, Betty W. Wade. 

G 2. Jane, married William A. Selden. 

G 3. Agnes, married Robert Lewis McGuire, and had issue, viz. : 
HI, Jane; H 2, Minnie; H 3, Sally Melville ; and H4, Robert Lewis. 

G 4. Fielding Lewis, married Mary Willis, granddaughter of 
Chief Justice John Marshall. 

Issue of Archibald Taylor and Frances Fielding Lewis: 

G 1. Fielding Lewis, Colonel Confederate States Army; killed in 
battle; married Farley Fauntleroy. 

G 2. Archibald, married Martha Fauntleroy. Issue, viz. : H 1,, 
Archibald; H 2, Thomas. 

G 3. Robert E. , killed at the battle of Shiloh. 

Issue of Robert Douthat and Mary Ambler Marshall, viz. : 

H 1. Eliza; H 2, Eleanor Lewis; H 3, Mary M. ; H 4, Agnes, and 
H 5, Jacqueline Ambler. 

Issue of Robert Douthat and Betty W. Wade, viz. : 

H 1. Anderson; H2, Jane; H 3, Fielding L. ; H 4, Mildred; H 5^ 
Martha; H 6, Bettie; H 7, Helen P. ; and H 8, Warner Lewis, 
4 



50 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Issue of Wm. H. Selden and Jane Douthat, viz. : 

HI. Robert; H 2, Eleanor; H 3, Wm. Allen; H 4, Boiling; 
H 5, Agnes; H 6, Montgomery; H 7, Fielding. 

Issue of Fielding Lewis Douthat and Mary Willis Marshall, viz. : 

H 1. Elizabeth A.; H 2, Fielding; H 3, Rebecca; H 4, Peyton; 
H 5, Mary Willis ; H 6, Agnes ; H 7, Susan Harvie ; H 8, John M. ; 
H 9, Catherine. 

Issue of Colonel Fielding Lewis Taylor and Farley Fauntleroy, viz. : 

H 1. Fielding Lewis; H 2, Catherine; H 3, William; and H 4, a 
^daughter. 

Issue of James and Lewis, viz. : 

F 1 . Eleanor, married her cousin, John F. , son of Warner Lewis 
■and Mary Fleming; F 2, Sally, married Dr. Griffin. 

Issue of Addison Lewis and Susan Fleming, viz. : 

F 1. Susan, married William Byrd, of "Westover," James 
river, and had issue, viz. : 

Gr 1. Addison, married and left issue ; Gr 2, Mary Willing; G 3, 

Jane Otway, married McCandlish, of Williamsburgh; G 4, 

Samuel Powell, M. D., married his cousin, Mary Lewis Brooke. 

The -following is the account of the Lewis family furnished by 
Bishop Meade: 

" Among the families which belonged to Pohick church was that 
of Mr. Lawrence Lewis, the nephew of General Washington, the son 
of his sister Betty, who married Mr. Fielding Lewis. Mr. Lawrence 
Lewis married Miss Custis, the granddaughter of Mrs. Washington. 
In many of the pictures of the Washington family she may be seen, 
as a girl, in a group with the General, Mrs. Washington and her 
brother, Washington Parke Custis. There were two other full sisters, 
who married Mr. Law and Mr. Peters. Mrs. Custis, the widow of 
Washington Parke Custis, Mrs. Washington's son, married again. 
'Her second husband was Dr. David Stuart, first of Hope Parish and 
then of Ossian Hall, Fairfax county. He was the son and grandson 
of the two Mr. Stuarts who were ministers in King George for so long 
a period. They had a numerous offspring. The residence of Mr. 
Lawrence Lewis was a few miles only from Mount Vernon, and was 
called Woodlawn. After the desertion of Pohick they also attended 
in Alexandria, and some time after the establishment of St. Paul's 
congregation and the settlement of Dr. Wilmer in it, they united 
themselves to it, and were much esteemed by Dr. Wilmer, as he was 
by them. After some years they removed to an estate near Berry- 
ville, in what was then Frederick, now Clarke, county. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 51 

' ' Mr. Lewis was one of the most amiable of men by nature and 
became a sincere Christian and a communicant of our church. His 
person was tall and commanding, and his face full of benignity, as was 
his whole character. I wish some of our friends at a distance could 
have seen him in the position I once beheld him in the church at 
Berryville when I was administering the holy communion. Some of 
his servants were members of the church at that place, and on that 
day one of them came up after the white members had communed. 
It so happened that Mr. Lewis himself had not communed, but came 
up and knelt by the side of his servant, feeling, no doubt, that one 
God made them and one Saviour redeemed them. Mrs. Lewis was 
also a zealous member of the church, a lady of fine mind and educa- 
tion and very popular in her manners. Like her gi-andmother, she 
knew the use of her hands, and few ladies in the land did more with 
them for all church and charitable purposes, even to the last days of 
a long life. They had three children. Their son Lorenzo married 
a Miss Coxe, of Philadelphia, and settled on the estate in Clarke, 
but died some 3'ears since. The two daughters married— the one, Mr. 

Conrad, of New Orleans, and the other (Frances Parke), Mr. 

Butler, of Mississippi or Louisiana (Bayou Goula, La. , is her post- 
office). A numerous posterity is descending from them. ' ' 

Washington Lewis, son of Lorenzo, of Audley, near Berryville, 
Clarke county, Va. , has the portraits of Colonel Fielding Lewis and 
his wife, Bett}' Washington. One of Lorenzo Lewis' sons married 
a daughter of Reverdy Johnson, of Baltimore, Md. 

E 5. William, captain in the State line during the Revolution, 
the youngest son of Robert Lewis, of Albemarle county, Va., 
married Lucy, daughter of Thomas Meriwether, granddaughter of 
William Meriwether, and great-granddaughter of Nicholas Meri- 
wether, the Welshman. 

William Lewis lived about seven miles west of Charlottesville, 
Va. He raised three children, viz. : 

1. Captain Meriwether Lewis, the explorer of Oregon Territory. 

2. Reuben Lewis, who married his cousin, Mildred Dabney; and 

3. Jane Lewis, who married her cousin, Edmund Anderson. 
After the death of William Lewis, his widow married John Marks 

and had two children, namely: Dr. John Marks and Mrs. Mary 
Moore. She removed with her second husband to Georgia, and after 
his death returned to Albemarle county, Va., where she continued 
to reside to a very old age. 



52 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

The following extract we make from "Georgian," by George 11. 
Gilmer, page 104: 

Meriwether Lewis, Mrs. Marks' oldest son by her first husband, inher- 
ited the energy, courage, activity and good understanding of his admirable 
mother. He acquired in youth hard}- habits and a firm constitution. He 
possessed, in the highest degree, self-possession in danger, the great quality 
of great generals. 

From 1790 to 1795 the Cherokee Indians were very troublesome to the 
frontier people of Upper Georgia, stealing their negroes and horses ; occa- 
sionally killing defenseless women and children, and exciting alarm lest 
more extensive mischief might be perpetrated. 

During the restless, uneasy state of the people, created by the constant 
apprehension of attack, a report reached the Virginia settlement on Broad 
river that the Cherokees were on the war path for Georgia. Men, women 
and children collected together. It was agreed that the house where they 
were could not be defended, and might easily be burnt. They, therefore, 
sought safety in a deep, secluded forest. Whilst they were assembled 
around a fire at night, preparing something to eat, the report of a gun was 
heard. Indians! Indians! was heard from every tongue. Mothers clasped 
their infants in their arms, whilst the older children hung around them. 

The men seized their guns — all were in commotion and dismay. There 
belonged to the company a boy, wlio, alone, retained any self-possession. 
When every one was hesitating what to do, the light of the fire was sud- 
denly extinguished by his throwing a vessel of water upon it. When all 
was dark, the sense of safety came upon every one. That boj' Avas Meri- 
wether Lewis! When he arrived at maturity his love of action and enter- 
prising spirit led him into the regular army. He was the private secretary 
of President Jefferson when the Government determined to have the terri- 
tory of Louisiana explored, whicli had shortly before been purchased of 
France. His known intrepidity and habit of perseverance in the execution 
of his determinations pointed him out as the fittest person to head an ex- 
pedition for that purpose. By the permission of Mr. Jefferson he selected 
for his aid and companion his friend, Captain Clark, of the army. He 
passed from St. Louis, through diflHculties which few men would have 
undertaken and still fewer could have overcome, and acquired for his 
country, by the possession which he took of the Pacific coast, the title 
which was acknowledged to be the best to the Oregon Territory in the late 
controversy with Great Britain. 

In his expedition to the Pacific he discovered a gold mine. The fact 
was not made public, nor the place pointed out at the time, lest it might 
become known to the Indians and Spaniards and thereby be a public injury 
instead of a public benefit. 

He informed his friends, upon his return home, of the discovery which 
he had made and his intention of making out such a description of the 
place that it might be found if he should die before the information could 
be made useful to the country. As he was traveling from St. Louis, the 
seat of government of the Missouri Territory, of which he was then Gov- 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 53 

ornor, to Washington City, he stopped for the night at a little inn on the 
roadside somewhere in Tennessee. In the morning his throat was found 
cut and he dead; whether by his own hand or others in search of his ac- 
count of the place where gold was to be found, is not certainly known. 

Extract from Irving' s Life of Washington: 

The branch of the family to which our Washington immediately belongs 
sprang from Laurence Washington, Esq., of Gay's Inn, son of John Wash- 
ington, of Wharton, in Lancashire (England). This Laurence Washington 
was for some time mayor of Northampton, and on the dissolution of the 
Priories by Henrj- VIIL, he received in 1538, a grant of the manor of Sul- 
grave in Northamptonshire, which remained in the family until 1620, and 
was commonly called " Washington's Manor." Sir Laurence Washington, 
son of Laurence of Sulgrave, resided at the manor of Garsdon in Wilkshire. 
One of the direct descendants of Laurence, the grantee of Sulgrave, was Sir 
William Washington, of Packingham, in the county of Kent. He married 
a sister of George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham. Lieutenant-Colonel 
James Washington took up arms in the cause of King Charles and lost his 
life at the siege of Pontafract Castle. Another of the Sulgrave line. Sir 
Henry Washington, son and heir of Sir William, before mentioned, served 
under Prince Rupert at the storming of Bristol in 1643, and who also dis- 
tinguished himself still more in 1646, when elevated to the command of 
Worcester. 

The Sulgrave Washingtons were attached to the Stuart dynasty. In 
1655 an attempt at a general insurrection drew on them the vengeance of 
Cromwell. Many of them sought refuge in other lands. John and Andrew 
Washington (Frost and others say it was John and Laurence) were great 
grandsons of the grantee of Sulgrave, and uncles of Sir Henry, the 
defender of Worcester. John emigrated with his brother to Virginia in 
1657, and purchased land in Westmoreland county on the Northern neck, 
between the Potomac and Rappahannock rivers. John married a Miss Anne 
Pope of the same county and took up his residence on Bridge creek, near 
where it falls into the Potomac. He was a Colonel and commanded the 
Virginia forces against the Seneca Indians. He lies buried in a vault on 
Bridge creek. He had two sons, Laurence and John, and a daughter Anne. 
Laurence married Mildred Warner, daughter of Colonel Augustine Warner, 
by whom he had two sons, John and Augustine, and a daughter, Mildred. 
Augustine, the second son of Laurence, was twice married. By his first 
wife, Jane Butler, daughter of Caleb Butler, of Westmoreland county, 
whom he married in 1715, he had four children— Butler, Laurence, Augus- 
tine and Jane. Of these, Laurence and Augustine only attained to man- 
hood. Their mother died in 1728. His second wife was Mary Ball, whom 
he married in 1730. By her he had six children— George, Betty, Samuel, 
John, Aagustine and Mildred. Mildred died in infancy. Laurence, the 
elder half-brother of George, married in 1743, Anne, daughter of Honorable 
William Fairfax, of Belvoir, Fairfax county, and settled at Mt. Vernon, 
where he died in 1752. Augustine married Anne, daughter and co-heiress 



54' GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

of Wm. Aylett, Esq., of Westmorelond county, and settled at the home- 
stead on Bridge creek. George, the President, was born on Bridge creek, 
in the parish of Washington, Westmoreland county, Va., in 1732. In 1759 
he married in New Kent county, Mrs. Martha Custis, widow of John Parke 
Custis and daughter of John Dandridge. She had two children by her first 
husband, and none by the second, viz.: Washington Parke Custis and a 
daughter who died in early life. Nelly Custis, daughter of W. P. Custis, 
was the adopted daughter of Mrs. Washington.. Betty, the sister of 
George Washington, married Colonel Fielding Lewis, of Fredericksburg, 
Va. General George Washington died at Mt. Vernon, on the Potomac 
river, in 1799. 

"Colonel William Washington, who fought at the Cowpens and other 
places during the Revolutionary war, was the eldest son of Baily Wash- 
ington, Esq., of Stafford county, Va., and belonged to a younger branch of 
the original Washington family. He married a Miss Elliot, of Charleston, 
S. C, in 1752. 



^ [From the Louisville Journal.] 

THE WASHINGTON FAMILY. 
To the Editor of the Louisville Journal : 

Several articles having appeared in your paper in relation to the "Wash- 
ington Family," I desire to speak. I was well acquainted from my infancy 
with the late General Alexander E. Spotswood and Mrs. Spotswood, late of 
Barren county, Ky. General Spotswood was a grandson, I believe, of Gen- 
eral Spotswood, a colonial governor of Virginia, and, I believe, a nephew of 
the mother of " the Father of his Country." Mrs. Spotswood, the wife of 
General A. E. Spotswood, was a Miss Lewis, a niece of General Washington. 
General and Mrs. Spotswood left several children, Mrs. Adeline Anderson, 
of this city being one of them, and a grandniece of General Washington. 
Mrs. Dodge, wife of J. G. Dodge, is a child of hers. Mr. Dodge is a child 
of another daughter, who married the Rev. Mr. Dodge. 

I would further add that Mrs. Anderson has several other very worthy 
children, among whom is Judge Goodall, of Tennessee. Mrs. Anderson has 
been married twice, first to Mr. Goodall and next to Mr. Anderson. G. 



[From the Louisville Journal.] 
Some years since Lewis Washington, a descendant of the General (the 
General left no descendants), presented to the State of Virginia the lot of 
land in Westmoreland county on which stood the house in which the 
"Father of his Country " first saw the light of day. This was done with a 
view of having the spot marked by some suitable monument by the State. 
Last week the Governor and Secretary of State visited the spot in order to 
examine into the present condition of the "birthplace of Washington.'* 
It is proposed to have the ground, about an acre, enclosed and a roadway 
made in it. It lies on the Potomac river. A monument will be put up to 
designate the spot. A piece of the hearthstone of the ancient edifice 
(perhaps the only remaining relic) is now in the State Capitol at Richmond. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 55 

[From the Louisville Journal.] 

WASHINGTON'S FAMILY BIBLE. 

The agent of the Nashville Bible Society', Mr. R. M. Hawkins, has 
recently been distributing Bibles in Macon county, Tenn., and while trav- 
eling through the county met with the old family Bible that found a place 
in General Washington's chamber. Mr. Hawkins says: 

"I took it in my hands, examined it carefully, after which I read the 
nineteenth Psalm in family worship. I then asked the brother to tell me 
how he came in possession of it. He said that at the General's death his 
niece fell heir to it. Previous to leaving Virginia her son was taken sick 
and died. He waited on him until death. The old lady told him she was 
getting old and must soon die, and that she had nothing to give him for 
waiting on her son save the old family Bible. He gladly received it and 
brought it with him to Tennessee on horseback. He told me that he would 
not take three thousand dollars for it. The gentleman lives in the town of 
Lafayette, Macon county, and his name is Colonel Claiborne. You can't 
begin to imagine how I felt while turning over its leaves. I really felt and 
thought that I had found a precious jewel. It appeared to me that I 
would have given any price for it." 



General Washington's telescope is in the possession of Colonel 
Thornton, formerly of Green county, Ala. , and now of California. 

His powder horn with the glass in the butt end is, or was, in the 
possession of John Lewis, of Frankfort, Ky. , who died in 1858. 

His snuff box is in possession of one of the Washington family at 
Hansboro, Harrison county. Miss. 



56 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY, 



CHAPTEE III. 

JOHN LEWIS, OF HANOVER COUNTY, VA. 

A 1. John Lewis, Sr. , one of the original brothers that emigrated 
from Wales to America, was born about 1640. He resided awhile 
with the Mostyn family in Denbyshire previous to his emigration to 
America. It is not known whom he married. He died in Hanover 
county, Va. , in 1726, where his will can be found on record. 

The records of Hanover county, Va. , were burned during the 
Confederate war by the Federal army. 

This John Lewis, Sr. , was the great-great-grandfather of Wm. 
Terrell Lewis, of Louisville, or Perryville, Winston county. Miss., 
author of the Lewis genealogy. 

The Mostyn family is an ancient and wealthy family, owning 
extensive real estate in Denbyshire, Wales, which has descended to 
and been owned by several generations of that family. 

The following are the names of said family who have been pro- 
prietors of the Mostyn manor from 1649 to 1858 : 

1649, Sir Roger Mostyn, Sir Thomas Mostyn. 

1701, Sir Roger Mostyn, Sir Thomas Mostyn. 

1771, Sir Roger Mostj-n, Sir Thomas Mostyn. 

1800, Hon. Edward Mostyn, Lloyd Mostyn. 

1858, Hon. Thomas Mostyn, Lloyd Mostyn. 

In his will John Lewis, Sr., mentions the names of his six chil- 
dren, viz. : 

B 1. Mrs. Rebecca Lyndsay, born about 1677. 

B 2. Abraham, born about 1679. 

B 3. Sarah, born about 1681. 

B 4. Mrs. Angelica Fullelove, born about 1683. 

B 5. David, born about 1685, and 

B 6. John, Jr., born about 1687. 

John Lewis, Jr. , married Elizabeth McGrath, the sister of Mary, 
the third wife of David Lewis, to be mentioned hereafter. 

After the death of John Lewis, Jr., his widow married James 
Taylor, of Orange county, Va. , a relative of Zachary Taylor, Presi- 
dent of the United States. She died without issue. 

We have not attempted to trace up the posterity of any of the 
children of John Lewis, Sr. , the Welshman, except those of Da Aid, 
his fifth child, from whom this branch of the family is lineally 
descended. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 57 



CHAPTER lY. 

DAVID LEWIS, SR., OF ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VA. 

B 5. David Lewis, Sr. , fifth child of John Lewis, Sr. , was born 
in Hanover, Va. , about the j'ear 1685. About the year 1717, he 

married his first wife. Miss Terrell, daughter, it is said, of 

Joel Terrell, by whom he raised eight children; she dying in 1734, 
he married his second wife, by whom he had no issue, and her name 
is not known. 

William, James and John Terrell were brothers of Anglo-Norman 
descent. They came to America about 1660 as huntsmen for King 
James the Second, of England, and settled in Gloucester county, Va. 
For their dexterity in hunting they were awarded by the King 1,500 
acres of land each, to be selected by themselves in the counties of 
Hanover, Caroline and King George. 

According to the best historical and traditional evidence we can 
get, the family of Terrells in this country is of Anglo-Norman origin, 
and was founded in P]ngland by Sir Walter Tyrell, a Norman Knight, 
about A. D. 1066, when W^illiam the Conquerer took possession of 
that country. The ancient orthography of the name was Tyrell, 
Terrail, Tyrrell, Terrill, etc. 

General Wm. H. Harrison Terrell, of Indianapolis, la., and his 
brother. Lynch M. Terrell, of Atlanta, Ga. , have, for several years, 
been engaged in tracing up the Terrell family. General W. H. H. 
Terrell died recently, but his brother, L. M. Terrell, is still en- 
gaged in his inquiry after the names of the family and designs pub- 
lishing in pamphlet or book-form the result of his researches. 

About the year 1750 David Lewis moved from Hanover county 
and settled in Albemarle county, Va. Albemarle was then a new 
county, having been carved out of Goochland in 1744. In 1753, 
after he moved to Albemarle county, he married his third wife, the 
widow of Dr. Hart, of Philadelphia, Pa., whose maiden name was 
Mary McGrath, by whom he raised three children. After the death 
of his third wife he was engaged to be married the fourth time, but 
died very suddenly before the consummation of the nuptials. He, 
being advanced in life, was quite bald, consequently wore a wig, and 
on retiring; at night would hang his wig on the tester over his bed. 



58 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

He, being subject to nightmares, would often awake during the 
night after dreaming that the witches were riding him. On one 
occasion he awoke during a frightful dream that the witches were 
riding him. He sprang up in his bed, making, at the same time, a 
desperate effort to free himself from the clutches of the witch. Dur- 
ing his struggle to extricate himself from the night fiend he knocked 
down his wig which fell upon him. He seized it with avidity and 
tore it to pieces, exclaiming, at the same time: " Oh, I have caught 
you at last, have I? You have been riding me a long time." 

The next morning when he arose and looked on his ruined wig 
he remarked, dolefully: "There is fifteen shillings gone." 

He was once engaged in the mercantile business and had an in- 
terest in a cargo of goods then being imported from England. News 
came that the vessel was wrecked and the goods lost. Upon the 
reception of this information he started on horseback to Norfolk, Va., 
to ascertain the fact. At twelve o'clock, when near Norfolk, he 
called by the wayside at a house to get his dinner and horse fed, 
when, to his surprise, he found the landlord to be an old acquaint- 
ance. After dinner he called for his horse, but the landlord would 
not hear to his leaving and insisted on his tarrying with him until 
morning, to which he at length reluctantly agreed to do. At night 
when the hour for retiring arrived, he was waited on by a mulatto 
boy, who, with candle in hand, piloted him to a room above stairs. 
The boy pointed to a bed in the room upon which he could repose 
for the night and started down stairs with the candle, closing and 
locking the door after him. Our ancestor called out to the boy to 
bring back the candle and leave it in the room with him, to which 
the boy merely replied, that ' 'There is a mug under the bed, ' ' and 
did not return. He suspicioned that all was not right and made an 
examination under the bed to satisfy himself whether or not the boy 
had told the truth, when to his utter astonishment he found the 
body of a dead man concealed under the bed. His worst fears were 
now excited as to his own safety, as there was no way for him to 
make his escape from the room. He peeped through an aperture in 
the wall and descried in the distance men digging a grave by moon- 
light. 

Sleep fled from his eyes. Being unarmed he resolved to watch 
the movements of the family during the night, lest they might sur- 
prise him. He did not undress himself, but toused the bed and so 
arranged it as to make it appear as though he was asleep upon it. 
The door opened into his room. After the lapse of a few hours 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 59 

he heard the sound of footsteps stealthil}- ascending the stair-steps. 
He placed himself behind the door as it was opened, when the land- 
lord entered with an ax in his hand and approached the bed where 
his supposed victim unconsciously reposed, when, with a Herculean 
blow, he sunk the ax into the bed. At this propitious moment our 
ancestor made his escape from the room by flight down the stair- 
steps, at the foot of which he found another door closed with a 
latch; this he opened with a jerk so hurriedly that the door closed 
again and latched itself, which he had to open the second time, but 
eventually made his escape from the house and made his way to 
Norfolk, where his partner resided. He there reported what had 
happened, when a posse of men were summomed, who returned, 
took the landlord and several of his men prisoners. On the trial 
they confessed that the dead man under the bed was the seventh 
they had murdered, and that our ancestor would have added one 
more to that number, had he not made his escape. 

After David Lewis, Sr. , moA'ed and settled near where Charlottes- 
ville now stands, in Albemarle county, he was ofl'ered five hundred 
acres of the best quality of land in Virginia, lying some forty or 
fifty miles west of the then settlements, for a pair of buckskins, which 
he could have killed almost any day and dressed the next, but he 
thought at that time the back country- would not be settled in an 
age, and that the land would be of no value to him. 

In his old age he sometimes taught school gratuitously for the 
benefit of the poor. He never inflicted corporal punishment upon 
his pupils, but if any of them violated his rules during the week, 
he would, on Friday evening, tie a bundle of rods to their backs and 
send them home. 

He was a very large man with light hair and blue eyes, of strict 
integrity, benevolent character, and an exemplar^' member of the 
Presbyterian church. 

David Lewis, Sr., died in Albemarle county, Ya., in 1779, from 
flux, brought on by over-exertion and drinking too much cold water 
on a hot summer day, in August, after cutting down a tree in which 
there was a hawk's nest. 

His will was probated at the September term of the Albemarle 
County Court, in 1779. Stephen Willis, Anna Willis, Morning 
Clarkson, Robert Lewis, and Wm. Johnson were subscribing wit- 
nesses to said will ; and Joel Lewis, John Martin, James Lewis, 
and Taliaferro Lewis were his executors. He gave a certain amount 
of property to James Lewis, Elizabeth Martin, Miriam Lewis. Han- 



60 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

nah Hickman, Susannah Mackey, Sarah Musick, and Anna "Willis, 
to make them equal with his other children. The balance of his 
property he divided equally between his eleven children. 

On the records of Albemarle county may be found the following 
conveyance : 

In 1750, a deed of gift from David Lewis, Sr., to William Terrell Lewis, 
David Lewis, Jr., John Lewis, and Joel Lewis, of lands, all lying on the 
branches of Moore's creek. 

In 1759, a deed of land from David Lewis and Mary, his wife, William 
Terrell and Frances, his wife, and Joel Terrell, to John Dabney. 

About the year 1766, other members of the Lewis family, in 
Wales, attempted to emigrate to America. The vessel in which 
they sailed was captured by pirates near the Island of Jamaica, and 
all the passengers (except a few who made their escape during the 
capture) were landed on said island, where most of them perished. 
One of the Lewises who survived remained on the island and after- 
ward communicated this fact to his relatives in W^ales. Among 
those who made their escape from the vessel during its capture 
were one of the Lewises and a Welsh friend. Both being good 
swimmers, they swam to an adjacent island. Soon after landing 
upon this island they beheld a lion, from which they made their 
escape by climbing a cocoanut tree near by, where they were forced 
to shelter themselves and to subsist upon the fruit of the tree for 
two days and nights. There happened to be a nest of young birds 
in the tree, which they threw down to the lion, and to their great 
relief he disappeared. As a memento of that event they took from 
the tree a cocoanut and carved upon it a figure representing the 
vessel in which they crossed the ocean, a globe, and other designs, 
dated 1766. After the disappearance of the lion an English ship 
passed and took them back to their native land. The above-men- 
tioned nut was in possession of the descendants of the Lewis family 
in Wales as late as the year 1857, so the author of this work was 
informed (during his correspondence with the family in Wales) by 
Ellis Evans, of Holywell, Flintshire, Whales, a descendant of the 
Lewis famil}'. 

B 5. David Lewis, Sr., the fifth child of John, the Immigrant, 
was born about the year 1685, in Hanover county, Va. About 1750 
he moved to Albemarle county, where he died in 1779, as above 
mentioned. 

He raised eight children by Miss Terrell, his first wife, and 

three by Mary McGrath, his third wife, viz. : 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 61 

C 1. William Terrell, born 1718 ; married Sallie Martin, 

C 2. Susannah, born 1720 ; married xllexander Mackey. 

C 3. Hannah, born 1722 ; married James Hickman. 

C 4. Sarah, born 1724 ; married Abraham Musick. 

C 5. David, Jr., born 1726 ; married Rebeqea Stovall and 
Elizabeth Lockhart. 

C 6. John, born 1728 ; married Sarah Taliaferro and Susan 
Clarkson. 

C 7. Joel, born 1730 ; married Mary Tureman, Mrs. Gordon, 
and Lucy Daniels. 

C 8. Anna, born 1733 ; married Joel Terrell and Stephen Willis. 

C 9. Elizabeth, born 1754 ; married John Martin. 

C 10. Colonel James, born 1756 ; married Lucy Thomas and 
Mary Marks. 

C 11. Miriam, born 1759 ; married Colonel Gabriel Madison. 



62 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



CHAPTEE Y. 

WILLIAM TERRELL LEWIS, SR., OF NASHVILLE, TENN. 

C 1. William Terrell Lewis, Sr., the oldest child of David 
Lewis, Sr., was born in Hanover county, Va., in 1718. He moved 
from Hanover county to Albemarle, and was the third settler in said 
county. It was then a frontier county, having been formed in 1774 
out of part of Goochland county, which had been carved out of 
Henrico in 1827. Wm. T. Lewis, Sr. , was one among the first men 
who volunteered their services in Albemarle county, Va., to resist 
the high-handed measures of Lord Dunmore' s ' ' wicked administra- 
tion, ' ' as may be seen in the following sketch copied from a paper 
published at Charlottesville, Va. : 

ALBEMARLE IN 1775. 



INTERESTING EXTRACTS FROM AN OLD JOURNAL. 

Through the kindness of a friend we have before us a rare old 
document filled with matter of great local interest, from which we 
are permitted to make liberal extracts. It is a manuscript volume 
of several hundred pages, and appears to have been a sort of scrap- 
book kept by one intensely interested in the events transpiring just 
prior to the Revolutionary war. The writer was Dr. George Gilmer, 
the progenitor of the Albemarle family of that name. He was the 
grandfather of the late Governor Thomas Walker Gilmer, and the 
father of the first wife of William Wirt. He was first lieutenant of 
the first company of ' ' Independents ' ' raised in the county of 
Albemarle in view of the encroachment of the Crown on the liber- 
ties of the people of the Colonies, and to resist the high-handed 
measures of Lord Dunmore' s "wicked administration." Unfortu- 
nately, several pages are missing from the first portion of the 
volume, and the names of but a few of the enlisted men of this 
companj' can be given. We find, however, that the company was 
organized in April, 1775. 

OUR FIRST MILITARY COMPANY. 

In the terms of enlistment of this company the subscribers do 
most solemnly bind themselves "by the sacred ties of virtue honor 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



63 



and love to our countrj- to be at all times ready to execute commands 
in defence of the rights of America, agreeable to the underwritten 
resolves :' ' 

TERMS OF EXLISTMEXT. 

"1st. We resolve, should we fail or fly back when called into service, 
to be held as unworthy the rights of freemen and as inimical to the cause 
of America. 

"2d. That each man elected to the office of Captain, Lieutenant, or 
Ensign, and refusing to accept the same, oblige himself to pay £25 for the 
first, £15 for the second, and £10 for the latter, to be disposed of by the 
committee for the use of the Company. 

" 3d. We oblige ourselves to obey the commands of the officers by our- 
selves elected for the enlisted volunteers, to muster four times in the year, 
or oftener if necessary, to provide gun, shot-pouch and powder-horn, and 
to appear on duty in a hunting-shirt." 



FRAGMENTARY ROLL. 

The following is the fragment of the roll of the officers and men 
of this company as enlisted under the above agreement : 

OFFICERS. 

Charles Lewis, Captain ; George Gilmer, John Marks, Lieutenants ; 
John Harvie, Ensign ; William Sims, William Wood, William Terril 
Lewis, John Martin, Sergeants; Fred William Wills, Thomas Martin, Jr., 
Patrick Napier, David Allen, Corporals ; John Lowry, Drummer. 

Of the one hundred and forty-two enlisted men, the names of 
only thirty-four are preserved in the manuscript, as follows : 



Edward Garland, 
John Henderson, 
Isaac Wood, 
Falvy Frazier, 
Charles L. Lewis, 
Samuel Carr, 
James Quarles, 
Isaac Davis, 
Spencer Norril, 
Reuben Lindsay. 
Robert Martin, Jr., 
Patrick Fisher, 



PRIVATES. 

Samuel Gay, 
Mann Battle, 
John Watkins, 
Mica Defoe, 
John Wood, 
David Dalton, 
Shad Battle, 
James Logan, 
James Lislie, 
William Flint, 
Roger Shackelford, 
John Dickerson, 



Ed. Hughes, 
Stephen Hughes, 
James Dudley, 
James Stephenson, 
William Johnson, 
John Coles, 
James Lewis, 
Edward Carter, 
Turner Richardson, 
George Thompson. 



A note at the bottom of the roll states that those with a certain 
mark had powder, and those marked with the chemical character for 
gold, marched from Charlottesville, or joined us on the way to 
Williamsburg, "in order to demand satisfaction of Dunmore for 



64 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

the powder and his threatening to fix his standard and call over the 
negroes." 

Upon the organization of this company, Lieutenant Gilmer 
delivered a highly patriotic address, of which we give the conclud- 
ing paragraph : 

" Gentlemen: You behold me before you with my tomahawk girt about 
me, and though I am but too sensible of my awkwardness, yet j-our esteem 
shall animate me to its proper use ; and give me liberty now, soldiers, to 
plight my honor to you, that my ability shall not only be exerted to make 
mj'self master of the necessary parade of war, but of the really useful 
branches of that intricate science ; and I do dedicate my arms, life, and 
fortune to the protection of my countrj' and the service of the First Com- 
pany of Independents for the county of Albemarle, with this firm resolve — 
never to burj' the tomahawk until liberty be fixed on an immovable basis 
through the whole continent. 

CORRESPONDENCE WITH COLONEL, AFTERWARD 
GENERAL, WASHINGTON. 

The First Company of Albemarle Independents having been 
fully organized, its officers addressed the following letter to Colonel 
Washington on the 29th of April, 1775 : 

29th April, 1775. 
To Colonel Washingion : 

Sir : The county of Albemarle in general, and the gentlemen volunteers 
in particular, are truly alarmed and highly incensed with the unjustifiable 
proceedings of Lord Dunmore, who, we are informed, has clandestinely 
taken possession of our ammunition lodged in the magazine. We should 
have attended at Fredericksburg in order to have proceeded to Williams- 
burg to demand a return of the powder had the alarm reached us before 
an account of securities being given for its delivery. However, to assure 
you and the world of our readiness and willingness to resent every encroach- 
ment of arbitrary power, we here declare to you, should it be necessaiy, 
that the First Company of Independents for the county of Albemarle will 
attend in Williamsburg, properl^^ equipped (and if not to be obtained 
otherwise), to enforce an immediate delivery of the powder or die in the 
attempt. With respect we remain, ready to obey your commands, 

Charles Lewis, Captahi. 
George Gilmer, ) 
John Marks, \ Lieidenants. 

To this patriotic tender of service, Colonel Washington made the 
following response : 

Mount Vernon, May 3, 1775. 

Qenilemen : I was not at Fredericksburg when j'our favor of the 29th 
ultimo reached that place, nor did anj'body think to send your letter to 
me, otherwise an immediate answer would have been dispatched. I ob- 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 65 

tained sufficient intelligence from Williamsburg before the meeting at 
Fredericksburg to convince me that there could be but little occasion for 
men to go thither from distant counties, and that I could not, under that 
plea, justify my non-attendance on a duty I had been deputed to by the 
country at large. These were my reasons for not being at Fredericksburg. 
I highly applaud the spirit you have manifested on this occasion. I thank 
you for the honor you intended me in being under my command, and am, 
with sincere esteem, gentlemen. 

Your Most Obedient Servant, 

CJo. Washington. 

To Captain Charles Lewis and Lieutenaiits Gilmer and Marks, of the First Com- 
pany of Volunteers in Albemarle. 

In our next issue we shall give further information in regard to 
this and other early military organizations in Albemarle, together 
with other extracts from this ancient and interesting manuscript. 

In 1763, Wm. T. Lewis made a deed of gift to his daughter, 
Mrs. Anna McConnell, the wife of John McConnell, both of whom 
died in Fayetteville, Tenn. , which is on record in Albemarle county, 
Va. Before the Revolutionary war, he emigrated from Albemarle 
county, Va. , to Surry county, N. C, and settled in view of the 
celebrated ' ' Pilot Mountain. ' ' Wheeler, in his History of North 
Carolina, says : 

In 1775, Surry county was a frontier county. The Mulberry Field 
Meeting-House, in the upper end, was the only place of meeting. The 
men generally dressed in hunting shirts, short breeches, leggings and 
moccasins ; and the women in linsey petticoats and bed gowns, and in 
summer often without shoes. Some had bonnets made of calico, and 
others wore men's hats. The patriotism of the women of this region 
deserves a perpetual record. It was their heroic conduct that inspired 
their husbands and sons in the cause of liberty. They urged the men to 
leave home and to prefer to die than be slaves, while they remained at 
home and worked with their own hands at the plow and with the hoe by 
day to provide sustenance for their families, and at night with the spin- 
ning-wheel and loom they made the clothing." 

Soon after the commencement of the Revolutionary war, William 
T. Lewis, Sr. , applied to Grovernor Caswell, of North Carolina, for 
military commissions for all his sons then old enough to bear arms, 
and declared that, "if the British came into Surry county, where 
he resided, he would arm his negroes and fight them himself. ' ' 

In 1781, 1783, 1785, 1786, and 1788, he represented Surry 
county as a member of the Greneral Assembly. (See Wheeler" s 
History of North Carolina, page 40.) 



66 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

In 1793 he emigrated to Nashville, Tenn., where he died about 
the 3-ear 1802. 

About the year 1739 he married Sarah Martin, who died in 
Surry county, N. C. 

They had eleven children, viz. : 

D 1. Elizabeth, born 1740; married John Fielder. 

D 2. Susannah, born 1742; married Thomas Benge, Sr. 

D 3. Anna, born 1744; married John McConnell. 

D 4, David, born 1746; was killed in North Carolina in 1769. 

D 5. Mar}', born 1747; died in childhood. 

D 6. First Wm. Terrell, born 1749, and died in 1756. 

D 7. First James Martin, born 1753, and died in childhood. 

D 8. Captain Micajah, born 1755; was killed at Guilford C. H., 
N. C, in 1781. 

D 9. Second Major \Vm. Terrell, born 1757; married Mary 
Hipkins. 

D 10. Colonel Joel, born 1760; married Miriam Eastham. 

D 11. Second James Martin, born 1762; married Mary B. 
Herudon. 

D. 1 Elizabeth Lewis, born 1740 ; married John Fielder; had 
three children, and died in Williamson county, Tenn. 

Their children were as follows: 

E 1. Jack Fielder, married a Miss McCutcheon, and left 

posterity on Duck river, Tenn. 

E 2. Nimrod Fielder, married Elizabeth Riggs, in Surry county, 
N. C. ; had five children, and died in Huntsville, Ala., in 1854. 
Elizabeth was a daughter of Adam Biggs, who died near Shelbyville, 
Tenn. Their children were, viz. : 

F 1. Miriam Fielder, married Thos. Bibb, of Huntsville, Ala. ; 
had five children, and died in Huntsville, Ala., in 1833. 

Issue of Miriam Fielder and Thos. Bibb, five children, viz. : 

Gr 1. Nimrod, died single in Huntsville, Ala., in 1869. 

G 2. Benjamin F., was a soldier in Greneral Price's army, and 
afterward was a Lieutenant in McGuirk's Cavalry Regiment; was in 
fourteen difl'erent skirmishes and battles. 

G 3. Mary, born 1824; married Dr. W. D. Lyles, of Macon, Miss. 
Dr. Lj'les was a man of decided ability and originality. He was 
elected as Senator in 1865 from Noxubee and Winston counties, 
Miss., to the State Legislature. He was favorably spoken of as a 
suitable candidate for gubernatorial honors, and had he lived no 
doubt would have been elected Governor of the State. He was a son 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 67 

of Silas Lj'les and his wife, Priscilla Tharp, of Fairfield county, S. C, 

iind a grandson of Wm. Lyles and his wife, Miss Ward, of the 

same county. The doctor graduated in medicine at the University of 
Maryland in 1837. He was surgeon-general of the State of Missis- 
sippi, and was a surgeon in the Confederate Army, and medical 
director of the Western Army under General Polk. 

Issue of Mary and her husband. Dr. W. J). Lyles, viz. : 

H 1. 3Iartha Louisa, familiarly known as Pattie Lyles, married 
N. D. Collins, a lawyer of Memphis, Tenn., in 1866. She is now 
(1891) in the Post-offlce Department at Washington City, D. C. We 
clip the following from the Aberdeen Examiner: 

' ' Mrs. Pattie Lyle Collins, daughter of the late Dr. Lyle, of 
Macon, Miss., and one of the most brilliant Southern women in 
Washington, was promoted on the 27th of July (1885) from a fourteen 
hundred dollar clerkship in the Dead Letter Office of the Post-offlce 
Department to a sixteen hundred dollar position in the office of 
Foreign Mails. In addition to her official duties, Mrs. Collins has 
found time to win an enviable position in literature, and her con- 
tributings are eagerly sought by leading periodicals. ' ' 

The following item may be found in Golden ^foments, an illustrated 
magazine published at Augusta, Me., in September, 1888: 

" x\n accomplished lady is Mrs. Pattie Lyle Collins, who is 
engaged in the Dead Letter Department at Washington to make out 
difficult superscriptions. All written languages, except Russian and 
Chinese, are read by her. ' ' 

H 2. Mary Longstreet Lyle, married, in 1863, Dr. John F. 
Kennedy, of Lauderdale county, Miss. The doctor committed 
suicide by drinking laudanum. He left one son: Gr 1, Charles 
Clark, born 1865. 

H 3. Elizabeth Fielder Lyle, married, in 1869, Major Berry. 

H 4. Victor Roby ; H 5, Thomas Bibb; and H 6, Fanny M. Lyle. 

G 4. Lemira A. , daughter of Miriam and Thos. Bibb, married 
John F. Hobbs, of Black Hawk, Carroll county. Miss. They have 
children, viz.: H 1, Thomas, born in 1847; married Miss Samuella 
Hunter near Emery, in Holmes county, Miss. 

Gc 5. Caladonia M. , married her cousin, James Pollard, a nephew 
of Thos. Bibb, of Hunts^ille, Ala., where they reside and have 
children, viz. : HI, Susan; H 2, Martha; H3, Frank; and H4, Jennie. 

F 2. Sarah, daughter of Nimrod Fielder and Elizabeth Riggs, 
married Richard S. Coffee, son of Thomas and grandson of Joshua 
Coffee, of Prince Edward county, Va. Joshua Coffee had three 



68 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY, 

children, viz. : General Jolin, Thomas and Mrs. Mary Harris. The 
families of General John and Thomas are in Lauderdale county, Ala., 
and the family of Mrs. Mary Harris is in Rutherford county, Tenn. 
Richard S. Coffee is a nephew of General John Coffee. 

F 2. Mrs. Sarah Coffee, had twelve children, marked G, viz. : 

G 1. Clay borne Mayes, stammers in his speech, was born in 
Madison county, Ala., in 1820; married Cornelia Green, and has 
three children, viz. : 1, Miriam; 2, Minervus; and 3, John E. He is 
a Cumberland Presbyterian minister; was chaplain of the 27th 
Alabama Infantry, C. S. A. ; resides near Hillsboro, " Morgan 
county, Ala. 

G 2. Mary E., born 1821; married Azel Myrick; both dead; left 
no issue. 

G 3, John C, born 1823; been married three times; has four 
children, viz. : H 1 , Mary Jennings ; H 2, Francis E. ; H 3, Eustacia : 
and H 4, Rebecca G. Post-office, Centre Star, Ala. 

G 4. Miriam B., born 1826; married John Scott, a nephew of 
General Winfield Scott. They have four children, viz.: 1, William; 
2, Sarah E. ; 3, Richard T. ; and 4, John S. C. Their post-office is 
Athens, Limestone county, Ala. 

G 5. Richard N., born 1828; married Ada Crenshaw; has two 
children, viz.: 1, Richard; and 2, William C. Richard N. is a 
merchant at Centre Star, Ala. 

G 6. Joel F., born 1830; was killed near Atlanta, Ga., in 1864. 
He belonged to Company E, 7th Alabama Cavalry, C. S. A. 

G 7. Prudence M. , born 1833; married Joshua Crittenden, and 
has four children, viz. : 1, Thomas R. ; 2, Puss Coffee; 3, Sarah E. ; 
and 4, Luietella. Post-office, Centre Star, Ala. 

G 8. Misaniah C, born 1835; married Rev. Marcus G. Williams, 
a Methodist preacher and member of Tennessee Conference of M. E. 
Church, South. She has one child: H 1, Sarah Elizabeth. 

G 9. Nimrod T., born 1837; married Catherine Davidson. Their 
post-office is Leighton, Ala. He is a farmer, with two children, viz. : 
H 1, Thomas J. ; and H 2, Mary Fielder. 

G 10. Joshua D., born 1839; is a farmer. 

G 11. Elizabeth F., born 1841. 

G 12. Sarahs., born 1845. 

All of Mrs. Sarah Coffee's sons and sons-in-law were in the 
Confederate army, and were in the principal battles of the Army of 
Tennessee, Nimrod T. was commissary of the 27th Alabama 
Infantry. He was paroled at Vicksburg, Miss. , and afterward taken 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 69 

prisoner, while at home, and carried to Camp Morton in April, 1864, 
and there remained until the close of the war. 

Joshua D. was ordnance sergeant of the 7th Alabama Cavalry. 

M. G. Williams was chaplain of the 3d Tennessee Infantry until 
the fall of Donelson, then assigned to duty in 47th Tennessee 
Kegiment, after which he commanded as Captain of Company E, 
7th Alabama Cavalry. 

F 3. Joel R., son of Ximrod Fielder, died single in 1834. 

F 4. Elizabeth C. , daughter of Nimrod Fielder, married Thomas 
Bibb as his second wife, he having married Miriam, her elder sister. 
They reside in Huntsville, Ala. , and have six children, viz. : 

G 1. Myra. 

G 2 Thomas H. , in the employment of the Mobile & Ohio Rail- 
road Company. 

G 3. James 0. , was severel}' wounded in the face at Baton Rouge, 
La. , during the Confederate war ; his P. 0. is Black Hawk, Miss. 

G 4. Amanda; G 5, Jackson, was drowned; G G, Lucy, of Hunts- 
ville, Ala. 

E 3. Elizabeth, daughter of John Fielder, of Williamson county, 
Tenn., was born in 1780; married David Cummins, and died in 
Davidson county, Tenn., in 1834. He died in Fayette county, Tenn., 
in 1836. David Cummins had black hair and white eyebrows. 
Issue of Elizabeth Fielder and David Cummins, nine children, viz. : 

F 1. John Overton, born 1801 ; married Martha McCauly in 1824, 
at Smithland, Ky. He was a merchant in Tuscaloosa, and Mobile, 
Ala., where he died in 1853. His children are, viz. : 

G 1. Elizabeth, born 1825; married Jas. Wofford; had eight chil- 
dren and died in De Soto Parish, La., 1848. 

G 2. Miriam, born in 1827. 

G 3. John Overton, Jr., born 1829; married Julia Manning, of 
Demopolis, Ala. ; P. 0. , Montgomery, Ala. 

G 4. David, born 1830; married Caroline Moor; P. 0., Mobile, 
Alabama. 

G 5. St. John, born 1836; married, in 1856, Caroline Tabor, Mo- 
bile, Ala. 

G6. Martha, born 1839; G 7, Samuella R., born 1841; G 8, 
Robert, born 1843; and G 9, William, born 1845. 

F 2. Henry G., son of David Cummins, born 1803; married 
Charlotte Hyde, Mary Weems and Anna Pugh; has children and 
resides near Duck River post-office, Hickman county, Tenn. 

F 3. Samuel, son of David Cummins, born 1806; married Dorothy 



70 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Holt in 1827. Post-offlce, Reform, Ala. They have eight chil- 
dren, viz. : 

Gr 1. John H., born 1829; married and has children. 

G 2. Martha E., born 1831; married Benj. Jennings. 

G 3. David, born 1833; married and had two children, Curtis 
and David, and died 1868. 

G 4. Isabella L., born 1837; married James Lowdermilk; has 
five children, viz. : H 1, Morgant; H 2, Jas. C. ; H 3, John 0. ; H 4, 
Samuella; and H 5, Frances. 

G 5. Vinson, born 1839; married John W. Johnson, and has 
four children, viz.: H 1, Elizabeth M. ; H 2, Frank; H 3, James; 
H 4, Samuel. 

G 6. Samuel H., born 1842; died 1867. 

G 7. Robert Lewis, born 1844; died 1864. 

G 8. James Wofford, born 1847; married Frances Johnson; she 
had one daughter, Isabella S., and died in 1869. 

F 4. Waller, son of David Cummins, born 1809; married; had 
four children, and died, 1847, in MuiTaj county, Tenn. 

F 5. Mary, daughter of David Cummins, born 1811; married 
John Edmundson, and resides ten miles east of Nashville, Tenn. 

F 6. Elizabeth Cummins, born 1814; married Robert Herbert; 
has children, and resides ten miles east of Nashville, Tenn. 

F 7. Miriam L. Cummins, born 1816; died single, in Pickens 
county, Ala., in 1841. 

F 8. David Cummins, Jr., born 1819; died single, in Murray 
county, Tenn., in 1853. 

F 9. Robert L. Cummins, born 1821; married Sarah Lang; 
resides at Northport, Ala. , and has nine children, viz. : 

G 1. David Hullum, born 1853, died 1854; G 2, John Overton, 
born 1854; G 3, Rebecca E., born 1856; G 4, David H, born 1858; 
G 5, Miriam L., born 1860; G 6, Robert L., born 1862; G 7, Frank- 
lin E., born 1864; G 8, Thos. A., born 1866; and G 9, Sarah A., 
born 1869. 

D 2. Susannah, daughter of Wm. T. Lewis, Sr. , and his wife, 
Sallie Martin, was born in Hanover county, Va. , in 1742. She 
moved, with her father, to North Carolina and settled in Wilkes 
county, where she died at the foot of Brushy Mountain at a very 
advanced age. 

She married in Albemarle county, Va., about 1760, Mr. Thomas 
Benge, Sr. , who emigrated with her to Wilkes county, where he also 
died. 



E 


2. 


E 


3. 


E 


4. 


E 


5. 


E 


6. 


E 


7. 


E 


8. 


E 


9. 


ElO. 


El. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 71 

They raised ten children, viz. : 

E 1. David, born about 1761; married, name unknown. 

James, born about 1763; married Miss Cheeks. 

William, born about 1765; married Elizabeth Banks, 
Thomas Jr., born about 1767; married Tempey Brown. 
Rev. Richard, born about 1769; married Jane Hinshaw. 
Nancy, born about 1771 ; married Anderson Bryant. 
Mar}', born about 1773; married Zach Ray. 
Anna, born about 1775; married Mordecai Samuels. 
Sarah, born about 1777; married Geo. Gra}'; and 
Susannah, born about 1779; married John Martin. 
David, son of Thos. Benge, was a soldier of the Revolu- 
tionary war, and was killed by the Tories in North Carolina. He 
left a widow and, perhaps, children. 

E 2. James, who married Miss — — Cheeks, died in North Caro- 
lina without issue. 

E 3. Wm. Benge, son of Thomas; born 1765, was a hatter by 
trade, and lived on his father's old place in AVilkes county, N. C, 
until 1819, when he emigrated to Sequatchie Valley, in Marion 
county, Tenn., where he and his wife both died. His wife's name 
was Elizabeth Banks, b}' whom he raised four children, viz. : 
F 1 Micajah Lewis, married a Miss Mary Creekmore. 
F2. George; F 3, Joel; and F 4, Sarah. 

E 4, Thos. Benge, Jr., was a fine-looking man — was five feet 
nine inches in height, weighing 240 pounds, with round face, blue 
eyes and light hair. He was a carpenter b}' trade, and married 
Tempey Brown — moved to Indiana, where they both died, leaving 
three children, viz.: F 1. Tempey; F 2, Obediah; and F 3, Alfred. 
E 5. Rev. Richard, son of Thos. Benge, Sr. , was born about 
1769. He was a farmer and member of the Baptist church. 

He married Jane Hinshaw in North Carolina, in 1832 — moved to 
Franklin county, Tenn. , and from there he emigrated to Mississippi, 
and died in Panola county in 1860. His wife died in the same county. 
They raised twelve children, marked F, viz. : 

F 1. Rebecca, married Ab. Embry and Wm. Vestal, and resides 
near Waxahachie, Ellis county, Tex. They left several children, 
viz.: G 1. W. A. Embry; G 2, A. A. Vestal, of Tate county. Miss., 
etc. 

F 2. Mary Adeline, daughter of Rev. Richard Benge, married 
in 1840, John Gates, of Pleasant Grove, Panola county. Miss. They 
had eleven children, viz.: G 1. Thomas B., born 1842, married Eliza 



72 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Paisket; G 2, Susan Frances, born 1845, married Benjamin M. Box- 
ley, of Pleasant Grove, Miss. ; Gr 3, Nancy Jane, born 1845, married 
Button Butler and Wm. D. Boxley. 

Gr 4. Jas. Polk, born 1847; married in 1871, Mrs. Hutson, nee 
Miss Carter. 

G 5. Wm. Richard, born 1849; died 1855. 

G 6. Jas. Martin, born 1851 ; died 1878, in Panola county. Miss. 

G 7. Martha Ann, born 1852; G 8, Benj. Parker, born 1854, 

married Miss Hunter; G 9, Andrew Valentine, born 1856; 

G 10, Adeline E., born 1859; and G 11, Katie Emeline, born 
1863. 

F 3. Thomas, son of Rev. Richard Beuge, married Anna Ster- 
rett; died in San Augustine, Tex., 1845; left two children, viz. : G 1, 
Wm. Lester, born 1837; married M. M. Hill, of Hunt county, Tex., 
and has five children, viz.: H 1. Ella, born 1872; H 2, Charles Mar- 
tin, born 1874; H 3, Nettie, born 1876; H 4, Thomas, born 1877; 
and H 5, Sallie, born 1880. 

G 2. Richard Provine, son of Thomas Benge and Anna Sterrett, 
born 1839; married Harriet R. Cox, Fannin county, Tex. 

F 4. Wm. B., son of Rev. Richard Benge, married Sallie Luster, 
of Texas. 

F 5. Alfred Benge, son of Rev. Richard, married Polly Haj's; 
was killed by a fall from a horse in McKinney county, Tex. He left 
issue. 

F 6. Rev. Martin Lewis Benge, son of Rev. Richard, married 
Jane Strong and Emeline Roseborough, resides near Olive Branch, 
De Soto county. Miss. ; has four children by each wife, viz. : G 1 . 
Mary, died; G 2, Fannie, died; G 3, Sam. D. , married Demetrice L. 
Marshall and has children in Gibson county, Tex., viz.: H 1. Fan- 
nie; H 2, Lela; H 3, Martin Lewis. 

G 4. Beatrice, daughter of Rev. Martin L. Benge, died; G. 5, 
Rev. Richard Wallace, born 1852, married Hattie E. Tigus, in 
Texas; G 6, Sydney Allen, l)orn 1854, died 1859; G 7, Hattie Jane, 
born 1857, died; G 8, Matilda, born 1859. 

F 7. Baxter, son of Rev. Richard Benge, married and died in 
Dardanelle, Ark., in 1880; F 8, Presley Benge, married; F 9, Rich- 
ard Benge, Jr., married Jane Hall; resides near Beebe, White 
county. Ark. ; has children, viz. : G 1. Thomas, married Bettie De- 
ment; G 2, Ellen, married Jas. Dement; and G 3, John. 

Issue of Ellen and James Dement, viz. : 

H 1. Bettie, married Dr. K. A. Mcintosh, of Beebe, White 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 73 

county, Ark. ; H 2, Emma, married Wm. Bradley; H 3, Ella; H 4, 
Jennie; and H 5, J as. Thomas. 

F 10. Capt. James M. , sou of Rev. Richard JSeuge and his wife, 
Jane Hinshaw, married Drucilla Levaeh. He died a soldier in Rich- 
mond, Va., during the Confederate war. He commanded a com- 
pany as captain during said war. 

F 11. Joel, son of Rev. Richard Benge, married Martha Sorrels 
and resides at Longtown, Panola county. Miss. 

F 12. Susan Benge, daughter of Rev. Richard, married John 
Sorrels. 

E 6. Nancy, daughter of Thos. Benge, Sr. , and his wife, Susan- 
nah Lewis, was born in 1771 ; married Anderson Bryant — had two 
children, viz.: F 1. Payton; F 2, Eliza. 

E 7. Mary, daughter of Thos. Benge, Sr., born 1773; married 
Zach. Ra}', and left children in Christian county, Ky., viz.: F 1. 
Mitchell, etc. 

E 8. Anna, daughter of Thos. Benge, Sr., was born about 1775; 
married Mordecai Samuels and left children, viz.: F 1. Micajah; 

F 2, Lewis, married a Miss Chappell, etc. Mr. Samuels was 

drowned in South Carolina. 

E 9. Sarah, daughter of Thos. Benge, Sr., born about 1777; 
married George Gray, a farmer. The}' emigrated from Virginia and 
settled in Wilkes county, N. C. , fourteen miles below Wilkesboro, oa 
the Yadkin river, where they both died, leaving eleven children, 
marked F, viz. : 

F 1. Elizabeth, married Martin McBride; lived in Stokes county, 
N. C, and had three children, viz. : G 1. George; G 2, Terrell; and 
G 3, Sarah. 

F 2. Susan Gray, daughter of George, married Charles Walker. 

F 3. Thomas Gray, married Elizabeth Curr3^ 

F 4. Joel Gray, married Elizabeth Lewis. 

F 5. Willis Gray, married ^liss Morrison, of North Carolina, 

F 6. Harrison Gray, married Letha Ellis and died in Missouri. 

F 7. Terrell Gray, married Mary Martin, his cousin, daughter of 
Susannah and John Martin, of Franklin county, Tenn. Terrell Gray 
resides at or near Estill" s Fork, Jackson county, Ala. They raised 
seven children, marked G, viz. : 

G 1. Obadiah, is a farmer, married and lives in Benton county, 
Ark. 

G 2. George L. , was killed near Sparta, Tenn. , during the Con- 
federate war. He served under Starnes. 



74 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY, 

Gr 3. Edmond L., is farming .near Hempstead, Waller count}',. 
Texas. 

Gr 4. Richard H., married a Miss Quinn; resides near Waco, 

McLennon county, Tex. , and has two children, viz. : 

H 1. Jessie Lee, married W. F. Smith, and has one child, viz. : 

I 1. Richard C. Smith. 

H 2. Quinn Gray. 

Gr 5. Susan, married Nathan Sims, a farmer, and resides in Paint 
Rock Valley, near the line between Franklin county, Tenn. , and 
Jackson county, Ala., and has children. 

Gr 6. Sarah Ann, married Eldridge Sisk, a farmer of Paint Rock 
Valley, Ala., and has children. 

G 7. Martha Elizabeth, married Woods Collins, a merchant in 
Paint Rock Valley, and has children. 

F 8. Martha, daughter of Geo. Gray; married John Spencer 
and was living in Surry count}', N. C, near Jonesville, and has 
children. 

F 9. Obadiah, son of Geo. Gray. 

F 10. Lemira, married John Sales and did reside near Brier 
Creek, Wilkes county, N. C. They are members of the Baptist 
church and have children. 

F 11. Sarah, daughter of Geo. Gray; married Thomas McBride — 
both members of the Baptist church — reside in Wilkes county, X. C, 
and have children. 

E 10. Susannah, daughter of Thomas Benge, Sr. , was born 
about 1779, and married John Martin, a farmer. They resided six 
miles below Winchester, in Franklin county, Tenn. , where they both 
died leaving eleven children, viz. : 

F 1. Nancy; F 2, Elizabeth; F 3, Martha; F 4, Mary; F 5, Susan; 
F 6, Dicey; F 7, Thomas; F 8, William; F 9, Rev. Hickman; F 10, 
Lewis; F 11, James. 

F 1. Nancy Martin, daughter of John; married Geo. Hutchin- 
son and settled in Carroll county, Miss. They left two children, 
viz. : G 1, John; and G 2, Elizabeth. 

F 2. Elizabeth, daughter of John Martin, married Ben San- 
didge, and had ten children, viz.: G 1. Martha; G 2, Haston; G 3, 
Diana; G 4, Sarah; G 5, Nicholas Lewis; G 6, Mary; G 7, Lucy; 
G 8, Susan; G 9, Nancy; and G 10, Robert. 

F 3. Martha, daughter of John Martin; married Orange Garner. 
They had five children, and died in Canton, Miss. 

F 4. Mary Martin, married her cousin, Terrell Gray, and resides 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 75 

near Estill's Fork, Jackson count}', Ala. For the names of her 
children see Terrell Gray. 

F 5. Susan Martin, married Aaron Thompson; they died near 
Winchester, Tenn., and left eight children, viz.: Gr 1. Wm. Lewis; 
G 2, Jas. H. ; G 3, Geo. W. ; G 4, Joseph; G 5, Mary; G 6, Susan; 
G 7, Thomas; and G 8, Ann. 

F 6. Dicey Martin, married Geo. Staples, Carroll county, Miss. 

F 7. Thomas Martin, married Mary Garner; a house carpenter; 
died in Madison county. Miss. His widow married Andrew Haslip, 
of Carroll county. Miss. F 8, Wm. Martin, married Elizabeth San- 
didge; he died in Mississippi and she died in Franklin count}', 
Tenn. , leaving one son, Isaac Newton Martin, a merchant at Salem, 
Franklin county, Tenn. 

F 8. Lewis M«artin, Sr. , married Eleanor Garner, had one son, 
G 1. Lewis Martin, Jr. After the death of Lewis Martin, Sr. , his 
widow settled in Carroll county, Miss., and married Willis Burton. 

F 9. Rev. Hickman Martin, son of John and Susan Benge, was 
a Baptist preacher. He married Dorcas Staples, and settled in 
Mississippi, where his first wife died. He was three times married, 
and died in Memphis, Tenn., during the Confederate war, leaving 
children. 

F 10. James Martin, is a farmer. He married in Mississippi 
and emigrated to Louisiana. 

D 3. Anna, daughter of Wm. T. Lewis, Sr., of Nashville, Tenn., 
was born in Hanover county, Va., in 1744. Her father moved from 
Hanover to Albemarle county, Va. , about the year 1750. About 
the year 1770 she married John McConnell. Albemarle was then 
a frontier county. Wild game, such as deer, turkeys, bears, etc., 
was very plentiful in that section of the country' at that time. 

In her old age she would frequently relate incidents that occurred 
in her early life, and among them were the following: 

She said that "when she first came to Albemarle county wild 
turkeys were so plentiful* that they would eat up the food that she 
gave her chickens and tame turkeys, unless she would run them off 
with a brush or something else. ' ' 

When she would get through telling this incident she would gen- 
erally conclude it by saying: " What a fool 1 was I did not take up 
a stick and kill them ! ' ' She and her husband finally moved to 
Tennessee and settled in or near Fayetteville, Lincoln count}', where 
they lived to be very old people. She was a very stout and healthy 
woman, scarcely ever having a day's sickness in her life. A few 



76 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

years before she died she was unable to walk, but retained her mind 
and memory to the last. She had been unable to get out of her bed 
for months before she died ; but the day before she died she got up 
and sat on her bed and sang an Indian song in the Indian language 
and then sang it in English, and remarked that she had not sung 
that song in fifty years before. 

She died in 1837. She had eight children, viz. : 

E 1. William, born about 1772; died single. 

E 2. Robert, born about 1774; died single. 

E 3. James, born about 1776; died single. 

E 4. Major John Perry, born about 1778; married M. C. Kennedy. 

E 5. Nancy, born about 1780; married David Allen. 

E 6. Mary, born about 1782; died single. 

E 7. Susannah, born about 1784; died single. 

E 8. Sarah, born about 1786; never married. 

E 4. Major John P. McConnell, was born in 1778; he married 
Martha Campbell Kennedy; lived and died at Fayetteville, Tenn. 
They had ten children, viz. : 

F 1. Micajah Lewis, born 1807; died single, in Louisiana, in 1835. 

F- 2. Greneral Felix Grundy, was born 1809. He was a lawyer 
by profession, and was a member of the Senatorial branch of the 
State Legislature from Talladega county, Ala. ; then a member of 
Congress from that district up to the time of his death, which 
occurred in Washington Cit}^ in 1846. He was a man of respectable 
talents. He was a very free-hearted man, and would divide his last 
dollar with a friend, or fight for him if occasion required it. He once 
transfixed with a sword-cane a man by the name of Metcalf at 
Talladega Court House, Ala. 

He and his neighbors once had a lot of money in the Bank of 
Cahaba, Ala., which had become very much depreciated. He 
volunteered his services to go to Cahaba and have the paper 
redeemed in specie. He took his own and his neighbors' money 
and presented it to the cashier at the bank in Cahaba. The cashier 
informed him that the bank had suspended and consequently he 
could not redeem the paper. Felix Gr. expostulated with him, 
reasoned with him and used all the arguments that his genius could 
command, but all to no purpose; the cashier was as obstinate, appar- 
ently, as the rock of Gibraltar. The General saw at a glance that it 
was a desperate case and to accomplish his object he would have to 
resort to desperate means. He drew his six-shooter, confronted the 
cashier and demanded the specie or his life. The cashier stood as 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 77 

motionless as a statue for a few moments, as though he were ponder- 
ing in his own mind whether he would give up his life or his mone}. 
He saw vengeance in the Greneral' s eye, and that it would not do to 
trifle with him. He counted out the specie, which the General 
deposited in his saddle bags, mounted his horse and rode off, 
whistling ' ' Yankee Doodle. ' ' 

F 2. Felix G. McConnell married, in 1835, Elizabeth Hogan, 
near Talladega Court House, whose father resided on the Talladega 
battle-ground, and in whose garden were deposited the remains of the 
gallant dead who fell in that memorable battle. General Felix G. 
McConnell committed suicide in Washington City, D. C, and left 
a widow with four children, viz. : 

G 1. William Kennedy, born 1836. 

G 2. Felix G., Jr , born about 1838. 

G 3. Catherine, born about 1840. 

G 4. Ann E., born about 1842. 

F 3. Kobert Kennedy McConnell, sou of John P., was born in 
1810, and died single, in Lincoln count}-, Tenii. , in 1855. 

F 4. Anna Lewis McConnell, daughter of John P., was born in 
1812. In 1831 she married N. B. Garner, by whom she had four 
children. 

Mr. Garner was killed in Texas, it is said, by Governor J. Pink 
Henderson. After the death of Mr. Garner she married Charles 
Stewart, and now resides in the cit}- of New York. 

F 5. Esther McConnell, daughter of John P., was born in 1815, 
and died in 1816. 

F 6. John P. McConnell, Jr., was born in 1817, and died single, 
in Talladega county, Ala., in 1836. 

F 7. Martha Campbell McConnell, was born in 1819. She 
married K. M. Weaver, and resides near Fayette ville, Lincoln 
county, Tenn. , and has eight children, viz. : 

G 1. John P. ; G 2, Francis F. ; G 3, Lucius K. ; G 4, Hugh T. ; 
G 5, Charlotta M. A. ; G 6, Susannah; G 7, Mary H. ; G 8, Sarah A. 

F 8. Mary McConnell, daughter of John P., born 1821, and 
died 1827. 

F 9. Sarah Thomas McConnell, daughter of John P. , was born 
in 1824. In 1846 she married H. C. Holman; resides in Austin, 
Tex., and has children as follows: G 1, Robert; G 2, Raney; G 3, 
Martha ; G 4, Ann ; G 5, Moriah, etc. 

F 10. Mary E., daughter of John P. McConnell, was born in 
1824. In 1851 she married Robert Hill, and resides, a widow, at 



78 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY, 

Fayette ville, Tenn., Mr. Hill having died in 1861, leaving children 
as follows: Gr 1, Robert F. ; G 2, John P., etc. 

E 5. Nancy, daughter of John McConnell and his wife, Anna 
Lewis, was born in 1780. She married David Allen, and lived near 
Tuscumbia, Ala. , and raised five or six children, viz. : 

F 1. John H. ; F 2, Alfred; F 3, Lorenzo D. ; F 4, Lewis; and 
F 5, Sarah, who married a Mr. Lightfoot and left issue, viz. : 

Gr 1. Robert Lightfoot, who has a daughter, viz. : H 1, Henrietta, 
who married a Mr. Porter, of Courtland, Ala. 

Gr 2. Mrs. Asa Messenger, daughter of Sarah Lightfoot, left 
issue, viz. : H 1, North Messenger, editor of the North Alabamian, 
a paper published at Tuscumbia, Ala., etc. 

E 6. Mary, and E 7, Susannah, daughters of John McConnell, 
were born respectively in 1782 and 1784 — both died in childhood. 

E 8. Sarah, daughter of John McConnell, was born in 1786; 
was killed by the explosion of a steamboat on the Tennessee river 
in 1824, while on a pleasure trip. She never married — was a very 
amiable woman, much beloved by all who knew her. 

D 4. David, son of Wm. T. Lewis, Sr., of Nashville, Tenn., was 
born, perhaps, in Hanover county, Va., in 1746. He emigrated with 
his father to Albemarle county, Va., and from there to Surry county, 
N. *C., where he was killed in 1769. The man who killed him fled 
the country — was pursued, captured, brought back, tried for the 
murder and hung. 

D 5. Mary; D 6, Wm. Terrell; and D 7, Jas. Martin, children of 
Wm. T. Lewis, Sr. , of Nashville, Tenn., were born respectively in 
1747, 1749 and 1753, all of whom died in childhood. 

D 8. Major Micajah Lewis, son of Wm. T., Sr. , was born in Al- 
bemarle county, Va. , in 1755. 

We copy from ' ' King' s Mountain and its Heroes, ' ' by Draper, 
from pages 457 and 458, viz. : 

' ' Micajah Lewis, who descended from Welsh ancestors, was born 
in Albemarle county, Va. , in 1755, and early removed to what sub- 
sequently became Surry county, N. C. He was appointed a lieuten- 
ant in 1776, and was a captain in service in 1778. He joined Gren- 
eral Lincoln in 1779, and shared in the battle of Stono; and in June, 
1780, he went in pursuit of Bryan's Tories, and was a Major and 
Quartermaster in Cleveland's regiment on the King's Mountain 
Campaign, receiving a wound in the battle. He served as a volun- 
teer at Pile's defeat February 25, 1781, and two days afterward, 
while out reconnoitering, he was mortally wounded, dying the next 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 79 

<l;iy, and was buried at Dickey's plantation on the Alamanee. " He 
had rendered service in the North Carolina line, and was, as General 
Joseph Graham states, "a real soldier," of "past service and ex- 
perience. ' ' His name can be found in Wheeler' s History of North 
Carolina, on page 80 of the first part. 

After the retreat at Gilford Court House, he was sent back by his 
■commander. General Pickens, to reconnoiter the enemy. He was 
halted by the enemy at the crossing of a creek near Gilford Court 
House and asked "who was there?" He replied, "a friend," when 
the enemy fired on him. Captain Herndon Harralson, who was in 
company with him, said that Major Micajah Lewis, after receiving 
the shot, rode past him apparently almost insensible, and expired 
the next day. 

In the list of warrants that have been issued for officers and sol- 
diers of the Revolutionary Army that remain on the files of the 
Bounty Land Office unclaimed, may be found the name of Captain 
Micajah Lewis, in the American State papers as published by Duff 
Green in Vol. V., page 32. On another page in " King's Mountain," 
Major Micajah Lewis is mentioned as presiding over a court mar- 
tial, where several Tories were condemned to be hung. 

The following we copy from ' * King' s Mountain and its Heroes, ' ' 
page 247: 

" Abovit the time the Virginians advanced to the conflict, Major 
Micajah Lewis, with his brother, Capt. Joel Lewis, both of the Wilkes 
and Surry troops, with CaiJtain Andrew Colvill, of the Virginia regiment, 
had been designated by Colonel Campbell to make a dash on horseback 
upon the British main guard half way up the spur of the mountain; and 
having swept them out of the way, to fall back, dismount and join the 
others in the general advance." 

Page 261: 

'■' Of his fellow officers of Cleveland's regiment who were also among 
the wounded, were Major Micajah Lewis, Captain Joel Lewis, Captain 
Minor Smith and Lieutenant James M. Lewis. The three wounded 
Lewises were brothers, and a noble triumvirate they were." 

Page 304: 

"Of the Wilkes and Surry men under Cleveland and Winston, we have 
only the names of two men killed — Thos. Bickiiell and Daniel Sisk, of 
Wilkes county; Major Lewis, Captain (Joel) Lewis and others, wounded." 

Page 388: 

"Read (the Tory) was tried, Colonel Cleveland and Martin Armstrong, 
and Major Lewis sitting upon the court martial, was found guilty of crimes 
«,nd misdemeanors, and condemned to be hung." 



80 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Page 457: 

"It is not a little singular, that the three brothers — Micajah, Joel and 
James M. Lewis, were all officers, and were all wounded at King"s Moun- 
tain." 

Page 588: 

"Col. Samuel Newell said he visited Major Lewis, his brothers, and 
Capt. Smith, all of Cleveland's regiment, and all wounded, when billeted 
in Burke county. When in a conversation on the battle. Major Lewis said: 
' Boys, I believe you all did 3'our duty, and deserve well for it, but let me 
tell you, had it not been for Campbell and his Virginians, Til be d — d if 
Ferguson would not have been on that mountain yet, had he chosen to stay 
there.' " 

Lyman C. Draper, in his "King's Mountain and its Heroes," 
said there were twenty-two of the Lewis connection in the battle of 
King's Mountain. So far as I have been able to ascertain, their 
names were: John McConnell, Thos. Benge, Micajah Lewis, Joel 
Lewis, of Surry county, N. C, James M. Lewis, John Macke}-, Abra- 
ham Musick, Lewis Musick, Col. David Musick, Joel Musick, 
Jehoiada Musick, Wm. Musick, David Lewis, of Spartanburg, Ed 
Ballenger, Peter Hawkins, Thomas Rowland, Joel Terrell, of Ruth- 
erford, Capt. Robert Adams, Robert Hackett, Richmond Terrell, 
Wm. Twetty and Joel Lewis, of Spartanburg, S. C. 

D 9. (2d) Maj. William T. Lewis, Jr., son of Wm. T., of 
Nashville, Tenn., was born in Albemarle county, Va., in 1757. He 
emigrated with his father from Albemarle to Surry county, N. C, 
and settled in Wilkes county. He was a soldier of the Revolution, 
and continued in the service of his country until the surrender of 
Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown, in 1781, when he returned home, like 
thousands of others did, with his clothes almost worn out. 

In 1785 Wm. T. Lewis, Jr., represented Wilkes county, N. C, in 
the State Legislature. See Wheeler's History of North Carolina, page 
465. About the year 1793, he emigrated with his father and 
brothers to Nashville, Tenn., where he traded in lands and kept a 
hotel for many years. He was very kind and hospitable to strangers, 
and his house was the stopping-place for all distinguished lawyers 
and dignitaries on visiting Nashville. 

An interesting picture of him and his wife represent them as 
very handsome and dignified looking old people. The place now 
(1866) is owned by and is the home of Maj. Wm. B. Lewis, who 
married Margaret, his youngest daughter. 

D 9. Major Wm. T. Lewis married, about the close of the Revo- 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 81 

lutionary war, Miss Marj- Hipkins, who was said to be a dowerless 
beauty and half-sister to Miriam Eastham, the wife of Colonel Joel 
Lewis. These two sisters were said to be related to Lord Fairfax, 
of Yirgiuia. 

Major Wm. T. Lewis raised seven children, one son and six 
daughters, and died in Nashville, Tenn., about the year 1808. 

His daughters were highly accomplished, very beautiful and 
intelligent. Notwithstanding, they were, it is said, votaresses of 
city fashions, which doubtless shortened their days, for only one of 
them ever lived to be twenty-eight years of age, while the most of 
them died under twentj^-four. They all died in the vicinity of 
Nashville, and all are (except Eliza, the wife of Governor Wm. C. 
C. Claiborne) buried at the old homestead, Fairfield, situated in the 
vicinity of Nashville. But one of them, out of the six daughters, left 
living descendants. 

The following are the names of his seven children and their pos- 
terity in part, to-wit: 

E 1. Sarah T., born 1780; married Dr. Thos. A. Claiborne. 

E 2. Eliza, born 1782; married Governor Wm. C. C. Claiborne. 

E 3. Micajah Green, born 1784; killed in a duel in Louisiana. 

E 4. Mary, born 1786; married Alfred Balch. 

E 5. Myva, born 1788; married Major John H. Eaton. 

E 6. Charlotte, born 1792; married Major Isaac L. Baker. 

E 7. Margaret, born 1793; married Major "Wm. B. Lewis. 

E 1. Sarah T., was born about 1780 in (perhaps) Wilkes county, 
N. C, and came with her father to Nashville, Tenn., in 1793. She 
married Dr. Thomas A. Claiborne, had four children and died of 
consumption at twenty-four years of age. Dr. Claiborne was a 
brother of Governor Wm. C. C, and was for many years a surgeon 
in the United States Navy. The following are the names of her 
three children: 

F 1. Munroe Jackson Hays, born in 1802, and died in child- 
hood. 

F 2. Wm. Ferdinand Leigh, born in 1804; never married; was 
a free, generous-hearted man, and died near Nashville, Tenn., at 
twenty-eight years of age. 

F 3. Mary E. T., born about 1806. She was a beautiful and 
sprightly girl and married, at the age of nineteen, Hon. Abraham 
Poindexter Mamy, of Williamson county, Tenn., in 1826. She had 
nine children and died of consumption in 1852, in Williamson 
county, Tenn. 



82 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Hon, Abraham P. Maury was born in Williamson county, Tenn. , 
in 1801, and died in the same county in 1848. 

He was a son of Abraham Maury, who emigrated from Virginia 
about the year 1788 or 1789, and was among the first settlers of 
Williamson county. He laid out and named its chief town, Franklin, 
where he died in 1825, universally beloved and honored by all who 
knew him. He was of Huguenot descent, being the grandson of the 
Rev. James Fontaine, who, with his affianced wife, Mademoiselle 
A. E. Boursequot, and others, fled from France after the revocation 
of the Edict of Nantes, in 1685, by Louis XIV., which unwise act, 
as is well known, occasioned the loss to France of thousands of her 
most honest, industrious and useful citizens. Rev. James Fontaine 
sought refuge in Great Britain, married there, and, after more than 
one change of residence, settled finally in Dublin, Ireland, where he 
educated a family of five sons and two daughters. In this city the 
eldest of these daughters, Mary Ann Fontaine, met and married 
Matthew Maury, likewise a Huguenot refugee. They emigrated to 
Virginia in 1719, whither two of the lady's brothers had already 
removed— another following shortly afterward. Of these three 
brothers, James, Peter and Francis Fontaine, the two last were 
worthy clergymen of the Church of England. 

Matthew Maury and his wife, Mary Ann, had three children: 
1st, James, who also became a clergyman (and, like his uncle, a 
worthy one) of the Establishment, and was the grandfather of 
Lieutenant Matthew Fontaine Maury, of the National Observatory 
at Washington, and a gentleman of distinguished scientific reputa- 
tion; 2d, Mary, who married a Mr. Daniel Claiborne, of Virginia; 
3d, Abram, Sr. (the grandfather of Hon. A. P. Maury), who married 
a Miss Susannah Poindexter. Abram Maury, Jr., who died in 
Maury county, Tenn. , married Miss Martha Worsham, of Virginia. 
They had nine children, all of whom, save two, were reared. Their 
fourth child, Hon. A. P. Maury, was born, as above mentioned, in 
the year 1801, in Maury county, Tenn. In his early life he was 
a very peculiar child, addicted early to books, and habits of abstrac- 
tion, and taking little or no pleasure in the sports which to most 
children are so irresistibly attractive. So strange did he seem to 
his mother — musing on the fence-top or other out-of-the-way place, 
or else perched, book in hand, in a favorite tree in the rear of the 
house — that on one occasion she expressed her apprehensions to her 
husband that " her son did not have good sense." Whereupon, her 
husband replied: "Never fear. Patsy, my dear, Abraham is our 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY, 83 

smartest child." At the age of fourteen he was chosen to deliver 
a Fourth of July oration in Franklin. At seventeen he went to St. 
Louis, Mo. , and edited a newspaper for a year or two. At eighteen 
or nineteen he went as a cadet to West Point, staid a year, returned 
home, studied and practiced law for awhile, went to Nashville and 
edited a political paper, entitled The Republican, for some time, during 
which he married Mary E. T. Claiborne, as above mentioned, and 
a 3"ear after his marriage bought the farm, etc. , of his then recently 
deceased father and thenceforward had his home in Williamson 
county. As to his politics, he was a member of the Whig party; 
served with credit at various times in both branches of the State 
Legislature of Tennessee, his last experience of political life being 
as Senator therein. For two terms he was a member of Congress, 
and, at his death, was spoken of b}' the National Intelligencer as a 
** former able Representative from Tennessee." 

He was what can be said of but few of the race of politicians, 
' ' a pure and honest one, and was a man of strict integrity in all the 
relations of life." He was but an indifferent farmer, always fond 
of books. He was sj^stematic as well as devoted in his reading, and 
was, besides, a chaste and beautiful writer. Literature should have 
been his pursuit. Had he made it such and lived in a different 
section of our country he would have achieved an enduring fame as 
a writer and lecturer. He delivered addresses on various occasions 
in Tennessee, all of which were well received, and two of them with 
marked applause : One, before the Franklin Library Association, on 
the ' ' Peculiar Advantage of the United States in Comparison with 
Other Nations," was so highly appreciated by the citizens of his 
town that the day after its delivery a subscription was raised for its 
publication. Another, on the ' ' Choice of a Profession, ' ' delivered 
at the request of the Literary Societies of Lebanon University, 
created quite a sensation among his auditors, one of the students 
asserting at this day that ' ' wherever he goes that address goes with 
him." 

Both prose and poetry were occasionally contributed by him to 
the Southern Literary Messenger, of Richmond, Va., and in calling 
attention to one of these articles the editor referred to him as "one 
of- the ablest writers of the Southwest." He was a man of hand- 
some and dignified appearance, of a grave and intellectual counte- 
nance. He was a kind husband and an affectionate father — honored 
and loved by those who knew him best, and generally held in high 
respect wherever known. His children should feel that one of the 



84 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

brightest heritages which could have been left them is theirs — the^ 
descent from one who was emphatically "the noblest work of God — 
an honest man. ' ' 

[From the Scientific American of February 22, 1873.] 

MATTHEW F. MAURY. 

"Matthew Fontaine Maury, formerly an officer in the United States 
Navy, afterward of the Confederate States Navy, died recently at his resi- 
dence at Lexington, Va., aged sixty-seven. He was formerly Superintendent 
of the Government Hydrograpliic Office, where he elaborated investigations 
in regard to winds and ocean currents. The discovery of the telegraphic 
ocean plateau and the indication of good whaling ground is attributed to 
him. At the time of his death he was Professor of Physics in the Virginia 
Military Institute." 

THE FAMILY OF PATRICK HENRY. 

The statement, in a paragraph copied from the New York Free- 
mavbS Journal, that General Joseph E. Johnson is a grandson of 
Patrick Henry, is not quite correct. The following extract from a 
private letter, written sometime last year by Rev. Edward Fontaine, 
of Mississippi, gives the true relationship and supplies some other 
interesting genealogical links: 

"I am the son of Colonel Patrick H. Fontaine, of Henry count j% Ya. 
My grandfather, Colonel John Fontaine, married Martha, the oldest child 
of Patrick Henry; consequently, I am the great-grandson of the orator. 
Patrick Henrj' had only one brother, William, who died without children; 
but he had many sisters, all of whom left descendants. 

" 1st, Elizabeth, whose first husband was General Campbell, the hero of 
King's Mountain, and ancestor of the Prestons, of South Carolina and 
Abingdon, Va. Her second husband was General Russell, a border hero. 
Campbell and Russell counties, of Virginia, are named after her husbands. 
She was a great woman, fully equal in talents to her brother. 2d, Anna, 
the wife of General Christian, of the Revolution. Christian county, of 
Kentucky, was named after him. She left no descendants of the name of 
Christian; but she is the ancestor of the Bullitts and W^arfields, of Kentucky. 

"3d, Mrs. Wood — I have forgotten her Christian name. She had no 
son by her husband, Valentine Wood. I think he was once Governor of 
Virginia, and Wood couniy is named after him. One of her daughters 

married Mr. Southall, of Albemarle county, Va., and the other, Judge 

Charles Johnson, of Abingdon, Va., the father of our distinguished General 
Joseph E. Johnson. He is a nephew of Patrick Henry, or rather his grand- 
nephew. His mother and my grandmother were first cousins. 

"4th, Mrs. Meredith, of Amhurst county, Va. 

"5th, Mrs. Madison, of Botetourt county, Va., is the ancestor of the 
Bowyers and many of the Lewises. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 85 

" 6th, Mrs. Thomas married an English merchant and settled in England. 

"The mother of my grandfather, Colonel John Fontaine, was Elizabeth 
Winston, a cousin of Patrick Heury. The mother of Patrick Henry was 
Sarah Winston. Her first husband was Colonel John Symmes; her second, 
John Henry. 

"General Patrick Henry, of Mississippi, and Hon. Gustavus Henry, of 
Tennessee, are not descendants of the great orator, but their ancestor was 
his uncle, the Rev. Patrick Henry, a Scotch Episcopal clergyman, who 
settled in Virginia and educated his illustrious nephew, who was named 
after him. 

"The first of my own name, whose history is well known in France, was 
the Seigneur Jean de la Fontaine, maitre d'ordonnance of Francis I. He 
was a nobleman, an accomplished scholar and soldier, one of the first con- 
verts of the Reformation, a leader and protector of the Huguenots. He was 
born in the year 1500, and was massacred on the night of St. Bartholomew. 
All my Fontaine and Maury relations are descended from him. 

"The Fontaines, Claibornes, Maurys, Gentrys, Lewises, Madisons, 
Taliaferros, Poindexters, Terrells, etc., intermarried in Virginia." 

[From " Virginia Baptist Ministers," first series, page 371.] 
REV. JOHN POINDEXTER. 

The ancestry of John Poindexter were highly respectable. His grand- 
father was a French Protestant, whose adherence to religious principles 
compelled him to leave his native land and seek shelter from papal op- 
pression in the Island of Great Britain. At this time he was the head of a 
large family. Shoi-tly after his arrival in England, one of his sons, 
Thomas Poindexter, became attached to a j'oung lady, whom he addressed, 
and who reciprocated his affection. 

As there was considerable disparity in their circumstances, the father 
of Thomas was much displeased, and expressly forbade the connection. 
More effectually to prevent it, he gave his son a handsome estate and sent 
him to Virginia. This being made known to the j'oung ladj', she determined 
to follow in search of her intended husband, and for this purpose indented 
herself as a servant for four years. She succeeded in reaching the shores 
of Virginia. The young Frenchman having heard that a vessel with ser- 
vants had arrived, and desiring to obtain one, made application, when, on 
examining, he discovered his once intended spouse. 

The meeting was joyful. They rushed to each other's embraces. He 
paid the stipulated price, and she became his wife. From these sprang all 
the Poindexters known in America. He and his wife were baptized in 
1790, by Elder Henry Goodloe. He was ordained to the ministry in 1792. 
He was instrumental in forming a church in Albemarle county, called 
Bethel, and was the Clerk of Louisa county for many years, and filled that 
oflfice up to the time of his death, which took place the latter part of the 
year 1819. 

F 3. Mary E. T., daughter of Dr. Thomas Augustine Claiborne, 



86 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

married, as above mentioned, Hon. Abraham Poindexter Maury, 
and had the following named children: 

G 1. Martha Thomas Maury, born 1827; married, in 1848, Nich- 
olas Edwin Perkins, a farmer of Williamson county, Tenn. They 
have children, viz.: H 1, Edwin Maury, born 1850; H 2, Leila Oc- 
tavia, born 1851; H 3, Maud Claiborne, born 1854, etc. N. E. 
Perkins resides near Franklin, Williamson county, Tenn. 

G 2. Sarah Claiborne Maury, daughter of Abraham P. , was born 
in 1829, in Williamson county, Tenn. She married, in 1849, her 
cousin, Dr. William Steptoe Reed, as his third wife. Dr. W. S. 
Reed practiced medicine several years in Holly Springs, Miss. , then 
moved to, and settled near McMinnville, Warren county, Tenn., 
where they now reside. Mrs. Sarah C. Reed, like her father, was 
endowed with an intellect far above mediocrity, and as an epistolary 
correspondent, her chirography and terseness of style are of a su- 
perior order. 

She has children, viz. : H 1. Mary Maury, born 1850; H 2, Sophia 
Josephine, born in 1852, and died 1853; H 3, Julia, born 1853, and 
died in 1854. 

G 3. Mary Ferdinand Maury, daughter of Abraham P., born 
1830, and died in 1844. 

G 4. Elizabeth J. Maury, born 1832, and died 1853. 

G 5. Josephine, born 1834, and died 1849. 

G 6. Abram Poindexter Maury, Jr., born 1836; married, in 1856, 
Mar}' H. Perkins — resides in Williamson county, Tenn., and has 
children, viz. : H 1, Wm. 0. Neille, etc. 

Gr 7. Septimia Maury, born 1840. 

G 8. Octavia, born 1842, and died 1851; and 

G 9. Ferdinand Claiborne Maury, born 1845. 

We here present one verse, as a specimen, from the pen of Hon. 
A. P. Maury, which was composed in his early life, the persual of 
which will convince any critic that he was no ordinary man, and 
that had he devoted his time and talents to literature, he would have 
ranked among the ablest poets of the age: 

REFLECTION ON LIFE. 

BY A. P. MAURY. 

What is our present being's aim and end? 

Why are our hearts with restless passion rent? 
Why doomed through life one weary way to wend 

Without one moment of unmix'd content, 

Our being burdensome, our time misspent? 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 87 

Why doomed to die? to go — we scarce know where, 

Our bodies with their common blent, 
Our soaring souls, on ether borne afar 
To seek a resting-place — perhaps In some bright star ! 

F 4. Micajah Greeu Lewis, son of Dr. Thomas Augustine Clai- 
borne, was born in 1808, at Windsor, the home of Dr. T. A. Clai- 
borne, two miles from Nashville, Tenn. His mother dying in 1809, 
left him a child of eleven months old, in charge of his grandparents. 

In 1820 died his last aunt, Charlotte Baker, who, in her dying 
moments, bequeathed him to her husband, Maj. Isaac L. Baker, of 
Louisiana, who sent him to Connecticut in the year 1821, where he 
remained four years at school. He returned to Tennessee in 1825, 
and entered what was then called Cumberland College, remaining 
two years. In 1827 he entered the United States Navy as acting 
midshipman; went to the coast of Brazil in 1828, in the frigate 
Hudson, Commodore John Orde Creighton; returned to the United 
States in the following year in the frigate Brandywine, Com. Jacob 
Jones. In 1831 he was ordered to New York, to join the frigate 
Potomac, Com. John Downes; sailed for the Pacific, via Cape of 
Good Hope, under order to touch at Quallabattoo, on the coast of 
Sumatra, and chastise the natives who had murdered the crew of the 
ship "Friendship of Salem." They did chastise them most effect- 
ually, from which the place has never recovered to this day. The 
Potomac returned home in the spring of 1839, M. Gr. L. Claiborne 
being her second master. In the following year he was examined, 
and received his warrant as Past Midshipman. Congress having 
authorized the exploring expedition, he applied for the mastership 
of one of the small vessels, and through the kindness of his old 
Commander, John Downes, who wrote a very flattering letter to 
Commodore T. Ap. Catesby Jones, secured the berth. The expedi- 
tion as organized under Jones lamentably failed, and toward the 
close of 1837, or beginning of 1838, Jones retired and M. Gr. L. C, 
with him, he having been promoted to a lieutenancj'^ in 1838. 
Lieut. Charles Wilkes being then the Commander of the expedition, 
he applied to accompany him, and was made First Lieutenant of the 
brig Porpoise, and sailed from Norfolk in the summer of 1838. 
The expedition being at anchor in Orange Harbor, westward of Cape 
Horn, and several of the Lieutenants, of whom M. Gr. L. C. was 
one, feeling themselves injured in respect to their rank, applied to 
return to the United States. M. Gr. L. Claiborne was detached by 
Wilkes from the Porpoise and ordered to the Relief, the storeship. 



88 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

and was told that as soon as his services could be dispensed with, 
his request would be granted. The Relief having the scientific corps 
of the expedition on board, was ordered on a very dangerous piece 
of service, for which she was ill-adapted by reason of her build. 
While in the performance of this duty they were driven by a furious 
gale to anchor under Nair Island, west of Cape Horn, and off the 
coast of Terre del Fuego; they barely escaped shipwreck, having 
lost all their cables and anchors. For a full description of this 
perilous scene the reader is referred to Wilkes' narrative of the ex- 
pedition. 

Tlie Relief could not return to Oi'ange Harbor, as ordered, so 
proceeded to Valparaiso, on the coast of Chili, where, procuring 
cable, anchor and provisions, sailed for Callao, on the coast of Peru. 
In due time they were joined by the expedition, and the Relief was 
ordered home by wa}" of the Sandwich Islands, Sidney, in New South 
Wales, and Cape Horn; arrived in New York in the spring of 1840. 
In November of that year M. G. L. Claiborne was ordered to the 
Constellation, the flag-ship of the East India squadron, Com. Law- 
rence Kearney, then at Boston. They sailed from there in Decem- 
ber for Rio Janeiro, thence to Cape Town, in South Africa, where, 
finding the rigging and rudder of their ship in a very unseaworthy 
condition for doubling the Cape, and no means of repairing it, Lieut. 
Claiborne volunteered his services to go to Cape Town by land — 
about ninety miles — and procure what was necessary for the rudder, 
a diagram being furnished by the ship's carpenter, drawn on a 
plank about a foot and a half in diameter. This he strapped to his 
back, hired a horse of an old Dutch boar at a guinea a day, and 
wended his way through a desolate and thinly settled country to 
Cape Town, thus expediting the sailing of the vessel, which was 
needed on the coast of China for the protection of our commerce. 
They sailed from Saldanha Bay, passed up the Mozambique Channel, 
touched at the Comora Islands, whence they crossed the Indian 
Ocean to Quallabattoo, at which time they saw the eflfects of the Po- 
tomac' s visit ten j'^ears previous — the place being utterly ruined. 

From Quallabattoo they passed through the straits of Malacca to 
Singapore, thence up the China Sea to their station, which they 
reached in the beginning of the year 1842. 

Lieutenant Claiborne was in the East Indies on the occasion of 
the opium war between England and China ; returned to the United 
States in the summer of 1844; in the fall of the following year was 
ordered to Pensacola to join the brig Somers, as first lieutenant, 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 89 

]ust before the Mexican war broke out. During the war the Somera 
was engaged in blockading the harbor of Vera Cruz, until her wreck 
off that city the 7th of December, 1846. It was their custom to block- 
ade the harbor all day and at night anchor under Verde Island, off the 
harbor, knowing no vessel would attempt to enter at night, so envi- 
roned was it by reefs. They discovered a vessel on the morning of 
the wreck, at early dawn, running down before the wind, and al- 
though the barometer indicated the approach of a norther, they got 
under way, stood off the harbor, made signals and found her to be a 
sloop of our squadron — the John Adams, from Pensacola. The 
norther was now upon them and freshening to a gale ; they proposed 
anchoring, but just then saw a vessel standing in directly for the 
harbor; being ahead and the weather very hazy they could not see 
the colors of the approaching vessel. Our brig was maneuvered in 
such a way as to prevent the strange vessel from passing the block- 
ade, if such should-be her intention. The wind was blowing furiously ; 
in a moment the brig Somers was on her beam ends. So sudden 
was the disaster several of the crew were drowned below, unable to 
get on deck. The elements were terrific, but all on board were calm 
and collected ; about twenty men who could not swim were put in a 
boat in charge of an officer, and sent to Verde Island. None of the 
officers attempted to get in the boat, preferring to take their chance 
with the crew. "When all hope had vanished that the vessel could 
float longer, the order was given by the commander of the brig, 
••For all to save themselves who could! " About fifty-four of them 
plunged simultaneously into the sea, each availing himself of what- 
ever floating material was at hand. Lieut. Claiborne caught a piece 
of board, about three feet long and a foot and a half wide, and was 
driven by the wind and sea on a reef, whence he was rescued by the 
British frigate Endymeon. The crew of the brig was, all told, 
.seventy-six, of whom forty-four were saved, and thirty-two were 
lost. (See Frost's Naval History of the United States, page 279.) 
Though much enfeebled by the climate and the fatigue attendant 
upon the wreck, Lieut. Claiborne remained in the gulf, attached to the 
steamer Princeton, Com. M. C. Perry. He was present at the land- 
ing of the army at Vera Cruz, and during the siege by Gen. Scott, 
and, subsequently, at the capture of Tuspan and Tabasco by the 
squadron. (See Frost's Naval History of the United States, page 
287.) Lieut. Claiborne reached home in the summer of 1847, and 
resigned his commission in the United States Nav}' in 1849, having 
passed twenty-two years in his country's service, giving to her the 



90 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

flower of his days. Since leaving the service his time has been de- 
voted to the encouragement of railroads, manufactories, city im- 
provements, etc. 

Extract from ' ' Memoirs of Service Afloat, ' ' by Admiral Raphael 
Semmes, page 276: 

December 8th. — This is an anniversary with me. On this day, fifteen 
years ago, the United States brig-of-war, Somers, of which I was the com- 
mander, was capsized and sunk off Vera Cruz, having half her crew of 
120 officers and men drowned. It occurred during the Mexican war. I 
was left alone to blockade the port of Vera Cruz, Commodore Conner, the 
commander of the squadron, having gone with his other ships on an expe- 
dition to Tampico. There being every appearance of a norther on that 
eventful morning, I was still at my anchors, under Isle Verde, or Green 
Island, where I had sought refuge the preceding night. Suddenly, a sail 
was reported running down the northern coast as though she would force 
the blockade. It would never do to permit this, and so the little Somers- 
■ — these ten-gun brigs were called coffins in that day — was gotten under 
way and, under her topsail and courses, commenced beating up the coast 
to intercept the stranger. I had gone below for a moment when the officer 
of the deck, coming to the companion-way, called to me and said that 
•' the water looked black and roughened ahead as though more wind than 
usual was coming." I sprang upon deck and saw at the first glance that a 
norther was upon us. I immediately ordered everything clewed down and 
brailed up, but before the order could be executed the gale came sweeping 
on with the fury of a whirlwind, and in less time than I have been describ- 
ing the event, the little craft was thrown on her beam ends, her masts and 
sails lying flat upon the surface of the sea and the water pouring in at 
every hatchway and scuttle. I clambered to the weather-side of the ship 
and, seeing that she must go down in a few minutes, set my first lieutenant 
at work to extricate the only boat that was available — the weather quarter 
boat, all the others being submerged — from her fastenings to save as much 
life as possible. This was fortunately done, and the boat being put in 
charge of a midshipman, the non-combatant officers, as the surgeon and 
paymaster, the midshipman, and such of the boys of the ship as could not 
swim, were permitted to get into her. So perfect was the discipline though 
death within the next ten minutes stared every man in the face, that 
there was no rush for this boat. A large man was even ordered out of her 
to make room for two lads who could not swim, and he obeyed the order, 
as a matter of course. This boat having shoved off from the sinking ship, 
the order was given, "Every man save himself who can," whereupon there 
was a simultaneous plunge into the now raging sea of a hundred men and 
more, each struggling for his life. The ship sank out of sight in a moment 
afterward. We were in twenty fathoms water. Divesting mj'self of all 
my clothing except my shirt and drawers, I plunged into the sea with the 
rest, and, being a good swimmer, struck out for and reached a piece of 
grating, which had floated away from the ship as she went down. Swim- 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 91 

ming along, with one arm resting on this grating, I felt one of my feet 
touch something, and at the same moment heard a voice exclaiming, " It 
is I, Captain; it is Parker, the second lieutenant. Give me a part of your 
grating; I am a good swimmer, and we shall get along the better together." 
I accordingly shared my grating with Parker, and we both struck out 
manfully for the shore, distant no more than about a mile; but, unfortu- 
nately, the now raging gale was sweeping down parallel with the coast, 
and we were compelled to swim at right angles with the waves and the 
wind if we would save ourselves, for once swept past the coast of the island 
the open sea lay before us, whence there was no rescue. As we would 
rise upon the top of a wave and get a view of the " promised land " the 
reader may imagine how anxious our consultations were as to whether we 
were gaining or losing ground. In the meantime the boat which had 
shoved off from the ship as described had reached the island half swamped, 
and discharging her passengers and freeing herself from water as soon as 
possible, pushed out again into the raging caldron of waters under the gal- 
lant midshipman who had charge of her in the endeavor to rescue some of 
the drowning crew. She came, by the merest accident, upon Parker and 
myself. We were hauled into her, more dead than alive, and after she 
had picked up two or three others, all that could now be seen, she again 
returned to the shore. My first lieutenant, M. G. L. Claiborne, was saved 
as by a miracle, being dashed on shore — he having struck out in the oppo- 
site direction for the mainland— between two ledges of rock, separated only 
by a span of sand beach. If he had been driven upon the rocks instead of 
the beach he must have been instantly dashed in pieces. 

E 2. Eliza, daughter of Wm. T. Lewis, Jr. , of Nashville, Tenn. , 
and his wife, Mary Hipkins, was born about the year 1782. She 
was their oldest, instead of the second daughter, as will be seen by 
the date of her birth and that of her sister, Sarah T., above men- 
tioned. Eliza married, about the year 1801, Governor William 
Charles Cole Claiborne, and went with her husband to New Orleans 
when he was appointed Governor of Louisiana about the year 1803. 
She had only one child, viz. : F 1, Tennessee, born about 1804, and 
died in infancy in New Orleans, La. Her mother, Eliza, also died 
about the same time and was buried in New Orleans. 

[From Claiborne's History, Chapter XXII.] 

Department of State, July 10, 1801. 
Hon. Wm. G. C. Claiborne: 

Sir : The President of the United States, desirous of availing the public 
of your services as Governor of the Mississippi Territory', I have the honor 
of enclosing your commission and of expressing the sentiments of respect 
with which I am, sir. Your most obedient servant, 

James Madison. 



02 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

MR. CLAIBORNE'S REPLY. 

Nashville, Aug. 2, 1801. 
Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge your letter enclosing me a com- 
mission as Governor of the Mississippi Territory. Will you be good enough 
to inform the President that I accept the appointment which he has been 
pleased to confer upon me, and shall endeavor to merit it by a faithful dis- 
charge of the duties which now are, or may be, assigned to me. I know the 
responsibilities and difficulties of the position, but my best exertions shall 
be made to promote the interest of the United States and the prosperity of 
the people of the Territory. I shall make my arrangements for a change 
of residence with all practicable dispatch, but 1 fear these can not be com- 
pleted before the first of October. 

Governor Wm. C. C. Claiborne descended from an ancient family 
of Virginia. In 1624, King Charles the First granted a commission 
appointing Sir Thomas Wyatt Governor, and William Claiborne, with 
others, as council. This is the first mention of William Claiborne. 
(See Campbell's History of Virginia, page 179. ) 

During the years 1627, 1628 and 1629 the Governors of Virginia 
gave authority to William Claiborne, ' ' Secretary of State of this 
Kingdom," as the ancient dominion was then styled, to discover 
the source of the bay or any part of that government from the 
thirty-fourth to the forty-first degree of north latitude. 

In May, 1631, Charles the First granted a license to " our trusty 
and well-beloved W^illiam Claiborne," one of the council and Sec- 
retary of State for the colony, authorizing him to make discoveries 
and to trade, etc. This license was, by the royal instructions, con- 
firmed by Governor Harve}'^, and Claiborne, shortly afterward, 
established a trading post on Kent Island, in the Chesapeake Bay, 
not far from the present capital of Maryland, Annapolis ; and sub- 
sequently, another at the mouth of the Susquehanna river. ( See 
Campbell's History of Virginia, page 188.) 

Colonel William Claiborne the first was buried, probably, in New 
Kent county, Va. He had two sons, William Claiborne, Jr., and 
Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Claiborne. 

A certificate of the valor of William Claiborne, Jr. , is recorded 
in King William County Court House, signed by Sir William Berkely, 
dated in March, 1677, attested by Nathaniel Bacon, Sir Philip Lud- 
low, Ralph Wormley and Richard Lee. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Claiborne, only brother of William 
Claiborne, Jr. , was mortally wounded in the foot by an Indian arrow 
during an engagement with the Indians which took place near West 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 93 

Point, at the head of York river, in King William count}-, where he 
lies buried. 

Each of the sons of Secretary Claiborne had a son named Thomas. 
One of them was styled Captain Thomas Claiborne. 

Colonel Thomas Claiborne, son of the last-mentioned Captain 
Thomas Claiborne, is said to have married three times, and to have 
been the father of twent3^-seven children. One of his daughters 
married a General Philips, of the British Army, and is said to have 
been the mother of Colonel Ralph Philips, of the British Army, who 
fell at Waterloo, and of the distinguished Irish orator who died 
recently. 

Another son, William Claiborne, married a Miss Leigh, of Vir- 
ginia, an aunt of Benjamin Watkins Leigh, U. S. Senator from Vir- 
ginia, and had four sons, viz. : General Ferdinand Leigh Claiborne, 
Governor Wm. C. C. Claiborne, Hon. Nathaniel H. Claiborne and 
Dr. Thomas Augustine Claiborne. 

General F. L. Claiborne distinguished himself in two wars; first, 
with the Indians, and then with Great Britain in 1812. He married 
a Miss Hutcheson and left posterity — among them may be mentioned 
Hon. John F. H. Claiborne, once a member of Congress from Mis- 
sissippi and author of a history of Mississippi. 

Governor Wm. C. C. Claiborne was born in Richmond, Va. , in 
1770. When the Revolutionary war broke out his ancestors espoused 
the cause of the colonies. Young Claiborne spent a short time at 
the College of William and Mary and then returned to the Richmond 
Academy, and there acquired a knowledge of his own, with the 
Latin and Greek languages. He was left poor and had to depend 
entirely upon his own exertions. He left school at fifteen years of 
age and took his departure from Richmond .in a sloop bound for 
New York, where his friend and acquaintance, Mr. Beckley, clerk 
to Congress, gave him employment in his office. Through the influ- 
ence of General John Sevier, he was induced to emigrate to Ten- 
nessee for the purpose of practicing law. He settled in Sullivan 
county and continued at the bar only two years, and his success in 
this short period was equal to that of any lawyer who ever went 
before him. As an advocate in a criminal case it is said he stood 
unrivaled. 

He possessed an uncommonly beautiful face, a fine person, grace- 
ful bearing, urbane manners, a voice well suited to public declama- 
tion, a pleasing, persuasive eloquence, a mild temper and an ardent 
patriotism. Juries have been often dissolved into tears, and enlight- 



94 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

ened tribunals have been deeply moved by his touching eloquence. 
Tennessee demanded admission into the Union, and a convention 
was called to form a State Constitution. Mr. Claiborne was elected 
as a member from Sullivan county. His merit was universally 
acknowledged. 

Governor Blount declared ' ' that, making the necessary allow- 
ance for his youth, he was the most extraordinary man he had met 
with, and that if he lived to attain the age of fifty, nothing but 
prejudice could prevent his becoming one of the most distinguished 
political characters in America. ' ' General Sevier was elected Gov- 
ernor of the new State of Tennessee, and among his first acts was 
the appointment of Mr. Claiborne as a Judge of the Supreme Court 
of Law and Equity of the State. 

He continued but a short time in this office when a vacancy 
occurred in the House of Representatives of the United States, when 
he resigned his seat, at the request of his friends, and became a can- 
didate for Congress and was elected by an overwhelming majority 
over his opponent. He was the youngest man who had ever 
appeared on the floor of Congress. His speeches seem to be a spon- 
taneous effort; the object was to persuade and convince, not to sur- 
prise; they had passion and feeling in every sentence, but it was 
the passion of the heart bent on the conviction of others. He re- 
mained only a few years in Congress, when a serious misunderstand- 
ing having arisen between the people of the Mississippi Territory 
and their then Governor, many distinguished individuals of that 
country signified a wish for the appointment of Mr. Claiborne as 
their Governor, and in conformity therewith, he received an appoint- 
ment to that office in 1801, from President Jefferson. He reached 
Natchez on the 23d of November, 1801, where he was received with 
enthusiasm, and immediately entered upon the duties of his office. 
He had lately married Miss Eliza, daughter of Wm. Terrell Lewis, 
of Nashville, Tenn. She was tall and graceful, with perfect sym- 
metry of features, and her indulgent parents had early procured for 
her those advantages of education that add new charms to the 
female character. Thus blessed with the affections of an amiable 
wife, and without an enemy on earth, Mr. Claiborne spent two years 
as Governor of the Mississippi Territory.' Having been appointed 
Governor-General and Intendent of the province of Louisiana, he 
repaired to New Orleans, where the people soon became attached to 
him, and when they were admitted into the Union as an independ- 
ent State in 1812, they sanctioned the choice of the General Govern- 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 95 

ment by electing him Governor with an almost unanimous voice. 
During the first summer in which he had been exposed to that cli- 
mate, he had nearly succumbed himself to an attack of the yellow 
fever; his lad}' fell a victim to that fatal disease; .his infant 
daughter ( Tennessee ) accompanied her mother, and his brother-in- 
law, 3'oung Lewis, who had followed him to Louisiana, fell in a duel. 
All three had expired on the same day, and were consigned to the 
same tomb. 

In 1814 and 1815, during the invasion of Louisiana by the 
English, Mr. Claiborne was in the executive chair of Louisiana, 
and had been active in preparing the military defense of the 
country, and gave General Jackson all the necessary information 
relative thereto. He voluntarily surrendered to the General the 
command of the militia of the State, and consented to receive his 
orders. 

It was not the fortune of Gov. Claiborne to participate person- 
ally in the contest of the 8th of January. He had received orders 
from Gen. Jackson to repair with his troops to Gentilly, to occupy 
the important pass of Chef Menteur, where it was feared that the 
English had made a division; he obeyed, marched to that station, 
which he fortified, and remained in that command during the whole 
contest which terminated in the memorable battle of New Orleans. 
Thus guided by the firm integrity, the virtue, and the sincere and 
warm devotion to his country, which particularly distinguished him, 
Gov. Claiborne had sustained his character throughout his eventful 
administration as a pure, devoted, able, dignified and virtuous chief 
magistrate. It was his lot to have been at the helm of the im- 
portant post of Louisiana during all the critical periods of our early 
collisions with Spain upon our Southern borders, of the Burr con- 
spiracy, and of the invasion of Louisiana by the British Army. In 
all these circumstances he remained the able agent and the faithful 
sentinel of his country upon the outskirts of the Union. No man 
had ever enjoyed greater honors at so early an age ; seldom has vir- 
tue been awarded by a more rapid and brilliant career. When he 
was first appointed Governor-General of the province of Louisiana 
with almost unbounded authority, all were pleased with the bland- 
ness of his manners and the beauty of his person ; they were aston- 
ished to see so young a man invested with so high a trust; but the 
subsequent virtue and wisdom of his measures during a long and 
tempestuous administration of thirteen years, excited the love and 
admiration of all, and have left in the memory of his countrymen of 



96 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Louisiana a monument more lasting than the marble which they 
have consecrated to his virtues. 

After the death of Eliza Lewis, the first wife of Gov. Claiborne, 
he married Miss Clarissa Duralde, a young Creole lady of great 
beauty and mental qualities, whom he had the misfortune to lose, 
also, two years after marriage. 

He again married in 1812, Miss Bosque, an accomplished lady of 
Spanish extraction, who survived his death in 1817, and afterwards, 
married John R. Grr3^mes, Esq., the eminent New Orleans lawyer; 
and a daughter of the Governor married John H. B. Latrobe, Esq. , 
of Baltimore, Md. 

E 3. Micajah Green, son of Major Wm. T. Lewis, Jr., of Nash- 
ville, Tenn., was born about the year 1784, in Wilkes county, N. C. 
He emigrated with his father from Wilkes county to Nashville, Tenn. , 
about the year 1793, being about nine or ten years of age at the time. 
He was a fine-looking young man, highly educated, being a graduate 
of Princeton College, N. J., and very promising. He went to New 
Orleans with his brother-in-law. Governor Wm. C. C. Claiborne, got 
into a difficulty with Major Sterrett, with whom he fought a duel and 
was killed the same day that his sister, Mrs. Eliza Claiborne, and 
her infant daughter died; all three of whom were interred in the 
same tomb. 

E 4. Mary, daughter of Major Wm. T. Lewis, Jr., of Nashville, 
Tenn., was born about 1786. She married Alfred Balch, a lawyer 
of Nashville, Tenn. , and died childless soon after marrying. 

E 5. Myra, daughter of Major Wm. T. Lewis, Jr., of Nashville, 
Tenn., was born about 1788. She married Major John H. Eaton, 
a cousin of Governor Wm. C. C. Claiborne. She survived her mar- 
riage but a short time, died childless and was buried at her father' s 
family burying-ground near Nashville, Tenn. 

Major Eaton was born in 1788; was a lawyer by profession. He, 
together with General John Coffee, were commissioners in behalf of 
the United States to treat with the Choctaw Indians at Dancing 
Rabbit Creek Treaty in 1830. 

Major Eaton was a Senator in Congress from Tennessee from 1818 
to 1829. He was Secretary of War in 1829, during General Jack- 
son' s administration. From 1834 to 1836 he was Governor of Florida. 
In 1836 he was appointed by General Jackson as Envoy Extraordi- 
nary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Spain. 

After the death of Myra Lewis, his first wife, which took place in 
Nashville, Tenn. , he married the Widow Timberlake in Washington 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 97 

City, whose maiden name was Oneal, and with whom he lived many 
years in Washington City. Major Eaton's name has been very inti- 
mately associated with the administration of General Jackson. His 
widow survived his death in 1856. 

E 6. Charlotte, daughter of Major Wm. T. Lewis, Jr. , of Nash- 
ville, Tenn., was born about the year 1792, in Wilkes county, N. C. 
In 1820 she married Major Isaac Lewis Baker, and survived her 
marriage only a few months and died childless. Major Baker was 
born in Mason count}', Ky. , in 1792, was a lawj-er by profession and 
died in St. Martinsville, La., in 1830. He was a soldier in the war 
of 1812, was in the battle of the River Baisin in 1813, as an ensign. 
(An account of said battle may be found in Mile's Register of 1813.) 
He was afterward made captain of a company of the 44th Regiment 
of the regular army, was at the taking of Pensacola and was in all 
the fighting about New Orleans from December 23, 1814, until after 
Januarys, 1815. Being the oldest captain in the 44th Regiment 
at New Orleans, General Jackson so managed as to give him the 
command of a regiment during the siege. He commanded the 44th 
Regiment, which was formed on the extreme left. ( See Life of Gen- 
eral A. Jackson, by Jenkins, page 107, and Watson's History of the 
United States, page 773.) He was, after the battle of New Orleans, 
one of General Jackson's aide-de-camps. 

Major Isaac L. Baker was a most excellent man, was loved and 
respected by all who knew him. At the time of his death he was a 
sugar planter in St. Martinsville, La., and had been a member of 
the Legislature of that State. He was a very able writer and wrote 
a great deal for the public journals of his State under various names. 
The one over the signature of ^^ Aminiadab Sledgehammer'" gave 
him very high standing as a writer. 

Major Baker was a brother of Judge Joshua Baker, of Franklin, 
La. , and was a son of Joshua Baker, from Berkley county, Va. , who 
married Susan Lewis, daughter of Rev. Isaac Lewis. Joshua Baker, 
Sr. , was one of the first settlers of Kentuck}', was in the Convention 
from Mason county with Thomas Marshall (brother of Chief Justice 
John Marshall) and General Philomel Thomas. He commanded 
General Wayne's spy company of the Kentucky troops in 1794, was 
in some of the fighting in 1815 at New Orleans, and died in 1816. 
The following sketch of Rev. Isaac Lewis we copy from Blake's. 
Biographical Dictionary, page 743: 

Isaac Lewis, D. D., was an American clergyman, renowned for his lon- 
gevity and excellent character ; was born February 1, 1746, in that part of 
7 



98 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Long Island now called Huntington. He entered Yale College in 1761, and 
graduated in 1765. In 1768 he commenced preaching, and was first settled 
in the town of Wilton, Conn. During his residence in this place the mem- 
orable struggle of the American Revolution occurred, and, deeply sympa- 
thizing with his countrymen, he spent much of his time in the camp 
encouraging and comforting them. 

After the burning of Norwalk by the enemy, he was invited by the 
inhabitants to preach to them in an unfinished building, the only one that 
remained. He did so from the following appropriate text: 

" Our holy and our beautiful house, where our fathers worshiped Thee, 
is burned up with fire, and all our pleasant things are laid waste. Wilt Thou 
refrain Thyself for these things, Oh, Lord? Wilt Thou hold Thy peace and 
-afflict us very sore? " 

In 1786 he removed from Wilton and settled in Greenwich, situate in 
the same county, where he remained until 1818. In 1816 he was chosen 
a fellow of Yale College. 

When dismissed from his church in Greenwich, at his own request, he 
was seventy-two j^ears of age, but he still continued to reside among that 
people until the day of his death, and until he was ninety years of age he 
occasionally addressed them. The great age which he attained commanded 
the veneration of all who knew him, and his excellent character. Christian 
integrity, urbane and courteous manners, together with his social virtues 
and great learning, secured their esteem and love. 

Dr. Lewis died August 27, 1840, in the ninety-fifth year of his age and 
in the seventy-second year of his ministry. 

E 7. Margaret, daughter of Maj. Wm. T. Lewis, Jr., of Nash- 
ville, Tenn. , was born about the year 1793. Her father, having lost 
his only son in a duel at New Orleans, saw that his name would be- 
come extinct, enjoined his daughter to marry a man by her own 
name. She married Maj. Wm. B. Lewis, son of John, of London 
county, Va. Major Lewis was a lawyer by profession ; was Second 
Auditor of the Treasury Department at Washington City during 
General Jackson's administration, and has been a member of the 
State Legislature of Tennessee. They had but one daughter, 
viz. : 

F 1. Mary Ann, who married Mons. Alp house Pageot (pro- 
nounced pa-zhe-o ), a Minister Plenipotentiary from France, at Wash- 
ington City, during Jackson's administration. They reside in Paris, 
France, and they also had but one child, viz. : G 1, Andrew Jack- 
son Pageot, who was an officer in the French Army, and died single. 

Margaret, the wife of Maj. Wm. B. Lewis, like all her sisters, 
died at an early age. Maj. Wm. B. Lewis now owns and resides 
at the Fairfield House, in the suburbs of Nashville, Tenn. , the late 
residence of Maj. Wm. T. Lewis his first father-in-law. After the 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 99 

<leath of Maj. Wm. B. Lewis' first wife, he married a daughter of 
Gov. Stokes, of North Carolina. 

Wheeler, in his History of North Carolina, committed an error in 
saying on page 143, that Mons. Alphonse married the daughter of 
Maj. Wm. B. Lewis' second wife — it was the only daughter by his 
first wife, Margaret Lewis. 

D 10. Col. Joel Lewis, son of Wm. T., Sr., of Nashville, Tenn., 
was born in Albemarle county, Va. , in 1760. He was a large man, 
of great muscular strength. He had just entered college at Lexing- 
ton, Va., when the tocsin of war sounded for the Revolutionary 
war. He threw aside his books, returned to his father's in Surry 
county, N. C, volunteered his services in behalf of the colonies, 
shouldered his musket and joined the first company that left his 
•county, in which he was elected as one of the lieutenants. He 
served his country until there was a demand for more soldiers, when 
he returned home, made up a company and was elected its captain. 
The company, it is said, consisted mostly of his cousins, uncles, etc. ; 
there being not less than twenty-two of his relations belonging to 
his company. It was while he was acting as captain of his company 
that the battle of King' s Mountain came off. Col. Cleveland being 
a corpulent man could not climb the mountain very well, conse- 
quently he requested Colonel (then Captain) Joel Lewis to lead his 
left wing in closing around the enemy. 

In this battle Col. Joel Lewis was twice wounded — once in the 
thumb and once in the leg. A short time before the war closed, Col. 
Joel Lewis returned home by order of his commanding oflEicer, 
raised a new regiment, was elected its lieutenant-colonel ; set out on 
their march to join the main body of the army ; but before he reached 
them news came that Lord Cornwallis had surrendered at York- 
town. (See "King's Mountain and its Heroes," pages 247, 260, 
261, 304, 457, 458, 461 and 588.) After the surrender of Furgu- 
son's army, a misunderstanding occurred between John Armstrong 
and Col. Joel Lewis, which resulted in a sword encounter. In 1784, 
Joel Lewis represented Surry county, N. C, in the lower branch of 
the State Legislature. (See Yf heeler' s History of North Carolina, 
page 410.) 

About the year 1793, Joel Lewis emigrated with his father and 
brothers from North Carolina to Nashville, Tenn., where he was 
elected in 1796 as the first Senator in the State Legislature from 
Davidson county. (See DeBow's Review, Vol. II, No. 1, July, 
1859.) He was one of a committee appointed to wait on his Excel- 



100 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

lency, John Sevier, and request his attendance in the House of Rep- 
resentatives to be qualified as Governor. Andrew Jackson, Col. Joel 
Lewis and others were members of a convention from Davidson 
county, to meet at Nashville in 1796. 

Wm. Terrell Lewis, Jr., emigrated with his father from Albe- 
marle county, Va., to Surry county, N. C, and from Surry to Nash- 
ville or Davidson county, Tenn., about the year 1793, where he died 
in 1816. After his death, his widow married Col. Crabb, near Win- 
chester, Tenn. Col. Joel Lewis and his wife had eighteen children, 
viz. : 

E 1. Sarah Martin, born about 1786; married Jas. King and 
Col. Thos. Claiborne. 

E 2. James Martin, born about 1788; married Sarah Barfield. 

E 3. John Haywood, born about 1790; married Mary Betts. 

E 4. 1st Eastham, born about 1792; died single. 

E 5. Miriam, born about 1794; died seventeen years of age. 

E 6. Eliza Augusta, born about 1796; married Dr. Wm. W. Lea. 

E 7. William Dixon, born about 1798; married Sallie Sellers and 
Jane Terrell. 

E 8. Hickman, born about 1801; married Virginia Lindsay. 

E 9. William C. Claiborne, born about 1803; died young. 

E 10. Rachel, born about 1805; died young. 

E 11. Mary Louisa, born about 1807; married Ed. R. Wallace. 

E 12. Anna Octavia, born about 1810; married Wm. Knox. 

E 13. Capt. Joel, born about 1812; never married. 

E 14. 2d Eastham, born about 1814; died single. 

E 15. Darthula, born about 1816; married Mr. Harrison. 

E 16. Lucy, born about 1818; died sixteen years of age. 

E 17. David, born about 1820; died in childhood. 

E 18. Micajah, born about 1822; died in childhood. 

Joel Lewis was born in Albemarle county, Va., August 28th,. 
1760; early settled in Surry county; commanded a company at 
King's Mountain, said to have embraced among its members, twenty- 
two of his own family connections. A colored freeman named Bow- 
man, of his company, claimed to have killed Furguson, and Captain 
Lewis secured some of the British commander's arms — one a jewel- 
hilted poniard, which he retained many years. He married Miriam 
Eastham, and had eighteen children. In 1784, he was chosen to 
represent Surry in the House of Commons, and in 1789 he removed 
to Nashville, Tenn. , where he was an early hotel-keeper. [ It was 
his brother Wm. T., that kept the hotel.] In 1796 he was a mem- 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 101 

ber of the Convention that formed the first Constitution of Ten- 
nessee, and was the same year, and again in 1799, elected a State 
Senator. He held other public positions, and died near Nashville, 
November 22, 1816. He left many worthy descendants. His 
younger brother, James Martin Lewis, born in 1762, who was a lieu- 
tenant at King's Mountain, married Mary, daughter of Col. Ben- 
jamin Herndon, and died at Columbia, Tenn. , in 1830. 

E 1. Sarah Martin, daughter of Colonel Joel Lewis, was born 
about 1786. She was twice married, first in 1802 to James King, 
son of Thomas, an Irish merchant of Nashville, Tenn., by whom she 
had three children. Her second husband, whom she married in 
1812, was Major Thomas Claiborne, M. C, from Nashville, by whom 
she had nine children. They both died in Nashville. Their children 
were, viz. : 

F 1. William King, was born about 1803; married Sarah Beckem 

and Miss Poston ; went to California ; edited a paper called the 

Bulletin in San Francisco; was the originator of the Vigilance Com- 
mittee there, and was killed by James Casey. 

He left children, viz.: Gr 1, William, married a Miss Leftwick 
and was killed in the Confederate war; G 2, Sally; G 3, James, 
Jiilled in the war. 

F 2. Thomas King, son of Sarah M. , died single. 

F 3. Rachel Mary Elizabeth King, born about 1807; married 
Dr. Alexander McCall, a very distinguished physician residing at 
Nashville, Tenn. His father, grandfather and great grandfather 
were by the name of Alexander. His mother was a daughter of 
General Martin Armstrong, who was a brother of John Armstrong, 
of Surry county, N. C. ( See Wheeler's History of North Carolina, 
page 410.) Alexander McCall, the father of Dr. McCall, had resided 
at Wilmington, N. C, but from 1794 until 1805 he resided at old 
Richmond, then came to Smith county, Tenn. , where they both died. 
The following are the names of the children of Dr. A. McCall and 
his wife, R. M. E. King, viz. : 

G 1. Sarah, married Hugh McKrea; has children at Nashville, 
Tenn. 

G 2. James King, was for many years in the United States 
Army, and was a captain of a company in the Confederate war. 

G 3. Fannie, died single. 

G 4. Alexina, married P. P. Peck, Nashville, Tenn. 

G 5. Myra, married Jo. Wheeless, of Nashville, Tenn. 

G 6. Aileen. 



102 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

G 7. William, married Jeanie Fullerton and was in the Confed- 
erate Army. 

■ F 4. John Claiborne, son of Mrs. Sarah by her second husband, 
was a member of General Ruggles' staff. He died single. 

F 5. Henry Laurens Claiborne, was a quartermaster in the Con- 
federate War. He married a daughter of Dr. Steele, of Kentucky^ 
and resides at Nashville, Tenn. 

F 6. Mary Clayton Claiborne, married John Ramage, a merchant 
of Nashville, Tenn. , and had two children, viz. : 

G 1. John C. Ramage. 

G 2. Henry Ramage, was killed at Marietta, Ga., in 1864; he- 
was a soldier of the Confederate Army. 

F 7. James Claiborne, died single. 

F 8. Anastasia Claiborne, died single. 

F 9. Col. Thomas Burwell Claiborne, was a captain in the 3d 
Regiment of mounted riflemen of the United States Army, and was 
promoted for gallant conduct in the war of Mexico— particularly in 
the battle of Huamautla, where he repulsed the enemy by holding 
his pistol at the touch-hole of the cannon he had captured, as though 
he would fire on them, when the cannon was not loaded. He mar- 
ried Anna Maxwell, and resides at Nashville, Tenn. 

F 10. Charlotte Claiborne, died. 

F 11. Sarah Claiborne, and 

F 12. Duncan Robinson, died. 

E 2. James M., son of Col. Joel Lewis, of Davidson county, 
Tenn., was born about 1788. He was familiary styled by the sou- 
briquet of ' ' Old Jim Lewis. ' ' He was a soldier, sailor and traveler. 
He was with General Jackson in the Seminole and other Indian wars, 
and was wounded in the wrist and hip. He was with Jack- 
son at the battle of New Orleans on the 8th of January, 1815, as 
one of his body-guard. Favorable mention is made of him by Gen. 
Jackson in his report of the battle of the Horse-shoe, and also of the 
battle of New Orleans. ( See life of Jackson. ) He married Sarah Bar- 
field, and lived in Obion county, Tenn. He was very fond of hunt- 
ing. On one occasion he went into the Mississippi swamp with his 
dog and gun on a hunting excursion. While there it set in to raining 
and continued for several days, until all the bayous, creeks, etc., 
were full to overflowing, where he and his dog had no chance to es- 
cape from the swamp except by swimming — being entirely sur- 
rounded by water, and without provisions. He at length killed a 
fine, fat bear, upon which he and his dog feasted until the waters sub- 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 103 

sided, so that they could return home. In the meantime he and his 
dog entirely devoured the bear, leaving nothing but a pile of bones 
behind them. About the year 1851 he left Obion county, Tenn., 
and went to California and taught the Mendocino Indians agricul- 
ture. 

James M. Lewis had but two children by Sarah Barfleld, his 
wife, viz. : 

F 1. Frederick B., married a Miss Bigham, and resides in Pemi- 
scot county, Mo. 

F 2. Thomas Claiborne, died single. 

E 3. John Haj-wood, son of Col. Joel Lewis, of Davidson county, 
Tenn., graduated at the University of Tennessee, having two de- 
grees, A. B. , and M. A., conferred upon him. He practiced law 
fourteen years in Huntsville, Ala., and retired in 1841. In 1824, he 
married Mary Betts, at the Xorth, she having been educated at Litch- 
field, Conn. ; she was the only daughter of Sam Betts, a merchant of 
Havana Island, of Cuba. John H. Lewis, after ha\ing eleven chil- 
dren by Mary Betts, his wife, died in Huntsville, Ala., in 1859. The 
following are the names of his children : 

F 1. Mary, born about 1825; married John "Withers Clay, son of 
Gov. Clement C. Clay, and resides at Huntsville, Ala. He is a law- 
yer by profession, and is a brother of Clem C. Clay, Jr. 

[From the Macou Beacon.] 

Ex-Governor C. C. Clay, of Alabama, is dead. He died at his resi- 
dence near Huntsville, on the 6th inst. , in his 77th year. 

The Independent says: 

He filled many important offices in Alabama, having been, at various 
times, Judge, member of the State Legislature, Representative in Congress, 
Senator of the United States and Governor of the State. He was, through- 
out his long life, not only the recipient of public honors, but eminently 
respected and esteemed for his private and domestic virtues. Appropriate 
honors were paid to his memory by the corporation and citizens of Hunts- 
ville, and the shops and other places of business were closed on the after- 
noon of the 7th, when his funeral took place. 

Gov. Clem C. Clay was born in Halifax county, Va. ; his father, 
Wm. Clay, son of James Clay, and his mother, Rebecca, daughter 
of Sam Comer, were Virginians and of English descent. 

F 2. Ellen, daughter of John H. Lewis, was born about 1827; 
married Gabriel Jordan, a graduate of the Military School in Vir- 
ginia, and engineer of the Memphis & Charleston EaiLroad ; resides 
at Huntsville, Ala. 



104 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

F 3. Eliza, born about 1829; married her cousin, Wm. W. Lea, 
son of Dr. Wm. W. Lea, and his wife, Eliza A. Lewis. They reside 
at Knoxville, Tenn, 

F 4. Sarah, born about 1831. 

F 5. John, born about 1833. 

F 6, Myra, died; F 7, Wm. Lindsay, died single. 

F 8. Heber, died; F 9, Florida; F 10, Elodia, and 

F 11. Lucy. 

E 6. Eliza Augusta, daughter of Col. Joel Lewis, born about 
1796; married, in 1825, Dr. Wm. Wilson Lea, son of Maj. Lea, near 
Knoxville, Tenn. , and grandson of Luke Lea, originally from King 
and Queen county, Va. Dr. Wm. W. Lea lived, at different times, 
in Nashville, Tenn., Trenton, Tenn., Fulton, Tenn., Noxubee county, 
Miss. , and then back to Trenton, Tenn. , where he died. Eliza A. , 
his first wife, died in Trenton, Tenn., in 1837. His second wife 
was a Miss Lindsay, daughter of Col. William Lindsay, of the 
United States Army. Eliza Augusta Lea had eleven children, 
viz. : 

F 1. William Luke, born about 1826: died two years of age. 

F 2. Myra, died twenty-one years of age. 

F 3. Mary Louisa, born about 1830; married Charles E. Butler, 
of Carrolton, Ala. , and has children, viz. : 

G 1. Charles Lea; G 2, Martha Love; G 3, Wm. Lea; G4, Albert 
Lea; G 5, Joel Louis, etc. 

F 4. Walter Scott, son of Dr. Wm. W. Lea, died at the age of 
seven. 

F 5. Eliza Augusta, died at the age of twenty-two. 

F 6. William Wilson, married his cousin, Eliza L. Lewis, daugh- 
ter of John T. Lewis, of Huntsville, Ala. 

F 7. Albert, married Rosa Bacon, of Fulton, Tenn. 

F 8. Sarah Harper, died at the age of sixteen. 

F 9. Laura, died at the age of sixteen. 

F 10. Pryor, killed at the battle of Shiloh. 

F 11. Joel Lewis, married Anna Hartgrove, of Fulton, Tenn. 

E 7. William Dixon, son of Colonel Joel Lewis, was born about 
1799. About 1821 he married Sarah Sellers, by whom he had two 
children. His wife dying about 1832, he married, as his second 
wife, Miss Jane Terrell, in Obion county, Tenn., by whom he had 
no children. He died of cholera in Gibson county, Tenn., in 1832. 
The following are the names of his two children : 

F 1. Joel R., married a Miss Davidson in Obion county, Tenn. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 105 

F 2. Mary Louisa, born in 1823, at Eaton, Gibson county, Tenn. 
Her father dying wlien she was but nine years of age, she was 
Taised by Dr. Wm. W. Lea, in Fulton, Tenn. , where she married, in 
1840, J. M. Alexander, a merchant residing in Fulton, Tenn. In 
1860 Marj' Louisa died, leaving six children, viz. : 

Ct 1. Elizabeth Lea, born 1841 and died in 1860. 

G 2. Wm. Dixon, born 1843. 

G 3. Laura ; G 4, Anna ; G 5, Amanda ; G 6, Sallie. 

E 8. Hickman, son of Colonel Joel Lewis, was born in Davidson 
•county, Tenn., in 1801. He was six feet in height and was a fine- 
looking man. He served a campaign at sixteen years of age in the 
Seminole war under General Jackson. 

Hickman Lewis was once engaged in the salt works of Abingdon, 
Virginia; afterward he lived in Limestone county, Ala., where he 
married Virginia Lindsay. He then moved to Huntsville, Ala., and 
•engaged in merchandising. Virginia Lindsa}' was a daughter of 
Colonel William Lindsay, who was born in Norfolk, Va. , and 
entered the United States Army in 1812. He died in the house of 
John H. Lewis, in Huntsville, Ala., in 1837. Hickman Lewis died 
in Huntsville, Ala., in 1842, after which his widow moved to Noxu- 
bee county, Miss., in 1844, and married Dr. A. S. Whorton in 1845, 
and resided in Noxubee county, where she died. Hickman Lewis 
had five children, viz. : 

F 1. Joel, died in childhood. 

F 2. Mary, married Joseph W. Youngblood, who lived in Laud- 
erdale count}', Tenn., and in Memphis. He was a soldier of the 
Confederate Army, was Captain of the Signal Corps and was taken 
prisoner near Baton Rouge, La. Mary, his wife, died in 1865. 

F 3. Dr. Samuel Pete, son of Hickman Lewis, attended a course 
of medical lectures in Nashville, Tenn., and finally graduated in 
medicine in New Orleans in 1860. He was a first lieutenant of Cap- 
tain "Coger's company from Noxubee county. Miss., during the Con- 
federate war. He was wounded at the first Manassas battle and 
4ilso in the Perryville fight. After the close of the war he located at 
Webster, Winston county, Miss., where he sold drugs and practiced 
medicine a few years, then went to Waco, Tex., and died there in 
1870 or 1871. He never married. 

F 4. Hon. Clark, son of Hickman Lewis, was a soldier in the 
Confederate war and married Hattie, daughter of Tyree Spaun, of 
Noxubee county. Miss., where he is now engaged in farming. His 
post-ofBce is Cliftonville, Miss, 



106 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

HON. CLARK LEWIS. 

LouisviiiLE, Miss., May 31, 1888. 

In this issue of the Signal we announce the name of this distinguished 
citizen of Noxubee county for Congress in this the Fourth District, subject ta 
the action of the Democratic nominating convention. Born and reared in 
Noxubee county, he has made for himself a record both brilliant and 
useful. 

In his young manhood, for four years, in the capacity of a private, he 
illustrated that valor characteristic of the chivalric Southern soldier, and 
after the surrender, when the dark clouds of Radicalism almost shut out 
the sunlight of hope, there was not one who, with more patriotic zeal, 
devoted himself to the restoration of our State government. 

In 1878 he was nominated and elected by the Democracy of Nox- 
ubee to the Legislature, and in that body, composed of the best talent 
of the State, was at once recognized as one of its leading members. Mr. 
Lewis, although a man of commanding ability, instead of choosing one of 
the learned professions, is a planter, thus illustrating by his success that 
brains and perseverance tell in the field as well as in the forum and legis- 
lative halls. 

In addition to his well-known competency and ability, he comes indorsed 
by his own county, the largest in the district, which shows the confidence 
his own people have in him. A thorough scholar, a graceful speaker, a 
practical farmer, a Christian gentleman and an ardent Democrat, we 
present his name to the Democratic party of Winston county as a 
man in every way worthy to become the successor of the Hon. H. D. 
Money. 

In November, 1888, Clark Lewis was elected as a member of 
Congress from the Fourth Congressional District of Mississippi. The 
votes stood: Lewis, 12,855; M. K. Mister, 2,396; Lewis' majority, 
10,459. 

The Philadelphia Press gives biographical sketches and cuts of 
the new members in the present Congress in various States. Of 
Hon. Clark Lewis it says: 

Mississippi sends one new member in her delegation of seven. Clark 
Lewis is his name, and he is a fine specimen of a self-made Southerner. 
He was the son of a poor man, and just as he had earned a little money 
teaching, his hope of a college education was cut off by the war. He enlisted 
as an infantry man, but broke his leg before he saw service. As soon as 
he could he went into the cavalry. In seven months he was sent home dis- 
abled. Then he tried the artillery and served through the war — the last 
six months of it as a prisoner at Elmira, N. Y. After the war he taught 
school, kept store, farmed and served in the Legislature. He is a manly, 
able fellow, tall and handsome, and kindly. He is a Farmers' Alliance- 
man. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 107 

HON. CLARK LEWIS, THE NEW MEMBER FROM MISSISSIPPL 
[Kansas City Times.] 

Washington, D. C, March 20. 

The personnel of Congress is constantly changing, more than one-third 
of the Representatives in each Congress being new men. The habitues of 
the House gallery study these new comers and hazard opinions as to their 
talent, future usefulness, etc.; so while the old leaders are eagerly inquired 
for by the visiting stranger, the Washingtonian is more interested in the 
" first termers." Clark Lewis, the only new member from Mississippi, has 
received much more than ordinary attention, for the reason that he is a 
striking figure — tall, robust, erect and handsome, with fine gray eyes, florid 
complexion, aquiline nose and firm mouth ; and because he is a genuine 
farmer, not theoretical or professional, but a practical farmer whose broad 
fields in Noxubee county show that intelligent farming pays. 

Clark Lewis is nearly fifty, but looks hardly forty — the result of tem- 
perance, abundant exercise, open air and generous living. The war pre- 
vented his taking his diploma, but he was well educated at the famous 
Summerville Academy, under Thomas Gathright, one of the most distin- 
guished educators of the South. He then taught school for two years, but 
when the war came on he answered the call to arms. On account of a 
broken leg he was transferred from the infantry to the cavalry service, and 
then to the heavy artillery, and did his whole duty throughout the stru"-o-le. 
Mr. Lewis received the best education a man can have — that which he 
gives himself. He is a reader, a student and a thinker. He has a taste 
for solid literature and, while a consistent church member, is not afraid to 
read the subtleties of the positivist philosophers and the agnosticism of the 
scientists. 

The writer has been told by a schoolmate of Mr. Lewis and a compe- 
tent judge of mental power, that Mr. Lewis had the most massive and 
virile intellect he had ever known. While Mr. Lewis' temper is combative, 
his manner is courteous and conciliatory. In opinion he is entirely inde- 
pendent, and, aided by experience in the State Legislature, he easily 
adapts himself to his duties in the House and in committee, where he is a 
diligent, working, influential member. Mr. Lewis has not yet addressed 
the House, but from his conversational vocabulary and mental vigor a 
speaker may be expected well in line with his older colleagues who have 
made national reputations. When the farmers of his district sent him to 
Congress they evidently wanted a worker, and certainly they will not be 
disappointed. Mr. Lewis was defeated for nomination to a prior Congress 
by the fraction of a vote, but his majority when elected was 10,459 in a 
district where the Republican papers say people are not allowed to vote. 
It is safe to say that Mr. Lewis will succeed himself without opposition in 
his own partj'. 

Mr. Lewis represents fully the views of his constituents, and of agri- 
culturists generally, on the tariff, and is prepared to fight high taxes over 



108 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

€very inch of ground ; but from the present outlook it seems the Ways and 
Means Committee will have so much trouble arranging their own discord- 
ant views our Democratic Congressmen will have short time for tariff dis- 
cussion this session. 

Mr. Lewis' friends say he is very companionable, as men of his class in 
the South generally are, and always ready to oblige an acquaintance and 
serve a friend. 

If going to the farmers for material brings into Congress such sound 
stamina, mental, moral and physical, as is shown in Mr. Lewis, more of the 
same sort would be vastly beneficial. An honorable and successful career 
is predicted for the new Mississippi member. 

HON. CLARK LEWIS. 

The following is taken from the Clodhopper, Kosciusko, Miss.: 

" We would feel perfectly at ease in saying to Mr. Lewis that if he will 
■consent to allow his farmer friends to put his name forward as a candidate 
for the United States Senate, he would be sure of Attalla's vote, and if he 
would defend these views over the State, we believe he would capture the 
prize. The farmers must put these demands into effect or the Alliance 
had best to quit and turn themselves over to the element inside the Demo- 
cratic party, that always has and always will oppose them. Can the Hon. 
Clark Lewis be induced to let his name be used as a candidate for the 
United States Senate? " 

The above is supplemented by a letter in the Mississippian, from Noxu- 
bee county, of which the following is an extract : 

" The Democracy of this district offer their Congressman, Hon. Clark 
Lewis, to the Democracy and Alliance of the State as a suitable man to 
represent us in that august body. Hon. Clark Lewis has just finished his 
first term in the lower House and has been re-elected without opposition in 
the Democratic ranks to succeed himself. Mr. Lewis has taken a high 
stand among our national legislators, and deservedly so, for he is eminently 
well qualified for such a position. 

F 5. Martha, daughter of Hickman Lewis, died in childhood. 

E 11. Mary Louisa, daughter of Col. Joel Lewis, of Davidson 
county, Tenn., was born in 1808. She married, in Nashville, Tenn., 
Judge Ed. R. Wallace, who lived in Winchester, Russellville, Ky., 
Morgan county, Ala. , and, finally, at Aberdeen, Miss. , where he died. 
He was a lawyer by profession and was once Judge of the County 
Court in Morgan county, Ala. After the death of Mary Louisa, his 
first wife, he married Virginia Penn. Mary Louisa died in Hunts- 
ville, Ala., in 1837. She had six children, viz. : 

F 1. William, was born aboiit 1826; married Amelia Paul. 

F 2. George, born about 1828. 

F 3. Edwin R. , Jr. , born about 1830 ; killed in Knoxville, in 1863. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 109' 

F 4. Joel, born about 1832; died young. 

F 5. Cliaiies, born about 1834; resides at Huntsville, Ala. 

F 6. Mary Louisa, born about 1836; died. 

E 12. Anna Octavia, daughter of Col. Joel Lewis, born about 
1810; married Wm. Knox, who was a merchant and banker in Mont- 
gomery, Ala. He died in 1869. She had fourteen children, viz. : 

F 1. John, was drowned. 

F 2. Joel, married. 

F 3. William C. Claiborne, died. 

F 4. Myra, married T. J. Semmes ; resides at New Orleans and 
has children, viz.: Gr 1. William Knox, died; G 2, Myra, etc. 

F 5. William Hickman, died. 

F 6. Anna Isabel, married Donnell and Paul ; resides at Mont- 
gomery', Ala., and has children, viz.: Gr 1, John R. Donnell; G 2, 
Isabel Donnell; G 3, Mary Donnell; G 4, Lucy Paul, etc. 

F 7. William K., married Ann Coxe; resides at Montgomery, 
Ala., and has children, viz. : G 1, Anna Octavia Lewis; G 2, Wm. 
Knox, died. 

F 8. John Haywood, died; F 9, Robert H. ; F 10, George, died; 
F 11, Robert Henderson; F 12, Mary Louisa; F 13, Mary Ann; 
F 14, Hickman Lewis. 

E 13. Capt. Joel, son of Col. Joel Lewis, was born about 1812. 
He read law, but never practiced it; engaged in rearing fine stock 
about Huntsville, Ala. ; was rather eccentric in some things ; was a 
great talker. Once, at a party in Nashville, one of the Mr. Ewings, 
it is said, in order to make a display of his money, lighted a cigar 
with a five-dollar bill in the presence of the crowd; Capt. Joel 
Lewis, in order to surpass him, lighted a cigar with a fifty-dollar 
bill. He commanded a company in the Mexican war, as captain in 
the 2d Regiment of Tennessee Volunteers. He never married; went 
to California, and was teaching agriculture to the Mendocino Indians 
when last heard of. 

E 15. Darthula, daughter of Col. Joel Lewis, was born about 
1816. She married a Mr. Harrison; went to Texas, where she died, 
leaving children, viz. : 

F 1. Miriam; F 2, Anna; F 3, Wm. Knox, etc. 

D 11. James Martin, son of Wm. T. Lewis, Sr., of Nashville, 
Tenn., was born in 1762, in Albemarle county, Va. He was a Rev- 
olutionary soldier and was in the battle of King's Mountain. ( See 
"King's Mountain and its Heroes," on pages 261, 457 and 458.) 
He emigrated with his father and brothers about 1793, from Surry 



110 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

county, N. C. , to Nashville, Tenn. He finally settled in Columbia, 
Maury county, as a merchant, where he died in 1830. He married 
in 1790, Mary Boswell, daughter of Benj. Herndon, of Wilkes 
county, N. C, who was a Revolutionary soldier, and who repre- 
sented Wilkes county in the State Legislature from 1783 to 1786. 
(See Wheeler's History of North Carolina, page 465.) James M. 
Lewis and the most of his family were Presbyterians; his wife was 
a Methodist, and was born in 1770. They had ten children, viz. : 

El. Benjamin Herndon, born 1791; died single in Woodville, 
Miss., in 1835. He was a very talented 3'oung man. 

E 2. William Terrell, Sr., was born in 1792. He finally settled 
in or near Woodville, Wilkinson county, Miss., where he died in 
185-4. He was for many years sherifl' of Wilkinson county; was 
very popular, and much beloved by all who knew him, for his char- 
itable acts and kindness towards the unfortunate sufferers during 
the prevalence of yellow fever and other epidemics. He married 
first, Miss Vii'ginia Elizabeth Marshall, in Woodville, Miss. She 
was born in Bedford county, Tenn. , and was the daughter of John 
and Mary Marshall, and a granddaughter, on her mother's side, of 
Capt. Mat Martin, of Wartrace, Bedford county. His first wife 
died in 1831, leaving two children. In 1839 he married Mamie 
Eliza Davis, as his second wife, by whom he raised only one child. 
His second wife died in 1842, while on a visit to her mother, on Ten- 
sas river, five miles from Trinity, La. Their children were, viz. : 

F 1. Benjamin Herndon, died in childhood. 

F 2. William Terrell, Jr., born in 1829; married Isabella Welch. 

F 3. Mary Eliza, born about 1840; married Frank W. Moore. 

F 2. William Terrell, Jr., who was born in 1829, in Woodville, 
Miss., was raised by his grandmother, Mrs. Mary Clay Marshall, 
and went with her to New Orleans, La., in 1837, where he remained 
until 1844, after which he went to Jackson College, in Maury 
county, Tenn., and then went to school at Gallatin, Tenn., to Mr. 
Wymon, at Rural Academy, after which he went to Fayetteville, 
Lincoln county, Tenn. , and studied under H. A. Dickerson, a grad- 
uate of Yale College, where he remained until 1849, receiving a 
classical education, together with mathematics and the sciences. 

In the fall of 1850 he entered the law school of the Cumberland 
University, at Lebanon, under Chief Justice Nathaniel Green, B. F. 
Ridley, Chancellor of the State, and Abram Caruthers. 

In 1851 he obtained license to practice law, and moved to, and 
settled in, Fayetteville, Tenn., and entered into partnership with 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY, 111 

-James R. Bright. In the fall of 1852 he returned to his native 
town, Woodville, Miss. , and entered into co-partnership with J. D. 
Oildart. In the fall of 1853 he was elected Mayor of Woodville, 
In 1854 he resigned and went to California, via Gray town, Nicara- 
gua, etc., and arrived in San Francisco in 1854. During that year he 
practiced his profession in Tual county, Cal. ; from there he went to, 
a,nd settled in, Valicito, Calaveras county, and practiced law and en- 
gaged in mining until 1857, when he was elected as State Senator, 
to fill the unexpired term of W. B. Norman. In 1861 he was re- 
elected to the State Senate, beating Wm. Higby, In 1868 he moved 
to Angel" s, Calaveras county; engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession and in mining. In 1871 he moved to San Andreas, the 
■county-seat of Calaveras county, where he continued the practice of 
his profession until 1873, when he was elected District Attorney in 
and for Calaveras county, of the 11th Judicial District, by an over- 
whelming majority. 

In 1871 he married Miss Isabella Welch, at Angel's. She was 
born in San Francisco, Cal. They have children, viz. : 

G 1. Farle}", born December 15, 1872, etc. 

F. 3. Mary Eliza Davis, daughter of Wm. T. Lewis, Sr., of 
Woodville, Miss., was born in 1840, and in 1858 married Col. Frank 
W. Moore, of Issequena county, Miss., and died in New Orleans, 
March 19, 1886, while on a visit to the city; was buried in Vicks- 
burg. Miss. She left two children, viz. : 

G 1. Frank W., born 1862. 

G 2. Emmett N., born 1864, Hay's Landing, Issaquena county, 
Miss. 

E 3. Sarah Pines, daughter of James M. Lewis, was born in 
1794, and died in Nashville, Tenn. , in 1844. She first married 
Isaac B. Hardin, by whom she had three children, viz. : 

F 1. William Ferdinand, was born about 1812; resides,a bachelor, 
near Memphis, Tenn. 

F 2. Benjamin Lewis, was born about 1814; married and lives 
near Memphis, Tenn. 

F 3. One child that died in infancy. 

Mr, Hardin died in 1824, after which Sarah P., his widow, mar- 
ried Dr. William McNeil, of Nashville, Tenn., by whom she had no 
children. 

E 4. Fanny, daughter of Jas. M. Lewis, born 1796, and died 
1797. 

E 5. Ann C, daughter of Jas, M. Lewis, born in 1798; married 



112 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

John Hodge in 1814, and died in Carroll county, Miss., in 1848. 
She had six children, viz. : 

F 1. James Lewis, born 1808, and died 1848, unmarried. 

F 2. Joseph, born 1813, and died 1850, unmarried. 

F 3. Mary Euphenia, born 1821 ; married Dr. A. H. Buchanan 
in 1833, and now resides, a widow, at Hot Springs, Ark. Dr. Buch- 
anan was a very distinguished physician, and was a professor in the 
Medical College at Nashville. He died in Greorgia in 1865, leaving 
an only son, viz. : G 1, Thomas Buchanan, who was born about 
1841, and resides with his widowed mother near Hot Springs, 
Ark. 

F 4. Wm. Isaac Hodge, was born March 14, 1820, and died 
January 4, 1864, at Woodville, Miss. When quite a boy he came 
to Woodville, Miss., to his uncle, Wm. T. Lewis, the sheriff of said 
county, he acting as deputy for his uncle for some years. He was 
quite popular among his friends. He did much good during the yel- 
low fever epidemic of 1844, when nearly the whole population of 
the town was swept away by the dreadful scourge. During this 
time he was elected lieutenant-colonel of the United States militia, 
which title he wore till his death. When war was declared against 
Mexico, he volunteered his services and went to Mexico in com- 
pany B., commanded by Capt. D. H. Cooper — Hon. Jeff. Davis as 
colonel of the regiment — and fought under General Zachary Taylor, 
and passed with him to the halls of Montezuma, where Gen. John 
A. Quitman was made President of Mexico. After returning to 
Woodville, Miss., he married, on the 25th day of February, 1848, Miss 
Margaret P. Ellis, a member of the Episcopal church, who was born 
August 19, 1828. He also served in the late Civil war as Lieu- 
tenant and Captain of the " Bingaman Rangers" from Natchez. 
He raised six children, viz. : 

G 1. Thos. E. Hodge, born May 2, 1849; was very tall, with 
light hair, blue eyes and fair complexion. 

G 2. Ann Lewis Hodge, born March 14, 1851, and died 1852. 

G 3. Martha E., born July 25, 1853; is five feet four and one- 
half inches in height, with blue eyes and auburn hair, weighing one 
hundred and thirty pounds, and is a member of the Episcopal church. 
She married, April 13, 1874, James Ernest Peeler, of Warren 
county, Miss., son of Richmond Peeler; he was a cotton planter and 
the originator of the celebrated "Peeler cotton," noted as "long 
staple. ' ' James E. and Martha Peeler had four children, viz. : 

H 1. Clementine Gorden, born January 13, 1875; has blue 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 113 

eyes, light hair and fair complexion, and is a member of the Epis- 
copal church. 

H 2. Jas. Ernest, Jr., born December 25, 1877; blue eyes and 
dark hair, and a member of the Episcopal church. 

H 3. Margaret Ellis, born November 3, 1879; blue eyes, light 
hair and fair complexion, and is a member of the Episcopal church. 

H 4. Richmond, born October 7, 1881; blue eyes and light 
hair. 

Jas. E. Peeler, Sr. , was born May 22, 1851, in Warren county, 
Miss., and died August 3, 1883. He was live feet ten inches in 
height, weighing one hundred aud fifty pounds, and was a graduate 
of the Bryant & Stratton Commercial College, St. Louis, Mo. ; had 
light hair, blue eyes and fair complexion. 

G 4. George Gorden Hodge, daughter of Wm. I. , born May 2, 
1857; had blue eyes, fair complexion, dark hair and weighed one 
hundred and fifteen pounds. She was a member of the Episcopal 
church; died single in 1884, and was in Yicksburg, Miss. 

G 5. Hugh McGehee, born August 19, 1859: died April 17, 1863. 

G 6. 3Iary B., born August 16, 1861; died April 14, 1863, and 
buried at Mt. Vernon, the family burying-ground. -. 

F 5. Robert Thomas Hodge, born 1827; died single in 1S52. 

F 6. Col. Benjamin Lewis Hodge, was born in 1829; married 
Miss Caledonia Cash; had children, viz. : G 1, Arthur G., etc., and 
died at Shreveport, La., in 1864. Col. Benj. L. Hodge was a law- 
yer, residing at Shreveport, La., where he practiced law for several 
years. He was a member of the State Convention of Louisiana 
when the State seceded from the general government, and signed the 
Declaration of Independence. "When the tocsin was sounded for 
war, he was among the first that volunteered their services in behalf 
of the Southern States, and was elected lieutenant of a company or- 
ganized at Shreveport, called the "Shreveport Grays." He soon 
left his company, returned home, raised a regiment, and was elected 
its colonel. 

[ From the Daily Delta, of New Orleans, Xovember 13, 1861.] 

Camp Moore, November 11, 1861. 
Editor Delta: The 19th Regiment of Louisiana Volunteers was or- 
ganized here on last Saturday by the election of the following officers: 
B. L. Hodge, Colonel; J. M. Hollingsworth, Lieutenant-Colonel, and Lou- 
den Butler, Major. 

Col. Hodge is well known as one of the most brilliant men in North 
Louisiana, of fine military acquirements, and every way well qualified to 
command the noble band of men of whom he is the chosen leader. He is 



114 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

a lawyer of distinction, and was a leading member of the State Conven- 
tion that severed the connection between Louisiana and the old Union, and 
gave his hearty support to that measure. 

He was one of the Bell electors in the last campaign, but as soon as 
Lincoln's election was known, gave his voice for the South, and by his 
brilliant talents became at once a leader in the secession movement. 

He was not permitted to remain long in the army, for in 1864 
he was elected a member of the Confederate Congress from Shreve- 
port, La. , which office he held to the day of his death. 

[From the Eastern Clarion, September 20, 1864.] 
DEATH OP B. L. HODGE. 

Hon. B. L. Hodge, member of Congress from Louisiana, died recently 
in Shreveport. He was a talented and able lawyer, standing at the head of 
his profession in Northern Louisiana, and was universally loved and 
respected. 

E 6. Eliza Farrar, daughter of James M. Lewis, was born in 
1802, in Columbia, Tenn. In 1820 she married Dr. Thomas Brown, 
had six children, and died in Columbia in 1844. Dr. Brown was a 
brother of Governor A. V. Brown, of Tennessee. The following are 
the names of their children, viz. : 

r 1. Caledonia, born 1821, married Meredith Poindexter Gentry 
in 1847 (a cousin of Abram Poindexter Maury, of Maury county, 
Tenn.). He was a farmer of Bedford county, Tenn. He was a 
member of Congress from Tennessee in 1839, 1841, 1845, 1847, 
1849. (SeeT. H. Benton's Thirty Years' View.) He was also a 
member of the Confederate Congress, in 1862, from Tennessee. 

[From the Louisville Courier-Journal, November 6, 1866.] 
Hon. Meredith P. Gentry, of Tennessee, is dead. He was a man of dis- 
tinguished ability. As one of the leaders of the old Whig party, he was, 
for many years, an important power in Tennessee, and his fame was 
national. He sustained his first, and perhaps only, political defeat in a 
conflict, a most desperate one, with Andrew Johnson. We do not think he 
ever fully recovered from it." 

The following sketch we clip from the Courier-Journal by ' ' An 

Old Fogy:" 

One of the most prominent and eloquent men who figured in the politics 
of Tennessee for many years was Colonel Meredith P. Gentry. I first met 
him in the Legislature of 1835. He was a frank, outspoken, handsome 
young man. He took but little part in the debates of that session. In 
1837 he was re-elected, and long before the Legislature came to its close he 
had shown himself to be a natural orator. There was not only sweet music 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY, 115 

in his voice, but the most appropriate words in our language flowed from 
his lips without an apparent effort. In 1839 he was elected a Representa- 
tive to Congress, as a Whig, and served four years, declining a re-election 
in 1843. In 1845 he was returned to Congress. During that canvass a 
report was circulated against him in one of the towns of his district that he 
took a drop too much of the ardent. I must give his reply to this charge, 
as it shows the character of the man for boldness: "I have been in the 
habit all my life," said he, "of taking a social glass with my friends, and 
I expect to continue it. Sometimes I take one glass, sometimes two, some- 
times three; and, if you must know the whole truth, fellow-citizens, some- 
times I get most gloriousl}- drunk." That was Gentry all over. He had 
no concealments. I got this reply, in the words I have given, from a 
Democrat who heard it, and whom it had converted into an enthusiastic 
friend. Colonel Gentry was re-elected in 1847, in 1849 and in 1851, the last 
two races without opposition. 

The Whig party received its death blow in 1852 — its Presidential candi- 
date. General Scott, receiving the electoral votes of only four States, Ten- 
nessee, Kentucky, Vermont and Massachusetts. The Know-Nothing party 
soon took its place and carried for awhile everything before it. It was 
overthrown in Tennessee by Andrew Johnson in 1855. He was the Demo- 
cratic candidate for Governor, and Colonel Gentry the candidate of the 
Know-Nothings. 

They had a high old time of it, and the result was the triumph of 
Johnson. E. G. Eastman was then editor of the leading Democratic organ 
of the State. Shortly after the election William G. Brownlow and Colonel 
Matt Martin visited Colonel Gentry at his country home and remained with 
him two or three days. When their horses were saddled, and they were 
about to depart. Colonel Gentry took down a Bible from the book-case and 
said : " I never permit a distinguished divine to honor me with a visit and 
leave without saying prayers for the family and the neighborhood. Brown- 
low, you must pray." They all seated themselves, and after Brownlow had 
read a chapter in the Bible he kneeled down and commenced. It was not 
long before he prayed that the Lord might send beams of grace upon the 
hearts of Andrew Johnson and his man Eastman. "Stop, Brownlow, stop," 
exclaimed Gentry. " If that petition is answered, the plan of salvation will 
be exhausted and the rest of us will be damned." 

In 1860-61 Colonel Gentry's eloquent voice was often heard in behalf of 
the Union. But when the war came he took the side of his section and 
was elected to the Confederate Congress. He died in 1866, aged fiftj'-five 
years. An Old Fogy. 

[From the Courier-Journal, December 5, 1881.] 
M. P. Gentry, of Tennessee, was a member of Congress. He was 
arrested at his home in the fall of 1863, and required to appear before 
General Rousseau, of Nashville, on the first day of January, 1864. That 
night he told me what he had said to the General. As well as I can recol- 
lect his words, they were these : " General Rousseau, the preservation of 
this Union has been the grand idea of my life. I fought nullification as 



116 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

soon as it raised its odious head. I fouglit secession till tlae last day in the- 
evening, but when I saw all my neighbors get on board the secession bout, 
I exclaimed : ' Boys, I will get in and go with you, if you go to Halifax.' "" 

An Old Fogy. 

[From Louisville Journal, October 3, 1866.] 
Hon. Meredith P. Gentry died at half past eight o'clock yesterday morn- 
ing at the residence of a relative, Mrs. Mary Ann Haggett, near this cit}-. 

A. H. Stephens, in his History of the United States, giA'es a 
sketch of Meredith P. Gentry on page 959, at the conclusion of 
which he says: 

This brief tribute is given to the memorj' of one of the truest and 
noblest gentlemen the writer ever met with in his eventful life. No pro- 
founder philanthrojjist, no one more devoted to constitutional liberty ever 
lived in this or any other country than Meredith Poindexter Gentrj-." 

Alexander H. Stephens. 

Washington, D. C, May 17, 1881. 

Meredith P. Gentry was born in Rockingham county, N. C, 
September 15, 1809. His mother was Theodosia Poindexter. His 
father, in 1813, emigrated to Tennessee and settled in Williamson 
county. Before he was twenty-one years of age he was elected 
colonel of the militia in Tennessee. He was elected as a member of 
the Legislature of Tennessee in 1835. He was elected as a member 
of Congress in 1839, 1841, 1843 and in 1845. He first married Miss 
Emily Saunders, February 22, 1837, a granddaughter of John 
Donalson. His second wife was Miss Caledonia, daughter of Dr. 
Brown and niece of Governor A. V. Brown. Caledonia Brown had 
two children by M. P. Gentry and died in Bedford county, Tenn., 
in 1852. The names of her two children are: G 1, Albert, and 
G 2, Charles Gentry. 

F 2. Ann, daughter of Mrs. Eliza and Dr. Thomas Brown, mar- 
ried Alexander Williamson in 1843. They reside at Summerville, 
Tenn., and have children, viz. : G 1, Cordelia; G 2, Mildred; G 3, 
Orlando; G 4, Thomas; G 5, Susan, etc. 

F 3. Cordelia, daughter of Eliza and Dr. Brown, married Dr. 
Watt, of Summerville, Tenn., in 1846. She died childless in Texas 
in 1846, aged twenty years. 

F 4. Hamilton Brown, born 1831, died 1842. 

F 5. Orlando Brown, born 1833, married Josephine Cooper, 
resides at Summerville, Tenn., and has children, viz.: G 1, Albert; 
G 2, Lula, etc. 

F 6. Thomas Brown, born 1835 and died 1840. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 117 

E 7, 8 and 9. Three daughters, triplets, of James M. Lewis, 
born 1803, died nameless. 

E 10. Micajah Green, son of James M. Lewis, was born in 1806, 
resides in Angel's, Calaveras county, Cal. ; married Eliza Jane Shaw 
in 1826, and had six children, viz. : 

F 1. James M., born 1828, died 1829. 

F 2. Benjamin Hugh, born 1830, married in California a Miss 
Mary Isabel in 1860, and has three children, viz. : G 1, Green; G 2, 
Hampton; G 3, Mar}', etc. 

F 3. Mary Orlean, daughter of Micajah G. Lewis, was born 
1835 and died 1853, unmarried. 

F 4. William Hickman, son of Micajah G. Lewis, was born in 
1838, married Rebecca Patterson, of Tennessee, in 1858, and resides 
at Paris, Lamar county, Tex. 

F 5. Amanda, born 1843, married Ben F. Hilliard, of Lamar 
county, Tex. 

F 6. Katharine Green, died in childhood. 



118 - GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



CHAPTEE YI. 

MACKEY FAMILY, RUTHERFORD COUNTY, N. C. 

C 2. Susannah, daughter of David Lewis, by Miss Terrell,, 

his first wife, was born in Hanover county, Va. , about 1726. She 
married Alexander Mackey, and moved from Albemarle county, Ya. , 
to Rutherford county, N. C, before the Revolutionary war, where 
she died, in 1784, from small-pox, on Broad river, a few miles from 
Rutherford ton. Alexander Mackey died in the same county soon 
after the close of the Revolutionary war. They raised six children, 
viz, : 

D 1. John, died a bachelor in Robertson county, Tenn. 

D 2. Susannah, married Rob. Young and died near the Ohio 
river, perhaps in the State of Ohio, or Kentucky. 

D 3. Rebecca, married John Young and died near the Ohio 
river. 

D 4. Mary, married a Mr. Powers and died in Kentucky. 

D 5. David, married Sally Potts and resided at New Madrid, 
New Madrid county. Mo. , where his wife died, leaving two children. 
After the death of his wife he started to move. He placed his two 
little children on a boat and went by land himself in order to carry 
his stock. He was taken sick on the road and died in the Choctaw 
Nation. His children were never heard of afterward. 

D 6. William Lewis Mackey, the youngest, was born in Ruther- 
ford county, N. C, about 1773. 

Elizabeth Ashbrook, whom he married in Rutherford county, N. C.,, 
about the year 1792, was born in 1769 in Rutherford county, N. C. 

Wm. L. Mackey was about six feet in height, of fair complexion, 
with black hair and blue eyes, and weighed about one hundred and 
sixty pounds. After his marriage he remained in Rutherford county 
until after the birth of his two eldest children. In 1795 he emigrated 
to Tennessee through the wilderness without a road or guide, in 
company with one or two other families, and settled in Christian 
county. From thence he moved to Robertson county, then to Smith, 
then to Bedford, and finally settled in Maury county, where he died 
in 1862 or 1863. He worked a short time at Tuscumbia, Ala., and 
helped to put up the first log-cabin that was built at that now 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 119 

flourishing city. While engaged in putting up this log-cabin, above 
mentioned, he cut his knee with an ax. 

After his death the following obituary notice was published at 
Columbia, Tenn. : 

William Lewis Mackey, the subject of this obituary, was born in 
Rutherford county, N. C, near what is called "the foot of the mountain," 
in 1773. 

Death is at all times fearful to behold, inVhatever form he may appear, 
yet he maj- be dissolved of many terrors by a holy, consistent life. Such 
was the case with the present subject. He was a worthj- citizen, upright 
in all his dealings — in a word, an honest man, the "noblest work of God." 
Though not a member of the church, he entertained no fears of a hereafter, 
but spoke often, calmly and with resignation, of his departure. Having 
lived the life of a good man, the king of terror was disarmed, and he could 
look with an eye of faith to the haven of eternal rest, where, free from the 
trials of earth, the "weary find rest and the wicked cease to trouble." It is 
a source of unmistakable gratification to his surviving friends to feel, after 
having fought the battles of life, he is at rest, and that if faithful they 
maj' one day meet the kind friend on the banks of everlasting deliverance, 
in the pure realm where parting is unknown. Maj* each member of his 
family be constrained to follow in his footsteps, imitate his worthy example 
in all things, emulate his noble virtues, and, when called hence, may no 
fears arise, no lowering clouds obscure the horizon, but with the armor of 
faith sustain by hope the peaceful anchor of the soul. Maj' they launch 
their barks on the tempestuous waves, feeling sure of safely anchoring at 
home. 

OBITUARY OF MRS. ELIZABETH MACKEY. 

DIED, 

In Maurj' county, Tenn., on the 17th of January, Mrs. Elizabeth Mackey, 
wife of William L. and mother of Alexander Mackey, Jr., in the eighty- 
seventh year of her age. The deceased was a native of North Carolina, 
where she embraced the Christian religion and connected herself with the 
Baptist church, in the faith of which she died, confidently anticipating 
a blissful immortality bej'ond the grave. A Friend. 

William L. Mackey and his wife, Elizabeth Ashbrook, had nine 
children, but raised only eight, viz. : 

E 1. Rebecca Mackey, born 1793; married Elisha Smith. 

E 2. Sarah Mackey, born 1795; married Joel Coffey. 

E 3. Alexander Mackey, born 1797; married Matilda Alderson. 

E 4. Margaret Mackey, born 1799; married Joseph Clark. 

E 5. Joel Lewis Mackey, born 1801 ; married Mary Fonville. 

E 6. Eleanor Mackey, born 1803; married Moland Eason. 

E 7. William Terrell, born 1808; died single in 1833. 



120 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

E 8. Elizabeth, born 1805; married Wm. Terrell; and 

E 9. Moses Ashbrook, born 1814, and died in 1824. 

E 1. Rebecca, the eldest child of Wm. L. Mackey, was born in 
Rutherford county, N. C, and married, in Tennessee, about the 
year 1810, to Lieutenant Elisha Smith. Mr. Smith was a lieutenant 
in a company belonging to General Carroll's brigade in the War of 
1812, and was in the battles of the 23d of December and the 8th of 
January at New Orleans, La., when Packenham was so signally 
defeated, but commanded, as a captain, during the battles of New 
Orleans. Captain Smith died near Abbeville, in La Fayette count}', 
Miss., in 1852, aged sixty-three years. Mrs. Rebecca Smith, his 
wife, died in the same county, near Abbeville, in 1865. She was 
an exemplary member of the Baptist church. Mrs. Rebecca Smith 
raised nine children, viz. : 

F 1. Elizabeth, born in 1811; married J. L. Lee. 

F 2. Captain Elija Williams, born in 1813, 

F 3. Sarah Louisa, born in 1815; married J. M. Gooch. 

F 4. Louisa Ann Caroline, born in 1817; married Rob. Moore 
and Wm. Goodwin. 

F 5. Nancy Cook, born in 1819; married Wm. Alexander. 

F 6. Mary Sophronia, born in 1826. 

F 7. Ellen Clorinda, born in 1828. 

F 8. William Anderson, born in 1831; and 

F 9. Joel Lewis, born 1834, and died in 1848. 

F 1. Elizabeth, daughter of Elisha and Rebecca Smith, married 
J. L. Lee; they reside in La Fayette county, Miss., and have eleven 
children, viz. : 

G 1. Sarah Louisa, born 1831; married H. W. Goodwin in 1852. 
They are Methodists, and Mr. Goodwin is a brick-mason by trade. 

G 2. James Madison Lee, born 1833. 

G 3. Mary Elizabeth Lee, born 1834. 

G 4. Elisha Smith Lee, born 1836. 

G 5. Rebecca Jane Lee, born 1838. 

G 6. Sophronia Ann Lee, born 1838, and married Robert Nix in 
1859. 

G 7. Mathias Lee, born 1839. 

G 8. Mary Caroline Lee, born 1841. 

G 9. Rebecca Clorinda Lee, born 1843. 

G 10. Margaret M. Lee, born 1845, and 

G 11. John Francis Lee, born 1847. 

F 2. Capt. Elijah William Smith, was born in 1813. He was a 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 121 

man of high standing and great respectability; was sheriff of 
La Fayette county, Miss. He opposed the secession of the Southern 
States in 1861 which involved the country in a war; but after his 
State seceded he resolved to unite his destiny with her and fight for 
his home, regardless of the consequences. When war was declared, 
he turned out as a volunteer; made up a company, and was elected 
its captain. He went into the service; did good fighting until he 
was taken sick near Bardstown, Ky. , where he died in 1862. He 
was a member of the Baptist church, and a true Christian. He left 
five children, whose names are as follows: 

G 1. James Burt, born 1846; G 2, Wm. Edward, born 1848; G 3, 
3Iary Rebecca, born 1850; G 4, Louisa A., born 1853, died 1859, 
and G 5, John p]lisha, born 1856. 

F 3. Sarah Louisa, daughter of Mrs. Rebecca Smith, was born 
in 1815. She married in 1835, J. M. Gooch, a farmer. She is a 
member of the Baptist church. The names of her children are as 
follows : 

G 1. Julia Ann, born 1836; G 2, Mary Jane, born 1838; G 3, 
Thos. Jefferson, born 1840; G 4, Wm. Daniel, born 1842; G 5, 
James Elijah, born 1845; G 6, Leah Rebecca, born 1850; G 7, Joseph 
Franklin, born 1856, etc. 

F 4. Louisa Ann Caroline, daughter of Mrs. Rebecca Smith, was 
born in 1817. She was twice married; first to Robert Moore; 
secondly to Wm. Goodwin, a mechanic. She is now a widow with 
five children. Their names are as follows : 

G 1. Rob. Goodwin; G 2, Martin; G 3, Elisha Mills; G4, George 
Alexander, and G 5, Mary. 

F 5. Nancy Cook, daughter of Mrs. Rebecca Smith, was born in 
1819. In 1839 she married Wm. Alexander, had six children, and 
died in 1852. The names of her children are as follows: 

G 1. Robert; G 2, John; G 3, Mary Rebecca; G 4, Malinda; 
G 5, Thomas; G 6 (unknown). 

F 6. Mary Sophronia, daughter of Mrs. Rebecca Smith, was 
born 1826. In 1841 she married J. W. C. Marberry, a farmer. So- 
phronia is a member of the Baptist church. The names of her chil- 
dren are: 

G 1. James Madison, born 1842; G 2, Emaline, born 1843; G 3, 
John H., born 1846; G 4, Rebecca Caroline, born 1848; G 5, William 
D., born 1850; G 6, Elijah M., born 1852; G 7, Mason Caroline, born 
1854; G 8, Semiramis T., born 1858. 

F 7. Ellen Clorinda, daughter of Mrs. Rebecca Smith, was born 



122 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

1828. In 1847 she married Stephen D. Hunter, a farmer. Thej" 
have the following named children : 

G 1. Joseph M., born in 1848; G 2, Casper C, born 1850; G 3, 
William, born 1852; G 4, John La Fayette, born 1854; G 5, Mary 
M., born 1856; G 6, Rebecca Ellen, born 1859. 

F 8. William Anderson, son of Mrs. Rebecca Smith, was born 
in 1831, and married in 1866, Miss Stephens. 

F 9. Joel Lewis, son of Mrs. Rebecca Smith, was born in 1834, 
and died in 1848. The family resides in La Faj^ette county, Miss. 

E 2. Sarah Mackey, daughter of Wm. L. Mackey, was born in 
Rutherford county, N. C, in 1795. She married Joel Coffey, had 
three children, and died in Missouri. The names of her children are 
as follows: F 1, William; F 2, Chesley, and F 3, Derrindia. 

After the death of Mrs. Sarah Coffey and her three children, Mr. 
Coffey moved to Oregon. 

E 3. Alexander, son of Wm. Lewis Mackey, was born in Ten- 
nessee, in 1797. He resides near Columbia, Maury county, Tenn. , 
and in point of truth, integrity and honor, he ranks among the first 
men of the county. He has been sheriff of Maury county; member 
of the Board of Examiners of the Union Branch Bank, at Colum- 
bia, and also President of said bank. In 1830 he married Matilda 
Alderson, who died during the Confederate war, leaving eight chil- 
dren, viz. : 

F 1. Ann Eliza, born 1831; F 2, Sarah Francis, born 1834; F 3, 
Martha Jane, born 1836; F 4, Mary Louisa, born 1838; F 5, John 
Alderson, born 1840; F 6, Jas. Tazewell, born 1842; F 7, Wm. 
Terrell, born 1844, and F 8, Alexander Bacon, born 1845. 

F 1. Ann Eliza, daughter of Alexander Mackey, was born in 
Columbia, Tenn., in 1831, and was educated at the Female Institute 
of Columbia, Tenn., which is her post-oflice. She is a member of 
the Baptist church. In 1848 she married Grandison Greenville 
Leftwich, by whom she had five children, viz. : 

G 1. Virginia Alice, born 1849. She has light hair, blue e3'es 
and fair complexion. 

G. 2. Thomas Alexander, was born in 1853. He has light hair, 
blue eyes and fair complexion. 

G 3. James Wickliff, born 1854, and died the same year. 

G 4. William Grandison, born 1856. 

G 5. Sarah Matilda, born 1857, and died 1858. 

Mr. G. G. Leftwich died in Virginia, during the Confederate 
war, as a soldier. In 1865, Ann Eliza, his widow, married John A., 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 123 

Grubb. Mr. Grubb is a small man with dark hair and blue eyes. 
He is a kind husband and one of the best of men. They reside near 
Columbia, Tenn. By this last marriage Ann Eliza has children, viz. : 

G 6. Susan Ann Grubb, born 1867, etc. 

F 2. Sarah Francis, daughter of Alexander Mackey, was born in 
Maury county, Tenn., in 1833, and died in 1835. 

F 3. Martha Jane Mackey, was born in 1836, and in 1848 she 
married George D. Colquitt, Columbia, Tenn. 

F -1. Mary Louisa Mackey, was born in 1838. She was educated 
at the Female Institute, Columbia, Tenn. 

The very able and pathetic letter of condolence she wrote to her 
parents upon the death of her two brothers during the Confederate 
war, and which was published in Columbia, Tenn., gave unmistakable 
evidence that she is a woman of no ordinary intellect. 

In 1864 she married James R. Hodge, and resides near Columbia, 
Tenn. The}' have children as follows; 

G 1. Italy Gazelle, born 1866; G 2, George Darden, born 1867, 
etc. 

F 5. John Alderson Macke}-, was born in 1840. He was a soldier 
in the Confederate war. In order to give an accurate account of 
his services during said war, we here give an extract from a letter 
written by himself, as follows: 

. Wartrace Depot, Bedford Co., Tenn., Sept. 26, 1867. 

I joined the Southern Army on the 27th of April, 1861, as a private in 
Company B, 2d Tennessee Regiment. After the regiment went to Nashville, 
Tenn., I was appointed First Corporal of Companj- B. The regiment was 
then ordered to Virginia. "We reached Virginia and were put on duty at 
Fredericksburg the 2d of May. We were then marched from camp to 
camp, along the railroad, from Fredericksburg to Aquia creek, until we 
were ordered to Manassas Junction. We were in the battle of Manassas on 
the 21st of July, but no one hurt in the regiment. We were then ordered 
back to Dumfries, there to build batteries and blockade the Potomac river, 
which we did. Company B, of the 2d Tennessee Regiment, was then detailed 
to take charge of three cannons. We staid in the Navy Department from 
September 24, 1861, till February 14, 1862. The morning of February 14, 
1862, we left Dumfries, Va., or the battery at Ship Point, Va., for Ten- 
nessee, but before we reached Tennessee the forces at Fort Donelson were 
surrendered and the Federal forces had possession of this country, and we 
were then ordered to Corinth, Miss., to reorganize, which we did, and I was 
then elected second lieutenant of the same companj-, B, 2d Tennessee. We 
then were ordered to Shiloh, where we were engaged in battle on Sunday 
and Monday, the 6th and 7th of April, 1862. About 1 o'clock Monday, 
I received a slight wound in the calf of the right leg. We then returned to 



124 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Corinth to recruit. We camped tliere awliile, when Captain Wiley George, 
of Companj' B, was taken sick, and I was called upon to take command, 
which I did. I commanded the company in the battle of Shillon's Hill, 
but no one was hurt. We were then ordered to evacuate Corinth and 
march to Tupelo, Miss., where Captain George resigned and I was elected 
Captain on July 9, 1862, but was ordered from there to Kentucky before 
I received my commission. When we arrived at Knoxville, Tenn., I was 
ordered to take charge of the company as captain ; I did so, and then 
received my commission on the march from Knoxville to Cumberland Gap. 
We marched on the enemy at Barboursville, Ky., and drove them off. We 
then followed on to Richmond, Ky., where we had a severe battle, in which 
our Colonel was killed. I was then called on to command the regiment, 
which 1 did, and while leading the charge through the graveyard at Rich- 
mond, Ky., I received a flesh wound in the left thigh, but did not stop for 
it. We killed and captured most of their army. We then went to Perry- 
ville, Ky., where we had a severe battle, but the Confederate States Army 
had to retreat. I acted as major of the regiment from November 1, 1862, 
until February, 1863. I and the Brigadier-General disagreeing, I off'ered 
my resignation and went home, where I fell into the hands of the Federals 
and was imprisoned. At length I was paroled and remained at home till 
February 22, 1866, when I was married to Miss Mary E. Alley, daughter of 
A. R. Alley, of Bedford county, Tenn. 

John Alderson Mackey resides at Wartrace, Bedford county, 
Tenn., and is engaged in merchandising. He has children; his 
oldest daughter was born in July, 1867. 

F 6. Lieutenant James Taswell, son of Alexander Mackey, was 
born in Maury county, Tenn., in 1842. He was one of the bright 
stars of Tennessee. 

During the Confederate war he espoused the cause of the South 
and sacrificed his life in her defense. He was twice captured, once 
at Fort Donelson and once at or near his home. He was at first a 
prisoner at Camp Douglas, near Chicago, 111., and lastly at Fort 
Delaware, where he died with small-pox in 1865. He passed through 
many trials, but bore them with Christian fortitude and died the 
death of the righteous. He was lieutenant in Company E, 48th 
Regiment of Tennessee Infantry. 

It has been said "death loves a shining mark," and in no previous 
instance, within the recollection of the writer of this feeble tribute of 
respect to departed worth, have the words of the proverb come upon the 
mifid with such impressive force ; never has their truthfulness been so 
strikingly exemplified. It was our fortune to have been associated with 
the subject of this notice in various relations in life — as his teacher, his 
comrade in the late unhappy struggle, his messmate in the privations and 
sufferings of a Northern military prison, as his companion and friend ; of 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 125 

course we knew him \vv\\. Every act of his life, every inclination of his 
mind, during the long years of our association, was entirely known to us, 
for his heart was free from deceit and his tongue knew no guile, and we 
only say what all who knew him attest, that never have we known one in 
whom were united so many good qualities and who gave no offense to any 
by the manifestation of even those trivial errors which seem to be insepa- 
rable from human character. As a student he was remarkable for his 
assiduous attention to study, rapid acquisition of knowledge, gentleness of 
disposition toward his fellow students and manly politeness toward all 
with whom he associated. He was never known to offend, and in the wide 
circle of his acquaintance he was beloved by all. As a soldier he was brave 
and humane; conscious of the justice of his cause, he volunteered early in 
the struggle and maintained his integrity faithfully to the end of his earthly 
pilgrimage. In the trials incident to the life of a soldier he exhibited in 
such a light all those excellent qualities which so endeared him to his 
friends and acquaintances at home that no complainings or murmurings 
were ever heard against him, and though others might err, it seemed to 
have been left for him alone to pass through the terrible ordeal unscathed, 
for in all the army he had no enemy — all were his friends. Modest and 
unassuming in his deportment, retired in his habits of life, he seemed to 
avoid observation, and even in the bustle of camp and when surrounded by 
the inconveniences of a military prison he was actively engaged in study, 
preparing himself for the duties which should devolve upon him when the 
struggle for liberty should have ended. But there is another point in his 
character far more important than any to which we have here alluded and 
in which he shone yet more conspicuously. This was his reverence for the 
religion of the Saviour. This reverence was manifested not only by the 
observing of all the outward forms of Christianity, but he had obeyed the 
command of Him who said: " My son, give me thy heart." He was a Chris- 
tian upon the merits of the Redeemer's righteousness ; he had trusted all 
when in health, and in the passage through the valley and shadow of death 
He did not forsake him. Prompt in the discharge of all his Christian 
duties, the value of the souls of others weighed heavily upon his mind, and 
when the messenger came to call him hence he was preparing for the min- 
istry. We were not permitted to be with him in his last hours upon 
earth, but we have the comforting assurance of faith in the promise of the 
Redeemer that "him who cometh unto me I will in no wise cast out." He 
lived the life, and hence we know that he died the death, of the righteous. 
We mourn the loss of one so young, so gifted, so lovely, and many a tear 
has coursed our cheeks as some incident would recall to our mind recollec- 
tions of our departed friend ; but we know that our loss is his eternal gain. 
He has entered upon the enjoyment of that "rest that remaineth for the 
people of God," and now realizes the hopes which animated him while 
suffering in this world. In the blessed land of which he is now a citizen 
there are no wars or fightings ; no sickness, no pain, no death ; but all is 
joy, happiness, ineffable bliss, and "there God shall wipe away all tears 
from our eyes." Our heartfelt sympathies are with the friends of the 
deceased, and it affords us a sad but soothing pleasure to mingle our tears 



126 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

with theirs. Let us revere his memory, emulate his virtues, and so live 
in the hour of our dissolution we may — 

" Sustained and soothed 
By an unfaltering trust, approach the grave 
Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch 
About him and lies down to pleasant dreams." 

Written by his comrade, belonging to the same regiment and company, 

John D. McGill. 

Officeks' Barracks, Fort Delaware, February 14, 1865. 
Mrs. Alexander Mackey : 

My Dear Madam: It is my duty as Corresponding Secretary of the 
Christian Association to send you the enclosed copj' of the preamble and 
resolutions passed by the Christian Association. Could human sympathy 
heal the wounded heart or remove the pang caused by the death of those 
we love, you would not mourn the loss of jour noble Christian son ; but, my 
dear madam, we must look for consolation and comfort in this hour of trial 
to a higher Power ; if we trust Him implicitly and recognize His all-pow- 
erful hand in our afflictions, all will be well. I can assure you, madam, that 
death had no terror for your son ; he died as he had lived — a true, consistent 
Christian, and we feel that he has gained that eternal life promised to those 
who put their trust in the Lord. 1 am, madam, very truly, etc., 

John Law, Adjutant 38<A Georgia Regiment. 

Confederate States Christian Association, ) 
Fort Delaware, Del., February 3d, 1865. j 

PREAMBLE. 

Whereas, Our Heavenly Father has seen fit in his wisdom and prov- 
idence to remove from our midst, by death, our fellow-prisoner and brother, 
James Taswell Mackey, of Columbia, Tenn., who died at the hospital on 
this island, January 20, 1865; therefore. 

Resolved, first : That while we bow with meek submission to the afflict- 
ing hand of Providence in taking from us our brother in the bloom of man- 
hood and usefulness, we mourn the irreparable loss of an energetic and 
faithful member of our Association, a true and gallant soldier of our 
army, a genial companion and a Christian who possessed, in an eminent 
degree, the grace which characterizes the disciples of our Lord and Master. 

Resolved, second: That we tender to his bereaved parents, brothers and 
sisters, the deepest sympathies of our hearts in this, their sore affliction, 
and commend them to the guidance and protection of that God who doeth 
all things for our good, after the counsel of His own wisdom and abundant 
mercy. 

Resolved, third : That this preamble and resolutions be placed upon the 
records of this Association, and that the Corresponding Secretary be in- 
structed to forward a copy of the same to the family of our deceased 
brother. Respectfully submitted. 

Lieutenant Bullitt, "j 
Lieutenant Southgate, V Committee. 
Lieutenant Holmes. J 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 127 

LINES INSCRIBED TO THE MEMORY OP LIEUTENANT JAMES T. MACKEY. 
They tell me that thy spirit pure hath flown, 

From its feeble tenement of clay. 
Up to its native Heaven, where waits thy crown 

That thou shall wear throughout the eternal day. 
The heart is sad and fain would summon back 

The eternal past that made thee dear to all; 
And yet, 'twere wrong thy peaceful sleep to break, 

Prom Heaven to earth th' enraptured soul to call. 
Again 'tis sad that here no mother's love 

Thy dying cares did soothe: thy burden share; 
No kindly sister's hand thy brow to smooth. 

To kiss thy fading cheek, to dry thy tear. 
'Tis true that flowers which yield a sweet perfume 

Are first to wither; first to droop and die. 
'TIs true that hearts which with rare virtues bloom, 

Are apt to bt the first from earth to fly. 
Sweet be thy silent rest beneath the clod. 

Thy worth on marble ne'er will be engraven; 
Yet faith and love have borne thy soul to God, 

Where He rewards His saints by crowns in Heaven. 

Lieut. C. C. Turner, 
Company I, Wi Rcgt. 8. C. Infantry, Fort Prince, Spartanburg District, S, C. 
■Composed whilt at Port Delaware military prison. 

F 7. William Terrell Mackey, son of Alex, was born in Maury 
county, Tenn., in 1844. He was a Confederate soldier and died in 
the army, one month after he entered it. The following obituary 
was published after his death: 

OBITUARY. 

Died, at the Blind Asyhim Hospital, in Jackson, Miss., December 12, 
1862, William Terrell Mackey, a member of Company C, of the 48th Reg- 
iment, Tennessee Volunteers, aged eighteen years, ten months and thirteen 
days. 

Another has been added to the long list of those who have sacrificed 
their lives upon the altar of their country's liberty! Another brave soldier 
*' sleeps the sleep that knows no waking!" That "death loves a shining 
mark," was fully exemplified in the loss of this gallant young soldier. 

Amiable in his disposition, gentle in his manners, he was the idol of 
doting parents; a kind and devoted brother, a true and trusting friend. 
In his last illness he was kindly cared for, and though summoned to meet 
death far from home and kindred, kind hands ministered to his wants and 
smoothed the pillow of the dying comrade. Fond hearts in the home he 
loved so well will lament hih early decease; his comrades mourn the loss of 
one so dear to them, but afl'ection's voice can not recall the absent brother 
and son; the anguish of friends can not restore his much-loved form; he 
sleeps " in the narrow house appointed for all living." We cherish his mem- 
ory and will emulate his many virtues. May our loss be his eternal gain! 
May the green sod of his much-loved South press lightly on his manly 
form! I. D. M. 

A member of his company. 



128 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

F 8. Alexander Bacon, son of Alexander Mackey, was born in- 
Maury county, Tenn. 

E 4. Margaret, daughter of Wm. Lewis Mackey, was born in 
Christian county, Tenn., in 1799, and was married in Mauiy county, 
in 1826, to Joseph Clark. Her weight is about one hundred and 
fifty pounds, with dark brown hair, hazel eyes and fair complexion. 
Mr. Clark was born in 1802, and died in 1857. His weight was 
about one hundred and thirty pounds, with dark hair and blue eyes. 
They were both exemplary members of the church. She is now 
(1867) a widow, near Somerville, Fayette county, Tenn. They 
raised six children, viz. : 

F 1. Amanda Elizabeth, born in 1827. Her height is five feet 
eight inches ; weighs one hundred and fifty pounds, with dark hair 
and hazel eyes. 

James R. Thomas, was born in 1814. His height is six feet; 
weighs one hundred and sixty-five pounds, with blue eyes and 
auburn hair. In 1863, Amanda E. Clark and James R. Thomas 
were married. They reside in Haywood county, Tenn. Their post- 
office is Danville, Tenn. They have children, viz. : 

G 1. William Wynn, born 1864. 

Gr 2. Ann Cornelia, born 1865, etc. 

F 2. Mary Lewis, daughter of Mrs. Margaret Clark, was born in 
1829. Her height is five feet; weighs one hundred and twelve 
pounds, with hazel eyes and auburn hair. 

F 5. William Mackey Clark, was born in 1831. His height was 
five feet eight inches ; weighs one hundred and fifty pounds, with 
auburn hair, hazel eyes and dark complexion. He was murdered in 
Memphis, Tenn., during the Confederate war, for his money. 

F 4. Caroline Clark, was born in 1834. Her height is five feet 
six inches; weighs one hundred and thirtj'-nine pounds, with 
hazel eyes, black hair and dark complexion. 

F 5. Calvin Clark, was born in 1837. His height is five feet 
eleven inches; weighs one hundred and sixty-three pounds; hazel 
eyes, brown hair and dark complexion. 

F 6. Nancy Jane Clark, was born in 1839. Her height is five 
feet eight inches, weighs one hundred and forty-four pounds, with 
hazel eyes, brown hair and fair complexion. The Clark family are 
all farmers. 

E 5. Joel Lewis Mackey, son of Wm. Lewis Macke}', was born 
in 1801. In 1823 he married Mary Fonville, in Maury county, Ten- 
nessee. He is a blacksmith by trade and resides in Hunt county, 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 129 

Tex., but his P. 0. is Black Jack Grove, Hopkins count}', Tex. His 
wife died in 1858, aged fifty-four years. She was from Craven 
county, N. C, and was, perhaps, a daughter of Lewis Fonville, who 
represented that county in the State Legislature. ( See Wheeler's 
History of North Carolina. ) She had a brother by the name of 
Lewis J. Fonville, who was, for many years, Tax Assessor of Win- 
ston county, Miss. , and who was also Tax xlssessor of Holmes county. 
Miss., where he died about 1865. 

Joel L. Macke}' raised seven children, viz. : 

F 1. Elizabeth, born 1824, married William Landingham in 
1848. They live at Doneltou, Hunt county, Tex., and have 
children, viz. : 

G 1. Marshall Ney; G 2, Mary Ann; G 3, William Wallace; 
G 4, Horatio. 

F 2. Elisha Alexander, son of Joel L. Mackey, was born in 
1825, and was a school-teacher by profession. In 1854 he married 
Frances A. Sheppard, and died in Hunt county, Tex., in 1879, and 
had children, viz. : 

G 1. Mary Frances; G 2, Geneva; G 3, Doke Alexander, etc. 

F 3. Lewis Terrell Mackey, son of Joel L., was born in 1828. In 
1851 he married Jane Beasley, and died in Upshur county, Tex., in 
1868. He has the following-named children: 

G 1. James Lewis; G 2, Charles Blake; G 3, Amanda W. ; G 4, 
Mary; G 5, John, etc. 

F 4. Mary Eveline Mackey, daughter of Joel L. , was born in 
1830. In 1848 she married William Barnes, and resides near Ran- 
dall, Cleveland county. Ark. They have children, viz. : G 1, Mary 
Jane, etc. 

F 5. Rebecca Macke}', daughter of Joel L., was born in 1835, 
and in 1858 she married Riley Philips. Her P. 0. is Glade water, 
Gregg county. Ark. She has children, viz. : 

G 1. William Marshall, etc. 

F 6. Wm. Doke Mackey, was born in 1837, in Upshur county, 
Tex. 

F 7. John Blake, was born 1840, and died 1858. 

E 6. Eleanor, daughter of Wm. L. Mackey, was born in 1803. 
She is a member of the Baptist church. She married Moland 
Eason, had two children and now resides, a widow, near Spring 
Grove, Maury county, Tenn. The names of her two children are : 
F 1, Henry, and F 2, Emeline. 

F 1. Henry Eason, was a very tall man, with black hair and 
9 



130 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

eyes. He married Sarah Davis, was a Confederate soldier and died 
in a hospital in Mississippi during the war. His wife died in 1865. 
They had two children, viz. : 

Gr 1. Ann Eliza, born 1862 and died in 1863. 

G- 2. William S., born 1862 and died 1863. 

E 7. Elizabeth Mackey, daughter of Wm. L., was born in 1805 
and married William Terrell, and resides, a widow, near Yorkville, 
Gribson county, Tenn. Wm. Terrell, her husband, died in 1865. 
They had four children, viz. : 

F 1. Joel Jeremiah, died 1865. 

F 2. George Jackson, married Penelope Gregory and has chil- 
dren, viz. : G 1, James Thomas, etc. 

F 3. Martha Elizabeth Terrell, and F 4, Judy Ann Terrell, etc. 

E 8. William Terrell, son of Wm. L. Mackey, was born in 1808, 
and died single in 1833, 

E 9. Moses Ashbrook Mackey, son of Wm. L., was born in 1814, 
and died about the year 1824. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 131 



CHAPTEE YTI. 

HICKMAN FAMILY, OF CLARK COUNTY, KY. 

C 3. Hannah, daughter of David Lewis, Sr., of Albemarle 
county, Va., by his first wife, Miss Terrell, was born in Han- 
over county, Va. , in 1722. In 1744 she married James Hickman, 
of Culpeper county, Va., where they resided until the year 1784, 
when they moved to what is now Clark county, Ky. James Hick- 
man was born in 1724 and died in Clark county, Ky., in 1816. Han- 
nah, his wife, died in the same count}' in 1822, lacking about four 
months of being one hundred years old. She was a pious member 
of the Baptist church. 

Issue of Hannah Lewis and James Hickman: 

D 1. Susannah, born 1745; married James Browning. 

D 2. David, born 1749; married Clara McClauahan. 

D 3. Anna, born 1754; married Stephen Holladay. 

D 4. Rev. Henry, born 1755; married Phebe Eastham. 

D 5. Eleanor, born 1756; married Joseph Hill. 

D 6. General Richard, born 1757; married Lydia Calloway. 

D 7. James, born 1760; married Elizabeth Bryan. 

D 8. Joel, born 1761 ; married Frances G. Wilson, and 

D 9. Hannah, born 1765; married George Hill. 

D 1. Susannah Hickman, who was born in 1745 in Culpeper 
county, Va. , married Oames Browning. She died near Haviland- 
ville, in Harrison county, Ky. , leaving five children, viz.: E 1, 

Caleb, married Anna , and died in Pendleton county, Ky., 

leaving posterity, viz.: F 1, Nancy; F 2, Sallie; F 3, James; F 4, 
Caleb, etc. 

E 2. Mar}-, daughter of James Browning, married Taliaferro 
Browning and died in Pendleton county, Ky. 

E 3. Colonel James, son of James Browning, married Jane 
Morrow. 

E 4. Micajah, son of James Browning, married Sarah Brown. 

E 5. Ann, daughter of James Browning, married Mr. — Overall, 
and resided near Cynthiana, Harrison county, Ky. 

E 3. Colonel James Browning, was born October 2, 1768. Jane 
Morrow, his wife, was born January 4, 1778. They were married 



132 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

about 1795 and settled in Clark count}', Ky. , on the farm now occu- 
pied by their son, Edwin C, and where they both resided to the 
time of their respective deaths, which occurred, the former, on Jul}' 
7, 1825, and the latter, June 4, 1864. Mrs. Jane Browning's par- 
ents moved from Virginia to Kentucky about 1775. Her father was 
James Morrow and her mother, Elizabeth Frame. 

Issue of Colonel James Browning and his wife, Jane Morrow: 

F 1. Elizabeth, born March 1, 1796; married James Grimes. 

F 2. Hickman L., born November 9, 1798; died young. 

F 3. Mary L., born October 22, 1800; married Dandridge Hol- 
laday in 1826. 

F 4. Lucinda B. , born June 22, 1803; married John Headley, 
October 7, 1828, and resides near Lexington, Fayette county, Ky. 

F 5. Matilda, born September 27, 1805; died young. 

F 6. Franklin M., born June 11, 1808; married Cynthiana 
Grimes. 

F 7. James B., born August 17, 1811; married Christina Fonda. 

F 8. Wm. Perry, born October 13, 1813; married Emeline Arm- 
strong. 

F 9. Dr. Milton A., born April 13, 1816; married Mary J. Starr, 
July 2, 1851; resides near Laomi, Sangamon county. 111. 

F 10. Edwin C, born April 24, 1819; married Lucy Blaydes, 
November 8, 1842, and resides at the old homestead of his father, in 
Clark county, Ky. 

F 11. Martha J., born November 11, 1822; married Fauntleroy 
Jones, of Clark county, Ky., in 1841. P. 0., Jones' Nursery. 

Issue of F 4, Lucinda E. Browning and John Headley: 

G 1. James B., married Mary Thomas; had one child — Julia P. 
Headley. 

G 2. John M. ; G 3, Charlton, killed at Hartsville, Tenn. ; be- 
longed to the 8th Kentucky Cavalry — Col. Clark's Kegiment — John 
Morgan's command, C. S. A. 

Issue of F 6, Franklin M. Browning and Cynthia Grimes: 

G 1. Mary A., married Cyrus Blackburn, Havilandville, Har- 
rison county, Ky. 

G 2. Nancy J., married Wm. Parker Morgan, Pendleton 
county, Ky. 

G 3. Lucinda, married Jacob Hall, Havilandville, Ky. 

G 4. Sallie, married N. B. Aulick, Havilandville, Ky. 

G 5. James, married Hester King, Cynthiana, Harrison county, 
Ky. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY, 133 

Gr 6. William, married Addle Blackburn, Havilandville, Ky. 

G 7. Thomas, married Hannah Echle, Knoxville, Pendleton 
county, Ky. 

G 8. Edwin B. , Havilandville, Ky. 

G 9. David P., an artist, Havilandville, Ky. 

Issue of F 7, Jas. B. Browning and Christina Fonda: 

G 1. Jane; G 2, Alice; G 3, Jimmie, and G 4, Gertrude. 

Issue of F 8, Wm. Perry Browning and Emeline Armstrong: 

G 1. Anna, married Mr. Butler; G 2, Bettie; G 3, Charlotte. 

Issue of F 10, Edwin C. Browning and Lucy Blaydes: 

G 1. Lizzie B., married Jacob Embry. 

G 2. James B., married Anna Capps, Athens, Ky. 

G 3. Blaydes; G 4, Woodson; G 5, Perry, married Miss Dixie 
Woodford, Athens, Ky. ; G 6, Edwin; G 7, Edna; G 8, Willie, and 
G 9, Lucy C. Browning. 

Issue of G 1, Lizzie B. and Jacob Embry: 

H 1. Hugh; H 2, Lula, and H 3, Lizzie Embry. 

Issue of G 2, James Browning and Anna Capps: 

H 1. Charlie; H 2, Ollie, and H 3, Jimmie Browning. 

Issue of F 11, Martha J. Browning and Fauntleroy Jones, of 
Clark county, Ky. : 

G 1. Mary, married John W. Moore, a farmer, and has one 
child: H 1. Mattie. 

G 2. Dr. Francis Jones, Pine Grove, Clark county, Ky. 

G 3. Willie, died; G 4, Judge Lewis H. , attorney at law, 
Winchester, Ky. ; G 5, Bettie ; G 6, Alice, married Louis Woodford, 
in 1877, Pine Grove, Ky. ; G 7, Lelia, died, and G 8, Stella, 
died. 

E 4. Micajah Browning, son of Susannah, married, in 1801, Sarah 
Brown, and died in Harrison county, Ky. He emigrated from Cul- 
peper county, Va., to Kentucky. Sarah Brown was a daughter of 
Judge James Brown, of Bourbon county, Ky. 

Micajah Browning united the vocation of farmer and teacher. 
He was for many years a justice of the peace, and member of the 
County Court, and at the time of his death the presiding justice of 
the County Court. He had nine children, viz. : 

F 1. Talitha Ann Browning, married Captain Elijah 0. Bannon. 
He was a farmer, residing two and one-half miles from Lexington, 
Fayette county, Ky. At the time of his death he was high sheriff 
of Fayette county. They left issue, viz. : 

F 2, and F 3 — Amanda and Miranda — twins, daughters of Mica- 



134 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

jah Browning and Sarah Brown, born in 1804, both of whom died 
unmarried about twenty- five years of age. 

F 4. Hon. Orville Hiclsman Browning, son of Micajah, was born 
in 1806, in Harrison county, Ky. He studied law in Kentucliy and 
obtained license to practice in 1831. In the spring of the same year 
he located in Quincy, 111., where he has successfully practiced his 
profession. He is a member of the bar of the State of Illinois, 
and of the Circuit and Supreme Courts of the United States, his 
practice now being chiefly in the United States Courts and the Su- 
preme Court of Illinois. From August, 1836, to August, 1840, he 
was a member of the Senate of Illinois; and from August, 1840, to 
August, 1842, a member of the House of Representatives. On three 
occasions he has been a candidate for Congress in his district at the 
urgent solicitation of his friends, with a well-drilled political 
majority of from fifteen hundred to two thousand against him to 
start with. 

The most animated and laborious political campaign that was 
ever made in his State, was by Stephen A. Douglas and him. Judge 
Douglas beat him about three hundred votes. After the death of 
S. A. Douglas, he was elected to fill out his unexpired term as a 
member of the United States Congress. 

In 1866 he was appointed as the successor of Mr. Harlan, in the 
Department of the Interior, whose duties are to attend to the pub- 
lic lands, Indian affairs, pensions, patents, etc., at Washington 
City, D. C, during Johnson's administration. He married Eliza 
Caldwell, but left no living posterity. 

After his death the following obituary appeared in a Quincy, 111. , 
paper: 

OBITUARY. 

DEATH OF HON. O. H. BROWNING, A KENTUCKIAN OF NATIONAL REPUTATION. 
AT HIS HOME IN ILLINOIS. 

Quincy, III., August lith. 
Hon. O. H. Browning died at 11:45 last night. He had been ill but a 
few days, but despite the most watchful care of the leading physicians of 
the West, his disease terminated fatally. Mr. Browning was born in Har- 
rison county, Ky., in 1806. He was educated at Augusta College, In that 
State, and came to Quincy in 1831. In 1836, he was elected to the State 
Senate, having been engaged for five years in the practice of law and hav- 
ing risen rapidly in his profession and in public esteem. About thi first 
year of his term in the Senate he returned to Kentucky and married Miss 
Eliza H. Caldwell, who still survives him in good health and worldly com- 
fort. They had but one child born to them, which died in infancy, but 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 135 

they have an adopted daughter, who is now the wife of Orrin Slvinner, 
Esq. Mr. Browning served one term in the State Legislature in 1842, and 
in 1843 was the candidate of the Whigs for Congress, being defeated by the 
late Stephen A. Douglas by fifty votes. In 1861 he was appointed United 
States Senator by Governor Yates to fill the vacancy occasioned by the 
death of Stephen A. Douglas, and served for two years with credit and dis- 
tinction. While in Washington he was also engaged in the practice of law 
with the Hon. Jere S. Black and the Hon. Thos. G. Ewing. Andrew 
Johnson appointed Mr. Browning Secretary of the Interior, and he also 
acted as Attorney-General for a short time upon the retirement of Henry 
Stanberry, of Ohio. At the expiration of Mr. Browning's services as Sec- 
retary of the Interior he resumed the practice of law in Quincy, and has 
since resided here. He was a remarkably well-preserved man, and, despite 
his advanced age of seventy-five years, was engaged in active practice up 
to the time of his last illness. He possessed a profound knowledge of the 
law, being associated in important cases with the ablest attorneys of the 
country. In the death of Mr. Browning, Illinois loses almost the last one 
of the distinguished cluster of men who adorned and enlivened both politi- 
cal and legal circles in this part of the State forty years ago, and most of 
whom had in their time a national reputation. Among them were Abra- 
ham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Archibald Williams, Nehemiah Bush- 
nell, Judge Ralston, Colonel W. A. Richardson, Judge Skinner and Jackson 
Winsow. Mr. Browning fairly earned the respect and admiration of all 
who knew him, and the implicit confidence of his associates. Talented, 
courteous and charitable in the highest degree, he embodied qualities 
which won the esteem of all with whom he came in contact. 

F 5. Marcus Elliott Browning, son of Micajah, was born in 1807. 
For many years he resided in Lexington, Ky. , and nt one time was 
a dry goods merchant there, but of late years has been one of the 
chief clerks in the Northern Bank of Kentuck}^ in Lexington. He 
married a Miss Reese. 

F 6. Milton Davis Browning, son of Micajah, was born in 1809. 
Be is a practicing lawyer of high standing in Burlington, la. , and 
has been a member both of the Senate and House of Representatives 
of that State. He married a Miss Brown. 

F 7. Zelinda Field Browning, born in 1813, and died in 1817. 

F 8. Ann Davis Browning, daughter of Micajah, was born in 
1819. She married Dr. Wm. Robertson, whose first wife was Jane 
Madison, daughter of Miriam Lewis and Colonel Gabriel Madison, 
of Jessamine county, Ky. Dr. Robertson resided manj' years in 
Fayette county, Ky. , and finally settled near Rock House Prairie, 
Buchanan count}', Mo. They have several children, names unknown. 

F 9. Elizabeth Brown Browning, was born in 1822, and died in 
1836. 



136 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

J) 2. David Hickman, son of James and his wife, Haunali Lewis, 
was born in Culpeper county, Va. , in 1749, and moved to wliat is 
now Bourbon county, Ky., in 1784. In 1771 he married, in Vir- 
ginia, Clara McClanahan, by whom he raised ten children. He died 
in Bourbon county, Ky., in 1825. The following are the names of 
his children : 

E 1. Mrs. Pegg3', or Margaret Hutchinson, born 17^2. 

E 2. Mrs. Anna Markham, born 1775. 

E 3. Hon. John Lewis, born 1777. 

E 4. Mrs. Nancy Buford, born 1779; married John Buford. 

E 5. Mrs. Agnes Bledsoe, born 1781. 

E 6. Colonel Thomas, born 1782. 

E 7. Lieutenant James, born 1784, 

E 8. Captain David McClanahan, born 1788. 

E 9. Mrs. Lucy Moss, born 1789, and 

E 10. William, born 1792. 

E 1. Pegg}', or Margaret Hickman, was born in Culpeper 
count}^, Va. , in 1772. She married James Hutchinson, had twelve 
children and died in Missouri in 1844. The following are the names 
of hei' children : 

F 1. Lewis, married Miss Adams and resides in Pittsburg, 

Pa. 

F 2. James, resides near Boonville, Cooper county. Mo. 

F 3. Nancy. 

F 4. Margaret, married Johnson and Leonard, Cooper 

county, Mo. 

F 5. Eliza, married John Lewis Hickman, her cousin, and son 
of Colonel Thomas Hickman and his wife, Sarah Pruett, of Bourbon 
county, K3^ They reside near Boonville, Cooper count}-. Mo. 

F 6. David; F 7, Thomas; F 8, John; F 9, Clara; F 10, Will- 
iam; F 11, Mary, married Henry Buford, and F 12, Benjamin, of 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

E 2. Anna Hickman, was born in 1775. She married William 
Markham and resided in Bath county, Ky., where she died, child- 
less, in 1856. She was very remarkable for superior housekeeping 
and excessive nicety. One of her nephews, on his returning home 
from a visit to his Aunt Markham' s, was asked about her. His 
reply was that ' ' the last he saw of her, there was but one fly in the 
house and she was busily engaged brushing it out. ' ' 

E 3. Hon. John Lewis Hickman, was born in 1777, and died 
near Paris, Bourbon county, Ky., in 1849. He was an exceedingly 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 137 

enterprising business man, with mind far above mediocrity. He 
was for many years sheriff of his county, and served the county of 
Bourbon for many years in the Senate of Kentucky, continuing to 
represent his constituents in that capacity much longer than he 
wished, but in times of high political excitement he yielded to the 
solicitude of friends rather than abide by his own wishes. The chief 
portion of his life was spent on a farm. He married, in 1811, his 
cousin, Elizabeth Hickman, daughter of General Richard Hickman, 
by whom he had eight children, viz: 

F 1. Catharine C, born 1812; married Jas. K. Marshall. 

F 2. Richard, born 1813; died of cholera in 1833. 

F 3. Edward L., born 1815; died in 1833. 

F 4. Lydia E., born 1817; married Richard P. Shelby. 

F 5. Margaret, born 1819. 

F 6. John Lewis, born 1821; married Adelia Edwards. 

F7. David H., born 1823. 

F 8. Caroline P., born 1829; married Wm. Duke. 

F 1. Catharine C, married James K. Marshall, a lawyer by pro- 
fession, who, after practicing his profession some j^ears, turned his 
attention to farming and merchandising in the year 1828. They had 
seven children, viz. : 

Gr 1. Bettie, who married Henry Buford, of "Woodford county, 
Ky. ; he died in Milwaukee, Wis., in 1852, leaving one child, 
Henry. G 2, John Lewis, who married a Miss Turner, daughter of 
Judge Turner, of Lexington, Ky., and now, in 1857, resides at 
Milwaukee, Wis.; G 3, Charles, died single, in Milwaukee; G 4, 
Alexander; G 5, James; G (J, Mary, and G 7, Kate. They all live 
in Milwaukee, Wis. 

F 4. Lydia, daughter of Hon. Jno. L. Hickman, married, in 
1834, Richard P. Shelby, son of General James Shelby, of Fayette 
county, Ky. , and grandson of Governor Shelby. They had three 
children, all dying young, except James, who married in 1855, 
moved to Missouri, where he committed suicide in 1856, leaving an 
infant child, which has since died.* 

F 5. Margaret, daughter of Hon. J. L. Hickman, was born in 
1819, and married Wm. H. Shackelford in 1837, a merchant at that 
time in Richmond, Ky. , and since engaged in the same business in 
Paris, Ky. She died in 1844, and had four children, viz. : 

G 1. Bettie H., born 1838; G 2, Mattie, born 1840; G 3, Hick- 
man, born 1841, and died 1842, and G 4, William, born 1844. 

F 6. John Lewis, son of Hon. J. L. Hickman, was born 1821; 



138 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

is a farmer; married, in 1844, Adelia Edwards, and lias children, 
viz. : 

G 1. Bettie E. ; G 2, Margaret S. ; Gl 3, Caroline D. ; G 4, 
Adelia, etc. 

F 7. David H., son of Hon. J. L. Hickman, born 1823, died 
single, 1849. 

F 8. Caroline P., was born in 1829 and married Wm. Duke, a 
farmer, in 1847. Mr. Duke was a soldier in the Mexican war. 
They had five children, viz.: 

G 1. John Lewis, who died in infancy; G 2, Mary; G 3, Bessie; 
G 4, Charlotte, and G 5, Caroline. 

E 4. Nancy, daughter of David Hickman and his wife, Clara 
McClanahan, was born in 1779. She married John Buford, a mer- 
chant in Versailles, Woodford county, Ky. He was a very energetic 
business man. They raised three children, viz. : 

F 1, Helen, who married a Mr. Johnson and left children. One 
of her daughters married J. G. Morrison. 

F 2. Colonel Buford, and 

F 3. General Napoleon Buford, who was an officer in the Federal 
Army during the Confederate war, and died from wounds received, 
or was killed in battle, an account of which was published in 
the St. Louis (Mo.) Republican during one of the last years of 
the war. 

The following account of General Buford we clip from a news- 
paper: "General Buford, who died on Wednesday last at the house 
of General Stoneman, in Washington, was the son of the well-known 
stock grower in Kentucky and brother of Colonel Buford, of this 
State. He was forty-two j'ears of age, and was made a major-gen- 
eral for his distinguished services on the very day he died. He was 
one of the most dashing and fearless cavalry officers in the service, 
and leaves behind an unspotted name as an earnest and gallant 
officer. ' ' 

E 5. Agnes Hickman, daughter of David and Clara, was 
born in 1781, and married Joseph Bledsoe. She raised six 
children, viz. : 

F 1. Hiram, married Susan Hughes. 

F 2. Thomas, married Miss Wilson. 

F 3. David, married. 

F 4. Joseph, married. 

F 5 and 6. Two daughters that married. 

The family moved and settled near Lexington, Mo. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 139 

[From Mississippian, November, 1863.1 
CAPTAIN HIRAM BLEDSOE. 

This gallant Missouri officer, at the battle of Chickamauga, command- 
ing his battery, performed a feat that is well worth chronicling. The 
battery charged a Federal battery on that eventful day that proved to be 
the so-called 1st Missouri Federal Battery, and captured all the guns, which 
were presented to the battery immediately on the field of battle. They 
sent their own guns to the rear and found themselves supplied with twelve- 
pound Napoleons. All hail to the 1st Missouri Battery and its gallant 
Captain, Hiram Bledsoe, 

[From the Mississippian.] 
BLEDSOE'S MISSOURI BATTERY. 

During the terrific shelling near Marietta on the evening of the 20th, a 
shell from the enemy's guns exploded in the vicinity of Bledsoe's Battery, 
killing almost instantly Captain Bledsoe and twelve of his men. 

The news of the death of this gallant officer and estimable gentleman 
will be received by every Missourian with feelings of the most profound 
sorrow. Nor will this regret be confined to people from his own State 
alone. His long and distinguished services, his dauntless bravery and self- 
sacrificing devotion to his country's cause had given him a high place in 
the confidence and esteem of his superior officers, while his genial tempera- 
ment and unselfish disposition endeared him to his more immediate com- 
rades, who will mourn him as a brother. 

Captain Bledsoe served with distinction during the Mexican war, and 
upon the breaking out of the present troubles was one of the first to raise 
and equip a company of artillery in the State of Missouri. He participated 
in the battles of Carthage, Oak Hills, Dry Wood (where he was wounded), 
Lexington and Elk Horn, in all of which he received the highest encomiums 
from the commanding generals for his skill and gallantry. Subsequently, 
he took part in the battles of luka and Corinth, and was one of the defend- 
ers of Port Hudson. 

Missouri has sufi'ered severely during this struggle — not so much in 
numbers, perhaps, as some other States, but in the sacrifice of the best 
blood of her citizens — and while she can point with mournful pride to the 
graves of Bowen, Green, Weightman, Little and a host of other noble 
spirits whose glorious deeds and sacrifices have shed an imperishable lustre 
on her name, yet when the story of her trials and triumphs shall have been 
written and the names of her martyred heroes recorded, to point her youth 
to the paths of glory and of honor, none will occupy a brighter page than 
that of Hiram M. Bledsoe. 

E 6. Colonel Thomas Hickman, son of David and Clara McClau- 
ahan, was born in 1782; married Sarah Pruett, in 1803. They 
were members of the Campbellite or Christian church, and both 
died in Bourbon county, Ky., in 1854. He served a time as a sol- 



140 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

dier in fighting the Indians about the lakes. They raised six chil- 
dren, viz. : 

F 1. John Lewis, born in 1804; married Elizabeth Hutchinson. 

F 2. Ann, born in 1805; married Robert McGavock. 

F 3. Clara, born in 1807. 

F 4. James Pruett, born in 1814. 

F 5. Sophia W., born in 1818. 

F 6. David William, born in 1822. 

F 1. John L. Hickman, son of Colonel Thomas, married his 
cousin, Eliza Hutchinson, daughter of Peggy, or Margaret Hutchin- 
son. He died near Boonville, Cooper county. Mo. 

F 2. Ann, daughter of Colonel Thomas Hickman, was born in 
Jessamine county, Ky., in 1805. When twelve years of age (1817) 
her father moved from Bourbon county, Ky., to Howard county, 
Mo. In 1819 she was married to Robert McGavock, a lawyer by 
profession, who was born in Wythe county, Va., in 1794. They re- 
side at Cloverport, Ky. They raised eight children, viz. : 

G 1. Randal H., was born in Howard county. Mo., in 1820; mar- 
ried in 1851, Miss Ann Hite, of Jefferson county, Ky., and now re- 
sides near Haynesville, Hancock county, Ky. They have seven chil- 
dren, as follows: 

H 1. Robert, born in Breckinridge county, Ky., in 1852. 

H 2. Thomas, born in 1854, 

H 3. Francis, born in 1856. 

H 4. William, born in 1858. 

H 5. Oscar, born in 1860. 

H 6. Maggie, born in 1862, and 

H7. Lillian, born in 1864. 

G 2. Thomas McGavock, was born in Howard county, Mo. , in 
1823; was married in 1846, to Mary Lightfoot, of Breckinridge 
county, Ky. He died in Breckinridge county, Ky., in 1860, and his 
wife died the same year in Howard county. Mo. They left seven 
children, viz. : 

H 1. Daniel Cloyd McGavock, born in 1847; served in the Con- 
federate Army under General Price, and died in Arkansas in 1865. 

H 2. Rosa, was born in Breckinridge county, Ky. , in 1850. 

H 3. Annie, was born in Hancock county. Mo., in 1851. 

H 4. Lander, was born in Breckinridge county, Ky., in 1853. 

H 5. Ada, was born in Breckinridge county, Ky., in 1855. 

H 6. Emma, was born in Breckinridge county, Ky., in 1857, 

H 7. Gordon, was born in Howard county, Mo., in 1860. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 141 

Emma and Gordon both died in Breckinridge county, K}-., in 
18G0. 

Gr 3. Jacob McGavock, was born in Howard county, Mo., in 
1824, and was married in 1845, to Elizabeth Haynes, of Davis 
county, Ky. They have children as follows: 

H 1. Sarah, born in Breckinridge county, Ky., in 1845. 

H 2. Mary, born in Davis count}', Ky. , in 1847. 

H 3. James, born in Davis county, Ky., in 1849. 

H 4. Ella, born in Davis county, Ky., in 1860. 

H 5. Morgan, born in Tennessee, in 1862. 

H 6. Ida, born in Breckinridge county, K}-., in 1864. 

H 7. Robert, born in Athens, Ala., in 1866. 

Jacob McGavock, resides near Athens, Ala. 

G 4. Robert McGavock, was born in Breckinridge county, K3^, 
in 1826, and resides near Franklin, Howard county. Mo. He has 
been twice married: first to Matilda Bonduraut, in 1853, who died 
in 1854. His second wife was Sally Cruz, whom he married in 
1856. They have children as follows: 

H 1. William, born in Howard county, Mo., in 1862. 

H 2. James, born in Howard county. Mo., in 1864. 

H 3. Rosa, born in Howard county. Mo., in 1866, etc. 

G 5. James McGavock, was born in Breckinridge county, Ky. , 
in 1828; resides near Franklin, Howard county. Mo. He married in. 
1856, Martha Talbott, of Howard county. Mo. They have children, 
viz. : 

H 1. Charles, born in 1863. 

H 2. Kate, born in 1866. 

G 6. Gordon McGavock, was born in Breckinridge county, Ky., 
1839, and resides near Frauklin, Howard county, Mo. He married 
in 1860, Lucy Lewis, whose father was a Baptist minister of Vir- 
ginia. They have children as follows: 

H 1. John, born in 1860. 

H 2. Sallie, born in 1862. 

H 3. Mary Cloyd, born in 1867. 

G 7. John McGavock, was born in Breckinridge county, Ky., in 
1834, and resides near Cloverport, Breckinridge county, Ky. He 
married in 1860, Bettie Skillman, of said county. They have chil- 
dren, viz. : 

H 1. Leon, born in 1860. 

H 2. Marion, born in 1862. 

H 3. Gordon, born in 1864, etc. 



142 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY, 

G 8. Francis McGavock, was born in 1840 and resides near 
Cloverport, Ky. In 1865 he was married to Maggie Cunningliam, 
daughter of Rev. Alexander Cunningham, a Presbyterian minister 
of Franklin, Tenn. They have children, viz. : 

H 1. Lynn, born in 1867, etc. 

F 3. Clara Hickman, daughter of Colonel Thomas and Sarah 
Pruett, was born in 1807; was twice married and now resides, a 
widow, at Boonville, Cooper county, Mo. Her first husband was 
Jones H. Flournoy, of Kentucky. He was a merchant and farmer. 
They had five children, viz. : 

G 1. Sarah A., married Andrew Adams. 

G 2. Eliza M., married Geo. W. Cook; had one child: HI, 
James H., who died. 

G 3. Mary Lenora, married Robert W. Simpson, in 1854, and 
had three children, viz. : HI. Frank Flournoy; H 2, Clara A., and 
H 3, Thomas. Mary Lenora resides at Boonville, Cooper county, 
Mo. 

G 4. Martha Markham, married Robt. T. Ross. 

G 5. Napoleon L., died in childhood. 

F 4. James P. Hickman, son of Colonel Thomas and Sarah 
Pruett, was born in 1814, and was once a merchant at Chihuahua, 
Mex. ; now living in San Autonia, Tex. ; married a Spanish lady, 
and has five children, viz. : G 1, James; G 2, John; G 3, Thomas; 
G 4, David, and G 5, Sarah. 

F 5. Sophia AV. Hickman, daughter of Colonel Thomas, born in 
1818; married James 0. Toole, of St. Joseph, Mo. Her children 
are: G 1, John; G 2, William; G 3, Mary, and G 4, Sophia. So- 
phia W. has been dead for many years. 

F 6. David W. Hickman, son of Colonel Thomas, was a mer- 
chant, and died in Chihuahua, Mex. 

E 7. Lieut. James Hickman, son of David and his wife, Clara 
McClanahan, was born in Bourbon county, Ky., in 1784. He was 
an educated and accomplished gentleman; a graduate of Prince- 
ton College, New Jersey, and for some time in his early manhood, 
connected with the regular army of the United States. He read law 
but did not practice his profession ; was a merchant at Old Franklin, 
Howard count}'. Mo., and was a man of great energy of character. 

He married Sophia "Woodson in 1817, and died in Boone county. 
Mo., in 1826. Sophia was a daughter of Josiah Woodson, of Gooch- 
land county, Va. Her sister is the mother of the present Mrs. 
John J. Crittenden, of Kentucky. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 143 

Lieutenant James Hickman and his wife, Sopliia, had but three 
children, viz. : 

F 1. William, born in 1819, died in Kentucky in 1832. 

F 2. Mary Elizabeth, born in 1821. 

F 3. Laura, born 1823, died in St. Louis, Mo., in 1841. 

F 2. Mary Elizabeth, the only child the}' had to marry, now 
resides with her husband, James S. Rollins, in "Columbia, Boone 
county, Mo. They were married in 1837. 

Major James Sidney Rollins was the eldest son of Dr. Anthony 
Wayne Rollins and Sallie Rodes; born in Richmond, Madison 
count}', Ky. , in 1812: was educated at Washington College, Penn- 
sylvania, and the University of Indiana, where he graduated in 
1830; from thence he came to Missouri and settled in Boone county, 
studied law with Judge Abril Leonard ; graduated at the Law School 
Transylvania University at Lexington, Ky. , in 1833; was married 
in 1837 to Miss Mary E. Hickman, daughter of James and Sophia 
Woodson; elected to the Legislature of Missouri from«Boone county 
in 1838, 1840 and 1842; was a delegate to the Whig National Con- 
vention of 1844, at Baltimore, that nominated Henry Clay for the 
Presidency. In 1846 was elected to the Senate of Missouri from 
the district composed of Boone and Audrain counties some four 
years. In 1848 was nominated by the Whig Convention of Mis- 
souri for Governor ; made a laborious canvass of the State, and was 
beaten by R. A. King, twelve thousand votes. In 1849 was the 
candidate of the Whig party for United States Senate ; beaten by Hon. 
D. R. Achison. In 1850 appointed a visitor to attend the annual ex- 
amination of cadets at West Point, X. Y. In 1852 was placed on 
the Whig ticket as one of the Presidential electors, General Scott, 
the candidate. In 1854 nominated by the Whigs of Boone county 
for the Legislature and elected by a large majority. In 1856 was 
again placed on the Presidential electoral ticket. In 1857 was nom- 
inated again for Governor of the State by the Whig and American 
parties, but was beaten two hundred and thirty votes — nearly one 
hundred thousand cast. In 1861 and 1862 he was a member of the 
United States Congress, and for awhile was President of the Union 
Pacific Railroad. Major Rollins and his wife, Mary E., had ten chil- 
dren, as follows: 

G 1. Sophia Woodson, born 1839, and died 1841. 

G 2. James Hickman, born 1841; educated at West Point, N. Y. 

G 3. Laura Hickman, born 1844. 

G 4. Mary Elizabeth, born 1846. 



144 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

G 5. Sallie Rodes, bom 1849. 

G 6. Heniy Bingham, born 1851. 

G 7. Custis, bom 1853. 

8. Flora, born 1855. 

G 9. Frank, bom 1858. 

G 10. Woodson Rodes, born 1860. 

E 8. Captain David McClanahau Hickman, son of David and 
Clara, was born in Bourbon county, K3^, in 1788, and emigrated to 
Missouri in 1823, and settled on the farm where he died. 

The following obituary notice is copied from a paper published 
in Columbia, Boone county, Mo. 

Died, at his residence in Boone count}-, on the two-mile prairie, on the 
morning of the 14th inst. (June, 1851), at 4 o'clock, of dropsy of the chest, 
Captain David McClanahan Hickman, aged sixty-three years. The deceased 
was born in Bourbon county, Ky., and emigrated to Missouri in 1823, and 
settled on the farm where he died. It may be said in truth that in his. 
death the county and the State lost one of its most useful, honorable and 
enterprising cifizens. In both his public and private career no man was 
more highly esteemed. He was prompt and energetic in all his business en- 
gagements. With his friends he was liind, sociable and entertaining, whilst 
his home was ever the abode of a generous and warm-hearted hospitality. 
In the War of 1812 he was a volunteer, and served a tour of twelve months' 
duty. He was elected first lieutenant in the companj' commanded by 
Captain William Garrad, which was attached to the squadron commanded 
by Colonel Ball. Prior to his leaving Kentucky he was for a number of 
years Sheriff of Bourbon county, and served as a member of the Kentucky 
Legislature, from the same county, in the winters of 1819 and 1820. Dur- 
ing the Black Hawk war, in 1832, he was again a volunteer and was chosen 
captain of a company raised in this county, and served a tour of duty on 
the northern frontier of the State. In the year 1838 and again in 1840, he 
was elected to the Legislature from this county, and in 1845 to the conven- 
tion to remodel the Constitution. The duties of the various public trusts 
confided to his hands he discharged with the utmost fidelity. He was the 
last living brother, and leaves but one sister, out of a numerous family. 
A few years since he made a profession of religion and united himself with 
the Baptist church in his neighborhood. During his last illness he had all 
the comfort and consolation which the attention of an affectionate family, 
kind and numerous friends and neighbors, and the steady faith of a Chris- 
tian could give. He frequently expressed himself as perfectly resigned to 
the will of God. Thus, he lived and died a good man, leaving an example 
worthy of imitation, whilst his death will be deeply lamented by all whp. 
knew him. 

E 8. Captain David McC. Hickman, was twice married. His first 
wife was Eliza K. Johnson, whom he married in 1818, and by whom 
he had three children, viz. : 

F 1. William Thomas; F 2, Hon. David Henry, and F 3, James J. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 145 

His second wife, Cornelia A. Bryan, whom he married in 1829, 
had five children, viz. : 

F 4. Thaddeus B. ; F 5, Sarah Ann; F 6, John Lewis; F 7, Mil- 
ton, died in infancy, and F 8, Thomas Harvey. 

F 1. Wm. Thomas, son of Captain McC. Hickman, is a farmer 
and resides in Boone county, Mo. He is a deacon in the Baptist 
church, and was once sheriff of the county. He married Fannie 
Woods, by whom he has children as follows: G 1, David M. ; G 2, 
Martha; G 3, Clara, etc. 

F 2. Hon. David Henry Hickman, resides in Columbia, Boone 
county. Mo. ; is a member of the Baptist church, and was elected to 
the Legislature from Boone county and served the session of 1852 
and 1853. As a member of the Committee on Education he drafted 
the school law of Missouri, which was passed at that session. He is 
President of the Board of Curators of Columbia Baptist Female 
College, at Columbia; also President of the Board of Trustees of 
William Jewett College, at Liberty, in Clay county, the chief college 
of the Baptist denomination of Missouri. He was elected one of the 
curators of the Missouri University by the last General Assembly of 
Missouri. He has been President of the bank at Columbia ever 
since its organization. He is a man of great energy of character, 
of fine accomplishments, yet of feeble constitution. He has had 
more duties imposed on him than he could properly discharge ; not- 
withstanding, he did all he could, especially for the cause of educa- 
tion and the advancement of general knowledge. His fellow-citizens 
had every confidence in his integrity and ability, and he discharged 
all the duties imposed on him with fidelity and honesty. He mar- 
ried Miss Ann Bryan and has children. 

F 3. James J. Hickman, son of Captain David McC, resides in 
Boone county. Mo. He married Sophia Edmonson and has children, 
viz. : G 1, John Gay; G 2, James, etc. 

F 4. Thaddeus B. Hickman in early life was a farmer; is a 
member of the Baptist church and resides at Columbia, Boone 
county. Mo. He is now (1886) engaged in the grocery-store business 
and has no children. 

F 5. Sarah Ann Hickman, married Dr. Archibald Young ; resides 
at Columbia, Boone county, Mo., and has children as follows: G 1, 
David H. ; G 2, Martha, etc. Sarah Ann is a member of the Bap- 
tist church. 

F 6. John Lewis Hickman, of Boone county, Mo., married Ella 
Walker. 
10 



146 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

F 7. Milton Hickman, died in cliildhood. 

F 8. Thomas Harvey Hickman. 

E 9. Lucy Hickman, daughter of David and Clara McClanahan, 
was born 1787, and married Mason Moss. She had nine children; 
died in 1841, and he died in 1838. Their children are, viz. : 

F 1. David McClanahan Moss, who married Catharine Coates, 
has children and resides near Carrollton, Carroll county. Mo. 

F 2. Eliza Margaret Moss, married Matthew Jeffreys, a farmer 
of Boone county. Mo. They have seven or eight children. 

F 3. Henry H. Moss, married Harriet Egar; started to California 
in 1849; his wife died on the route, within forty miles of Nevada 
City, and their infant child died soon after reaching California. He 
returned with an only son to Missouri, and is now deputy marshal 
at St. Joseph, Mo. 

F 4. Benjamin F. Moss, died single, in Platte county, Mo., in 
1843; aged twenty-five. 

F 5. Charles Mason Moss, died single, in Callaway county, Mo. , 
twenty-five years of age. 

F 6. Clara A. Moss, was born in 1821; was married, in 1840, to 
Waltour Bobinson ; now resides a widow near Paris, Monroe county, 
Mo., her husband having died in 1846 in Lawrence county, Mo. 
She has seven children, viz. : 

G 1. Temple Buford; G 2, Lucy Hickman; G 3, Catharine 
Marshall; G 4, Laura Virginia; G 5, Waltour Moss; G 6, Charles 
Mason ; G 7, Willie Henry. 

F 7. Thomas Tomkins Moss, married a Miss Smith, who survived 
their marriage only a few months. He afterward married Sarah 
Brown. Thomas T. was a farmer and died near Mexico, Audrain 
county. Mo. , aged about twenty-eight 3'ears. 

F 8. Nancy Beauford Moss, died in 1857, aged about twenty- 
eight years. 

E 10. William Hickman, son of David and Clara McClanahan, 
was born in 1792, and died in Bourbon county, Ky., in 1845. He 
married Mary Tureman and raised ten children, viz. : 

F 1. David, died of cholera. 

F 2. Elizabeth, resides in Paris, Ky. 

F 3. Ann, married John Schackelford, of St. Louis, Mo. 

F4. Thaddeus. 

F 5. Mary, married Dr. Owens, of Paris, Ky. 

F 6. Martha, married Dr. R. T. Davis, son of Garrett Davis. 

F 7. Laura, Paris, Ky. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FiiMILY. 147 

F 8. Clara, married Wm. Hood, of Scott county, Ky. 

F 9. Irene, married "Wm. H. Bass, son of Eli, of Boone countyj 
Mo. 

F 10. Rebecca, Paris, Ky. 

D 3. Anna Hickman, daughter of James and his wife, Hannah 
Lewis, of Clark county, Ky. , was»born in Culpeper county, Va. , in 
1754, and died in Clark county, Ky., in 1836. About the year 1783 
she married Stephen HoUaday, a farmer, whose weight was about 
two hundred and twenty pounds, with dark hair and hazel eyes. 
They raised seven children, viz. : 

E 1. Elliott; E 2, Jemima; E 3, James, died single; E 4, Jo- 
seph; E 5, Lewis; E 6, Elizabeth, and E 7, Waller. 

E 1. Elliott, the oldest child of Anna and Stephen, was born in 
1786 — two years after his father moved to Kentucky. In 1812 he 
volunteered at Winchester, Clark county, Ky. , to fight the Indians. 
He was a member of Major (then Captain) John Martin's company, 
and after two days' hard fighting on the 18th and 22d of January, 
1813, he was taken prisoner at Winchester's defeat at the river 
Raisin. He suffered much from cold and cruel treatment of the In- 
dians, and finall}^ had to give up his gun to them to save his own 
life. After being exchanged he made his way home, where he ar- 
rived in April, 1813. In 1814 he married Rachel Johnson, whose 
parents were from Maryland. Elliott and his wife were both mem- 
bers of the Campbellite or Christian church — he joined in 1810, and 
his wife in 1841. 

All of Elliott Holladay's eleven children were born in Clark 
county, Ky. , except Margaret Jemima, their youngest, who was 
born in Pike county. Mo., where her father died in 1869. The names 
of their children are as follows: 

F 1. Eliza Ann, born 1815; married Samuel Crutcher. 

F 2. Samuel Wilson, born 1817. 

F 3. Mary, born 1819; married Ambrose Crutcher. 

F 4. Sarah, born 1821 ; married Harvey B. Pritchett. 

F 5. Nancy, born 1823 ; married Braxton L. Hickman. 

F 6. Martha Jane, born 1824; married Samuel N. Purse. 

F 7. Emily, born 1825; married Wm. Cash and Elija J. Strother. 

F 8. James Waller, born 1827. 

F 9. Lewis, born 1829. 

F 10. Owen, born 1832. 

F 11. Margaret Jemima, born 1837. 

F 1. Eliza Ann Holladay, was a member of the Christian church; 



148 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

was married, in 1836, to Samuel Crutcher, of Montgomery county. 
Mo. She had three sons and died in 1847. The names of her chil- 
dren are as follows: G 1, Elliot Waller; G 2, Obanion, and G 3, 
James W. 

F 2. Samuel Wilson Holladay, was born 1817; is a farmer, living 
in Pike county, Mo. ; weighs one hundred and forty pounds, with 
black hair and black eyes. 

F 3. Mary Holladay, was born 1819, and married Ambrose 
Crutcher, a cousin to Sam, who married her sister, Eliza A. Mary 
has four children, viz. 

G 1. Elizabeth Ann; G 2, Sarah Frances, married a Mr. Wright, 
a house carpenter, in Paris, Monroe county. Mo., and has one child;. 
G 3, Rachel, died, and G 4, Samuel W. 

F 4. Sarah Holladay, born 1821; weighs about one hundred and 
fifteen pounds, with black eyes and dark hair. She married in 1840, 
Harvey B. Pritchett, a farmer, of Pike county. Mo. They have 
children, viz. : 

G 1. Mary Ann; G 2, Edwin; G 3, Melissa; G 4, Eliza Ann; 
G 5, Samuel W. ; G 6, Christina, etc. Sarah and Mr. Pritchett are 
both members of the Christian church. 

F 5. Nancy Holladay, born 1823; was married in 1843 to her 
cousin, Braxton L. Hickman, son of Lewis and his wife, Sally 
Thompson, of De Witt county. 111. Braxton L. has a steam flour- 
mill at Ashley, Pike county, Mo. Nancy, his wife, is a member of 
the Christian church. They have children, viz.: G 1. Sarah Ann; 
G 2, Marcellus; G 3, Rodney; G 4, Laura, and G 5, David. 

F 6. Martha Jane Holladay, born 1824, was married in 1846 to- 
Sam. N. Purse, a mechanic engaged in making grass or wheat cut- 
ters, carding machines, etc. He has a foundry and does his own 
casting, etc. , at Ashley, Pike county, Mo. They have children, viz. : 

G 1. Irene; G 2, Zach Taylor; G 3, Dolly, etc. 

F 7. Emily Holladay, born 1825; weighs about one hundred and 
forty pounds, with black hair and eyes. She has been twice mar- 
ried, first to Wm. Cash, in 1844, by whom she had three children. 
Mr. Cash died in 1852. About 1855 she married her second hus- 
band, Elija J. Strother, by whom she has children, viz. : 

G 1. Claudius Cash; G 2, Jas. E. Cash; G 3, daughter, died; 
G 4, Ella Strother, etc. 

F 8. James Waller Holladay, born 1827, and died in Cincinnati, 
0., in 1852. He was five feet eleven inches in height, weighing 
about one hundred and fifty pounds, with dark hair and eyes. He 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 149 

■was a very ingenious mechanic, and worked in metals of all kinds. 
He learned his trade under Sam. N. Purse, of Ashley, Pike county, 
Mo. 

F 9. Lewis Holladaj', born 1829; is five feet eleven inches high, 
weighing one hundred and fifty pounds, with dark hair and eyes ; is 
a farmer and resides in Pike county, Mo. 

F 10. Owen Holladay, born 1832; is five feet nine and one-half 
inches high, weighing one hundred and forty pounds, with black 
hair and eyes. He was raised a farmer, but for some years has 
been engaged in merchandising, and lives now, perhaps, at Pike's 
Peak, la. 

F 11. Margaret Jemima Holladay, born 1837, in Pike county, 
Mo. She weighs about one hundred and eighteen pounds, with dark 
hair and eyes. 

E 2. Jemima Holladay, daughter of Stephen and his wife, Anna 
Hickman, was born in 1788, She was beautiful and amiable, and 
entertained great sympathy for those whom she saw in distress, and 
for the aged. She married in 1809, Elija Harris, by whom she had 
only one child: F 1. Lucy F., who was born in 1810. Her mother 
(Jemima) was subject to spasms. In 1812, Lucy was sitting in her 
mother's lap by the fire, when the latter took a spasm, and no one 
being near, she fell into the fire and was burned to death. Lucy, her 
child, was also slightly burnt. Anna Holladay, her grandmother, 
then took the child and raised her. She married Benj. R. Waller, a 
very respectable young man of fine moral character, of good infor- 
mation, and prepossessing in his manners ; was a carpenter by trade, 
and resided near Winchester, Ky. , until he moved to Cooper county, 
Mo., in 1841. B. R. Waller sympathized with the South during 
the rebellion of 1861, consequently suffered many insults from the 
Federals. B. R, Waller and his wife, Lucy, had fourteen children, 
viz. : 

Frances Ann, born 1828; married D. M. Johnson. 

Robert Edward, born 1830; married Ann E. Guthrie. 

1st Jemima E., born 1832 and died 1834. 

Elizabeth, died in childhood. 

Mary Jane, born 1834; married Robert J. Parrish. 

John Adams, born 1835; a teacher. 

Lucy Harris, born 1838; a teacher. 

2d Jemima E., born 1840 and died 1860. 

Benj. Franklin, born 1841; a teacher. 
G 10. Elmira Louisa, born 1844. 



G 


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150 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS EAMILT. 

G 11. Virginia, born 1846. 

G 12. James Harris, born 1848. 

G 13. Sarah Robinson, born 1850, and 

G 14. Wm. Pruett, born 1852. 

They all live in Cooper county, Mo. 

G 1. Frances Ann, married David M. Johnson, an eminent law- 
yer from Ohio, in 1851, now lives in Troy, Kan., and has children, 
viz.: H 1, John Lee, died; H 2, Benj. Waller, died; H 3, Waller 
Sheridan, born 1853; H 4, James Young, born 1857; H 5, Eliza 
Jane, born 1862; H 6, Laura, born 1864. 

G 2. Robert Edward Waller, born 1830; married, in 1862, to 
Ann E. Guthrie, of Missouri, and resides in Cooper county, Mo. 
They have children, viz.: H 1, John; H 2, James, etc. Robt. 
Edward is a great mathematician. 

G 5. Mary Jane Waller, born 1834; married, in 1857, Robert 
J. Parrish, once a merchant, now a farmer, living near Bell Air, 
Cooper county, Mo. They have children, viz. : H 1, Louisa L. ; 
H 2, Margaret Jemima ; H 3, Lucy Virginia; H 4, Benj. Franklin. 

G 10. Elmira Louisa Waller, of Bell Air, Cooper county. Mo., is 
an amiable and accomplished young lady of great promise. Her 
poems will probably be published some day. She has had many 
pieces published in the newspapers. 

E 3. James Holladay, son of Stephen and Anna, died single, 

E 4. Joseph Holladay, son of Stephen and Anna, was born in 
1791; married Sally Woolfolk, whose mother was a Lewis. He died 
in Clarke county, Ky., in 1855. They had ten children, viz. : F 1, 
Milton F. ; F 2, Betsy, married C. Ferguson; F 3, John, died; F 4, 
Stephen; F 5, Joseph; F 6, Sally, married John McCalla; F 7, 
Benjamin F., a farmer, living on his father's old place, married A. 
E. Brown in 1855 and has children, viz.: G 1, Sarah Frances, etc. ; 
F 8, David, died; F 9, Lewis, married a Miss Brown, sister of Ben- 
jamin's wife, and F 10, Maria. 

E 5. Lewis Holladay, son of Stephen and Anna, was born in 
1793. He raised only one daughter, and died in Clark county, 
Ky., viz.: F 1, Martha Ann, his daughter, married Samuel A. 
Woodford, of Clarke county, Ky. , and has children, viz. : 

G 1. Mildred, born 1842; G 2, Elizabeth, born 1846; G 3, Marj^ 
born 1851; G 4, Lewis, born 1853; G 5, Lucy, born 1856. 

E 6. Elizabeth Holladay, daughter of Stephen, born 1795; mar- 
ried John Huston; had one child and died in Fayette county, 
Ky., in 1833. F 1, Nancy, her daughter, married James Hall, of 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 151 

Bourbon county, Ky., and left one daughter: G 1, Elizabeth Hall^ 
who married Rob. S. Taylor, of Clark county, Ky. They have 
children, viz.: H 1, Sally; H 2, Annie, etc. 

E 7. Waller Hollada}', son of Stephen and Anna, was born in 
1797. He married, in 1843, Sarah A. Dunahoo, who was the widow 
of James H. Whittingtou when he married her. She had one son, 
James, by Whittington, and had three children by Waller Holladay. 
She was an accomplished lady and admired by all who knew her on 
account of her great beauty and suavity of manners. She died 
in 1852, aged thirty-one years, leaving three children by her last 
husband, viz. : 

F 1. Cordelia, born 1844; F 2, Jemima Jane, born 1846, and 
F 3, Ann Eliza, born in 1848. 

D 4. Rev. Henry Hickman, son of James and his wife, Hannah 
Lewis, was born in Culpeper county, Va., in 1755. He was a 
graduate of William and Mary College, Virginia. He married 
Phebe Eastham. They were members of the Baptist church and 
had eight children, and died in Fayette county, Ky. , in 1804. The 
following are the names of their children : 

E 1. Frank, died in childhood in Virginia. 

E 2. Nancy, died in childhood in Virginia. 

E 3. Wm. Lewis, born in 1776; married Sarah F. Thompson. 

E 4, Lucy, born in 1778; married Belain P. Evans. 

E 5. Mary, died a young woman. 

E 6. William L., born 1790; married Sallie Pearson. 

E 7. Richard, born 1795; married Susan Combs. 

E 8. Fanny Lawson, born 1797; died single. 

E 3. Wm. Lewis Hickman, son of Rev. Henry and Phebe East- 
ham, was born in 1776 and died in 1842. He lived many years in 
Clark county, Ky., and moved to De Witt county. 111., in 1836. In 
1801 he married Sarah F. Thompson in Kentucky. Sarah was born 
in 1782, and died in 1848 in Illinois. They lived near Clinton, De 
Witt county, 111,, and had eighteen children, viz. : 

F 1. Louisa Verona, born 1802; married Geo. L. Hill. 

Laurinda Eastham, born 1804; married John Bostick. 

Rosanna Brooking, born 1805. 

Emily Temple, born 1806; married Paschal Mills. 

Mary Byrd, born 1807; married Thos. I. Rogers. 

Albert H. , born 1808; married Harriet Grymes. 

Rodney Elbridge, born 1809; married Elizabeth Wallace. 

Braxton Lewis, born 1810; married Nancy Holladay. 



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152 ■ GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

F 9. John Hart, born 1811; married Rachel D. Giddings. 

F 10. lantha C, born 1813; died 1814. 

F 11. Paschal Preble, born 1814; died 1853. 

F 12. Llewellen Bloomfield, born 1817; married Cynthia A. 
Brown. 

F 13. Susan Frances, born 1818; married Samuel Duncan. 

F 14. William Wallace, born 1820; married Sarah A. Condiflf 
and Elvira Mintum. 

F 15. David Addenbrook, born 1821; died in childhood, 1824. 

F 16. Sarah Melvina, born 1822; died single. 

F 17. Joel, born 1824, died in infancy. 

F 18. James, born 1826; died in infancy. 

F 1. Louisa Verona Hickman, daughter of Lewis and his wife, 
Sarah F. Thompson, was born in 1802, and in 1822 she married 
George Littlewood Hill, who was born in 1797. She died on the 
25th of September, 1886, at Clinton, De Witt county. 111., when the 
following obituary notice appeared in a Clinton paper: 

ENTERED INTO REST 1886. 

DEATH OF MRS. LOUISA V. HILL. 

On last Saturday afternoon, at the closing hours of the day, Mrs. Louisa 
V. Hill passed from death unto life eternal, in the eighty-fourth year of 
her age. Mrs. Hill was a remarkable woman for one of her years, and till 
the hour of her death she was in full possession of those keen, sharp facul- 
ties for which she had always been noted. Forty-nine years ago, with her 
husband and children, she came from Kentucky to this county and settled 
upon the farm where she spent her last days. Mrs. Hill's maiden name 
was Louisa V. Hickman. She was born in Madison county, Kentucky, on 
the 14th of December, 1802. Wheii she was but a child her parents 
removed to Payette county, where her childhood and the early years of her 
married life were spent. On the 20th of October, 1822, she was united in 
marriage to George L. Hill, of Fayette county, Kentucky, and in the same 
county three of her children were born. In March, 1828, they removed to 
Henry county, Kentuckj', and in the following November she was con- 
verted and united with the Baptist church. During the following nine 
years their five remaining children were born. On the 2d of October, 1837, 
they left Kentuckj^ for their new home in Illinois, and on the 19th of the 
same month they reached this county and settled on the farm where they 
have lived for nearly forty -nine years. 

Mrs. Hill was an earnest Christian woman, and in her home the present 
Baptist church of Clinton was organized on the 1st of February, 1839. 
During the following three years all the services of the church were held 
in their home. From the time of her conversion in November, 1828, till 
her death, Mrs. Hill was a faithful and consistent Christian. Her death, 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 153 

peaceful and calm, was but the triumph of a noble and useful life. The 
prayer of her life was for the salvation of those around her, and it was a 
gratification to her to know that all of her children and quite a number of 
her grandchildren have made a profession of religion. Mrs. Hill was a 
woman of positive convictions, and was always ready to express and defend 
what she considered to be the truth. 

Mrs. Hill was the mother of nine children, three of whom preceded her 
to the better land. She leaves her aged husband and six children to 
mourn the death of a loving wife and mother. Her surviving children are: 
Egbert O. Hill, of Ozark, Mo.; Lewis S. Hill, of Alexandria, Minn.; Mrs. 
Phebe L. Beatty, Mrs. Emily H. Weld, Rodney P. Hill and Benj. T. Hill. 
Among her descendants are thirty grandchildren and twelve great-grand- 
children. 

George L. Hill died the 30tli of November, 1887, when the fol- 
lowing obituary notice appeared in a paper published at Clinton, 
De Witt county, 111. : 

SKETCH OF GEORGE L. HILL, 

ONE OF THE PIONEERS OF DE WITT COUNTY. 

George L. Hill was born January 12, 1797, in Caroline county, Virginia, 
near Fredericksburg. He was left fatherless at the age of twelve years, 
and with his widowed mother moved to Kentucky in 1815, and there took 
charge of her business, at the age of eighteen years. He then rented land 
of Lewis Hickman, whose daughter, Louisa V., he married October 20, 
1822. While a renter in Fayette county there were born to them three 
children, Egbert O., Phebe L. and Sarah L. In the year 1827 he returned 
to Henry county, Kentucky, where the remaining five children were born, 
Lewis S., John H., Emily H., Rodney P, and Benjamin T. In the year 
1828 he professed religion, and with his wife joined the Baptist church 
at New Castle. 



Louisa Verona Hickman and George L. Hill had nine children, 



VIZ. : 



G 1. Capt. Egbert Osweld Hill, was born in 1823, graduated at 
Harvard University, Mass. ; practices law at St. Joseph, Mo. He 
was captain of Company F, 31st Missouri Infantry, during the Civil 
war in the United States in 1861; was in several battles and was 
wounded in Vicksburg. He married, in 1848, Mary L. Scott, by 
whom he had one daughter. After the death of his first wife, he 
married, in 1864, Bettie T. Scott. His children were : 

H 1. Julia L., by his first wife, born in 1849. 

H 2, Pauline Louisa, born 1867, etc. 

G 2. Phebe Laurinda Hill, daughter of Louisa V. and George 
L., was born in 1824. She is a member of the Baptist church, and 



154 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

has been twice married. In 1847 she married John D. Mahon, a 
merchant, and member of the Baptist church, by whom she had 
three children, all of whom died in infancy. John D. Mahon died 
1849. In 1853 Phebe L. married her second husband, Isaac B. 
Beatie, who was a saddler and harnessmaker and member of the 
Methodist church. They have children, viz. : 

H 1. George Hill, born 1854; married Nellie Morris in 1880. 

H 2. Mary Frances, born 1856; married James W. Coultas in 
1883. 

H 3. Thomas Otho, born 1858; married Frances A. Conklin in 
1881. 

Gr 3. Sarah Lewis, daughter of Louisa V. Hill, was born in 1826. 
She is a member of the Baptist church, and has been twice married. 
In 1850 she married Patrick V. M. Poole, a blacksmith by trade, by 
whom she had one daughter. After the death of Mr. Poole she 
married, in 1865, John Blaikie, by whom she had one child, and 
died in 1867. The names of her two children are, viz. : 

H 1. Sarah Elizabeth Poole, born in 1851. She is an artist, and 
has been married twice, fii'st to Mr. Megguier, second to Ed. J. 
Palmer, in 1888. 

H 2. Margaret Louisa Blaikie, born 1866; died in childhood. 

G 4. Lewis Samuel, son of Louisa V. Hill, was born in 1828. 
He is a farmer and member of the Baptist church. He was a 
soldier in the war of 1861, was a member of the 4th Regiment of 
Illinois Volunteers, and was wounded at Vicksburg, Miss. He 
married Ann Elizabeth Wray and has children, viz. : 

HI. Emma Eoline; H 2, Alice Elizabeth; H 3, Wm. Lesley;, 
H 4, Mary Louisa; H 5, George Lewis, and H 6, Minnie May. 

G 5. John Hart, son of Louisa V. Hill, was born in 1830, and 
died in 1851. 

G 6. Emily Hickman, daughter of Louisa V. Hill, was born in 
1832, and married Edwin Weld, a farmer, in 1855, by whom she 
has children, viz. : 

H 1. Ann, born 1856, and died 1862. 

H2. Carrie Hill, born 1858; married Gilbert C. Kelly in 1884 
He was chairman of the Board of Supervisors, and died of con- 
sumption in 1891. 

H 3. Minna Richards, born 1863; married J. E. Hartsock in 
1887. 

H 4. Emily Frances, born 1866. 

H 5. Edwin, Jr. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY, 155 

H 6. Katie. 

H 7. Nettie. 

G 7. Rodney Perry, son of Louisa V. Hill, was born in 1834, 
and married Ellen Reese in 1858. They are both members of the 
Baptist church and have children, viz. : 

H 1. Esther Ann, born 1858. 

H 2. Joseph Braxton, born 1860. 

H 3. Wm. Morgan, born 1863, etc. 

H 2. Margaret Louisa Blaikie, born 1866; died. 

Gr 8. Benjamin Thomas, son of Louisa V. Hill, was born in 1836. 
He is a farmer and member of the Baptist church; married in 1861 
Diana Reese, who was born in 1837. They have children as follows: 
I HI. Benjamin F., born 1864; H 2, Freddie Lincoln, born 1867, 
and died in 1868, etc. 

F 2. Laurinda Eastham, daughter of Lewis Hickman and his 
wife Sally F. Thompson, was born in 1804. She married John Bos- 
tick, in 1825; had one child and died in 1826. The name of her sou 
was: G 1, John Lewis Bostick, born 1826, and died 1826. 

F 3. Rosanna Brooking, daughter of Lewis Hickman, was born 
in 1805, and died in 1827. 

F 4. Emily Temple, daughter of Lewis Hickman, was born hi 
1806 ; married Paschal Mills, a farmer, both members of the Camp- 
bellite church. They have children as follows: 

G 1. Sarah Catharine, born 1838; married Richard Sweeny, and 
has three children, viz.: H 1, Emma Ann; H 2, Augustus; H 15, 
Laura. 

G 2. Paschal Hickman Mills, born 1840; married Winifred Arm- 
strong, and has children as follows: H 1, William; H 2, Mary; 
H 3, Minna, etc. 

G 3. Lucy Ann Mills, born 1842, and died 1842. 

F 5. Mary Byrd, daughter of Lewis Hickman, and his wife 
Sarah F. Thompson, was born in 1807; married Thomas J. Rogers; 
had three children, and died 1838, in De Witt county, 111. Her 
children are: G 1, Asa Braxton, married Barbara Ellen McPherson 
and has children; G 2, Martha Jane, was born in 1835; married 
David Mahon, and has children, and Gr 3, Orville Browning, born 
1838, and died 1839. 

F 6. Albert Henry, son of Lewis Hickman, and his wife Sarah, 
was bom in 1808; was a cabinet workman; married Harriet Grymes, 
had one son, and died in 1831. The name of his son is: Gr 1, 
Charles Lewis Grymes Hickman. He is married and has children. 



156 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

F 7. Rodney Elbridge, son of Lewis Hickman, was born in 
1809; was a blacksmith by trade; married Elizabeth Wallace, had 
three children and died in 1842. The following are the names of 
his children: Gr 1, David Wallace, born 1839; G 2, John Thomas, 
born 1841; married Jane McKinney; Gr 3, Hester Ann, born 1842, 
and died 1842. 

F 8. Braxton Lewis, son of Lewis Hickman, was born in 1810; 
married his third cousin, Nancy, daughter of Elliott Holladay. He 
was a blacksmith by trade; had seven children, and died in 1868, at 
Ashley, Pike county. Mo. The following are the names of his chil- 
dren: Gr 1, Sarah; G 2, Ann; G 3, Marcellus; G 4, Rodney; G 5, 
David; G 6, Lewis, and G 7, Elliott. 

F 9. John Hart, son of Lewis Hickman, was born in 1811 ; married 
Rachel E. Giddings, in 1853; had two children, and died in 1860. The 
names of his children are: G 1, John Milton, and G 2, Sarah Lewis. 

F 10. lantha Clearmont, daughter of Lewis Hickman, born 1813, 
and died 1814. 

F 11, Paschal Prebble, son of Lewis Hickman, was born in 1814, 
and died in 1853, in De Witt county, 111. 

F 12. Llewellen Bloomfleld, son of Lewis Hickman, was born in 

1817. He was a tailor by trade, and was a member of the Presby- 
terian church. In 1835 he married Cyntha Ann Brown, a member 
of the Campbellite church. Their children are as follows: G 1, 
Wm. Jones, born 1851; G 2, John Llewellen, born 1852; G 3, Fan- 
nie Bell, born 1860; G 4, Warren, born 1863, etc. 

F 13. Susan Frances, daughter of Lewis Hickman, was born in 

1818. She was a member of the Baptist church, and was married 
to Samuel Duncan; had two children, and died in 1851. The names 
of her children, are: G 1, Lewis, and G 2, Lucretia. 

F 14. William Wallace, son of Lewis Hickman, was born in 
1820. He was twice married, first to Sarah A. Condiff, by whom 
he had five children. His second wife was Elvira Mintum, by whom 
he has children. Their names are as follows: G 1, Lewis; G 2, 
Henry; G 3, Ira; G 4, Theodore; G 5, Richard T. ; G 6, Sarah V. ; 
G 7, Nancy; G 8, James, etc. 

William Wallace was a lieutenant in the Federal Army — 41st 
Illinois Regiment — during the Confederate war of 1861, and was in 
the battles of Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, Shilo, Corinth, Matamora 
or Hatchie, etc. 

F 15. David Addenbrook, son of Lewis Hickman, born 1821, 
and died in 1824. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 157 

F 16. Sarah Melvina, daughter of Lewis Hickman, born 1822, 
and died single. 

F 17 and F 18, two sons born, and both died in childhood. 

E 4. Lucy, daughter of Rev. Henry Hickman, born in 1778. 
She was a member of the Baptist church; married Belain Posey 
Evans; had ten children, and died about 1838. The names of her 
children are as follows: 

F 1. Hickman Evans, married Mary Combs. 

F 2. Belain P. Evans, married Jane Spiers, and had four chil- 
dren, viz.: 

G 1. Lucy H. , married Albert G. Boggs, son of ex-Governor 
Boggs, of Missouri, and has children, viz.: H 1, Willis Henry; 
H 2, Sam Spiers ; H 3, Mary Frances, etc. 

F 3. Richard Evans, married Moriah Jughs. 

F 4. James L. Evans, married Elizabeth Hayden. 

F 5. Peter Evans, married Elizabeth Smith. 

F 6. John Evans, married Miss Ford. 

F 7. Wm. H. Evans, married Miss Dickson, 

F 8. Frances L., married James Banford. 

F 9. Mary, died single. 

F 8. Frances L. Evans, born April 10, 1809; married December 
18, 1827, James C. Banford, of Fayette county, Kentucky, and had 
issue, viz. : 

G 1. Wm. H. Banford, born November 13, 1833; married Laura 
Latham, in 1865. 

G 2. Elizabeth Frances, born September 28, 1834; married Cap- 
tain Wm. G. Kincaid, in 1854. 

G 3. Sallie Banford, born August 27, 1840. 

Issue of Elizabeth Frances Banford and Wm. G. Kincaid: 

H 1. Charles Euston, born May 18, 1855. He is a graduate of 
Centre College. He edited a paper for two years at Lawrenceburg, 
Ky., where he was elected City Judge, with jurisdiction over the 
county. 

He is a lawyer by profession, and acted as legislative corre- 
spondent for the Courier-Journal at the State capital for the sessions 
of 1879-80. In the spring of 1880 he was appointed State Railroad 
Commissioner, and afterward was a correspondent for the Courier- 
Journal in Cuba and the South, and later, city editor and then news 
editor of that paper. In September, 1883, he was appointed private 
secretary of Governor J. Proctor Knott. He was appointed a com- 
missioner to bring the remains of Joel T. Hart, the sculptor, from 



158 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Florence, Italy, to Frankfort, Ky., in 1884. He was Consular Agent 

of the United States at St. Helens, Lancashire, England, under the 

Cleveland Administration. 

The following item is copied from the Courier-Journal, April 8, 

1891: 

Washington, April 8, 1891. 

After a trial lasting more than two Aveeks, Judge Charles E. Kincaid 
to-night walked out of court a free man. The arguments were all finished 
and the case given to the jury about 4 o'clock this afternoon. An agree- 
ment was reached in less than an hour, but the court had adjourned for 
supper and the judge was sent for. At 6:37 o'clock a verdict was returned 
declaring the accused not guilty. Kincaid looked pale when the jury 
entered the court-room, but when the verdict was rendered his face flushed 
and an expression of pleasure came over it. Judge Kincaid shot and killed 
Congressman W. P. Taulbee on the steps of the Capitol about two years 
ago. The evidence showed that there had been great provocation, and that 
the killing was really done in self-defense. 

H 2. Edward Percival, son of Wm. G. Kincaid, born May 4, 
1857; died October 22, 1861. 

H 3. Fannie Lewis, born February 8, 1860; died 1861. 

H 4. Dr. Douglas Howard, born December 29, 1863. He grad- 
uated in medicine at Georgetown College, D. C, in 1891, and for 
awhile practiced medicine in AVashington City. He also held office 
under the Government; is now practicing at Danville, Ky. 

H 5. Mary Emily, born March 28, 1866; married Wm. R. Spald- 
ing, a merchant of Lebanon, Ky. , in September, 1891. 

H 6. Henry Temple, born June 25, 1871. 

H 7. Susan, born Januarj^ 4, 1875. 

H 8. Nellie, born November 17, 1879. 

Issue of Wm. H. Banford and Laura Latham: 

H 1. Sallie Latham, born February 20, 1866; married Rev. John 
T. Henderson, of Franklin, Ind., April 28, 1892. 

H 2. James Turner, born February 13, 1867. 

H 3. Frances May, born June 30, 1868; married Rev. William 
Luke Clark, of Bement, 111., March 26, 1891, and they have a 
daughter, Laura Marie Clark, born February 13, 1892. 

H 4. Henry Harris, born November 4, 1869. 

H 5. William, born March 1, 1871. 

H 6. Robert Latham, born May 8, 1873. 

H 7. Leslie, born February 6, 1876. 

E 5. Mary, daughter of Rev. Henry Hickman, born about 1780; 
died a young woman. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 159 

E 6. Richard, son of Rev. Henry Hickman, was born about 
1785. He married Susan Combs in 1812, had five children and both 
died in Saline county, Mo., in 185-1:. Their children were, viz.: 

F 1. Cuthbert Henry, born 1815. 

F 2. Dr. Lawson Bullitt, born 1816. 

F 3. Sarah Combs, born 1819. 

F 4. Fielding Alexander, born 1820, and 

F 5. Dr. Richard Wm. Lewis, born 1822. 

F 1. Cuthbert Henry Hickman, son of Richard and Susan 
Combs, born 1815, is a farmer and an elder in the Christian church. 
He resides near Cambridge, Saline county, Mo. In 1838 he mar- 
ried Elizabeth Grimes and had eleven children. All have blue eyes 
and fair skin. Their names are as follows: 

G 1. Child, born and died in 1839. 

G 2. Sarah Frances, born 18-10; is a Methodist. 

G 3. Sarah Mildred, born 1842; is a member of the Christian 
church; married in 1862, Laban J. Garrett, by whom she has chil- 
dren, viz.: H 1, Wm. Henry; H 2, Laban J. ; H 3, Susan Eliza- 
beth, etc. 

G 4. Mary Ellen, born 1843; is a member of the Christian 
church; married Charles H. White and has children, viz.: HI, 
Elizabeth Mildred, etc. 

G 5. Richard Wm. Lewis, born 1846; was a soldier in the Con- 
federate war of 1861; belonged to General Stirling Price's army in 
General Jo. Shelby's division. He was for a while General Shelby's 
bodj^-guard, and afterwards his advance-guard. 

G 6. James Logan, born 1848. 

G 7. Cuthbert Henry, born 1851. 

G 8. Elizabeth Virginia, born 1854, and died 1854. 

G 9. Martha Sydna, born 1856. 

G 10. Leslie Combs, born 1858. 

G 11. Leona Davis, born 1861. 

F 2. Dr. Lawson Bullitt, son of Richard Hickman and Susan 
Combs, was born in 1816. He graduated in medicine at Transyl- 
vania University, Lexington, Ky. He was a surgeon in the Con- 
federate Army and was taken prisoner at the surrender of Fort 
Donelson while waiting on both Northern and Southern soldiers. 
He married Georgiana Baylor, has children and resides at Elkton, 
Todd county, Ky. 

F 3. Sally Combs, daughter of Richard Hickman and Susan 
Combs, was born in 1819; married Jas. A. Logan; resided near 



160 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Dangerfleld, Titus county, Tex., where she died in 1856, leaving- 
children, viz. : 

Gr 1. Susan Elizabeth; G 2, Sarah Ann, married Ed. Truitt, of 
Texas; G 3, Lydia Ellen; Gr 4, William, was a soldier in the Con- 
federate war; was taken prisoner by the Federals, confined in the 
prison in Little Rock, Ark., where he died; G 5, Robert; G 6, Jay. 

F 4. Fielding Alexander, son of Richard Hickman and Susan 
Combs, was born in 1820; is a farmer, and married Agnes Pigg. 
They have no children 

F 5. Dr. Richard William Lewis, son of Richard Hickman and 
Susan Combs, was born in 1822. He graduated in medicine at 
Louisville, Ky. He is a member of the Christian church, and has 
been twice married. His first wife was Jane Hord ; his second was a 
Miss Kidwell from England. He has no children, and was a widower 
when last heard from, residing near Petra, Saline county. Mo. 

E 7. William L. Hickman, son of Rev. Henry and Phebe East- 
ham, was born about 1788. He was a cabinet workman by trade, 
and died at Winchester, Ky., in 1864. He married Sally Pearson. 
They had five children, viz. : 

F 1. Susan Moreah, Winchester, Clark county, Ky. 

F -2. Frances Levinia, married Robert Smith, and has seven chil- 
dren, viz. : 

G 1. William Hickman, married Bettie Kennedy, of Paris, Ky., 
and had two children, viz. : HI, Kennedy, and H 2, Morton. 

G 2. Bettie, daughter of Frances L. Smith, died. 

G 3. Phebe, died. 

G 4. Lewis. 

G 5. Susan, married Leigh Bullard, of_Chancellorville, Va. 

G 6. James P. 

G 7. Charles Taliaferro. 

F 3. Lucy Elizabeth, married John Taliaferro, and had chil- 
dren, viz. : 

G 1. Sarah, married Joseph V. Morton, and has children, viz. : 
H 1, John Taliaferro, died; H 2, Wm. Hickman, married Susie Van 
Lear; H 3, Joseph V., died; H 4, Fannie McR. , married Walter Jack- 
son, of Shreveport, La. ; H 5, Thomas McP., and H 6, Charles Hay. 

G 2. John Taliaferro, died. 

John Taliaferro married Lucy Elizabeth Hickman ; is a son of 
Hay Taliaferro and grandson of Wm. Taliaferro, of Caroline 
county, Va. 

G 3. Bettie, daughter of Lucy E. Taliaferro, married Judge 



GEXEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 161 

Wm. M. Beckner, one of the foremost men of Kentucky. He was 
at one time Railroad Commissioner, Prison Commissioner, and was a 
delegate to the convention that formed the new Constitution of 
Kentucky, etc. They have six children, viz. : Hi, Lucian P. ; H 2, 
Seel Shackleford; H 3, Nancy West; H 4, John Taliaferro; H 5, 
Phebe H., and H 6, Wm. Hickman. 

Gr 4. Lucy Aylett, daughter of Lucy E, and John Taliaferro, 
married Dr. Isaac H. McKinley, and has three children, viz. : H 1, 
Susan H. ; H 2, David H., and H 3, Margaret Aylett. 

F 4. William, was the fourth child of William L. Hickman and 
Sally Pearson. He lived with his father at Winchester. His father 
was quite old and afflicted, and was confined to his bed. William, 
his son, while sitting by the bedside and waiting on his sick father 
was arrested in 1861 by a body of Federal soldiers for being a 
rebel sympathizer. They carried him to Lexington, Ky., where 
they confined him in prison. While there Capt. Robert Hickman, 
his cousin, in the Federal service, visited him — seemed to exhibit all 
the friendship possible for his cousin— offered to shake hands with 
him; but William scorned to take his hand, and with great indigna- 
tion and wrath replied that "he would not touch the hand of a 
man who was engaged in helping to murder and rob the people of 
the South of their rights and property. ' ' After he was released from 
prison he joined the Confederate Army; did good ser\ice in it, and 
earned quite a reputation among his comrades as a faithful and 
brave soldier. He now resides at St. Louis, Mo. 

F 5. Nancy Lewis, the j^oungest child of AVilliam L. Hickman 
and Sally Pearson. 

E 8. Fanny Lawson, daughter of Rev. Henry Hickman and his 
wife, Phebe Eastham, was born about 1797. She never married; 
is a pious member of the Baptist church, residing near Lexington, 
Fayette county, Ky. 

D 5. Eleanor, daughter of Hannah Lewis and her husband, 
James Hickman, was born in Virginia, in 1756. She married 
Joseph Hill, of Virginia; moved to Fayette county, Kentucky, 
where Mr. Hill died some years afterward. After the death of 
Joseph Hill she and her children all moved to Illinois — some of 
them settled in Christian county and others in Sangamon county, 
Illinois. In 1827, while on a visit to her sister, Hannah Hill, of 
Darbyville, 0. , Eleanor Hill died, and was buried on Darby' s Creek, 
near Darbyville, 0. She raised onl}' three children, viz. : 

E 1. Lieutenant James Hickman Hill, born 1779. 
11 



162 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

E 2. Elizabeth Hill, born 1781. 

E 3. Nancy Lewis Hill, born 1783. 

E 1. Lieutenant James H. Hill never married. He was a soldier 
in the war of 1812; served under Captain Combs as a lieutenant in 
a company from Clark county, Kentucky, and was in the battle of 
Thames, under Colonel Richard M. Johnson. He died in Pickaway 
county, Ohio, in 1830, and was buried near Darby ville, 0. 

E 2. Elizabeth Hill, was born in 1781. She was twice married; 
first to James Haley, by whom she had five children. James Haley 
died in Fayette county, Kentucky, in 1830, after which Elizabeth, his 
widow, married John P. Hill, her cousin, son of Hannah and 
George Hill. She died in Christian county, Illinois, in 1854, and 
was buried at the Bear Creek grave-yard. She was a pious member 
of the Christian church. The following are the names of her 
children and grandchildren: 

F 1. Nancy Lewis Haley, married Leroy Lewis Hill. 

F 2. Paulina T. Haley, married James Bennett. 

F 3. Joseph Haley, married Nancy Elliott. 

F 4. Elizabeth Haley, married Rob. McCondie and Wm. Singer. 

F 5. Woodson Haley. 

F I. Nancy Lewis Haley, married Leroy Lewis Hill, son of 
George Jind Hannah Hill, of Darby ville, O. , and resides at Spring- 
field, Sangamon county. 111. They have children, viz. : 

G 1. Ellen F., married Dr. George Ambrose, son of Mrs. Han- 
nah and Rev. George Ambrose, of Darbyville, 0. They reside in 
Oregon, and have children, viz. : HI, Georgiana, etc. 

G 2. Ormazinda Hill, married Mr. Twist, and has children, viz. : 
H 1, Tillie Florence, etc. 

G 3. Jas. F. Hill; G 4, Willis A. Hill; G 5, Leroy W. Hill; G 6, 
Edwin T. Hill, etc. 

F 2. Paulina T. Haley, married James Bennett, and had chil- 
dren, viz. : G 1, James; G 2, Catharine D., married Ben F. Maupin, 
and has children, viz. ; HI, Willis J. ; H 2, George A., etc. 

F 3. Joseph Haley, married Nancy Elliott, and has children, viz. : 

G 1. Mary Frances; G 2, James W. ; G 3, Lewis C. ; G 4, 
Elizabeth; G 5, Willis; G 6, Nancy J.; G 7, Benjamin; G 8, 
Paulina C. 

F 4. Elizabeth Haley, married Robert McCondie and Wm. Sin- 
ger. They reside near Taylorsville, Christian county, 111. Robert 
McCondie died near Springfield, Sangamon county. 111., in 1844. 
He was a Justice of the Peace and Elder in the Christian church at 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 163 

the time of his death. She had one child by her first husband and 
three by her second, \\z. : 

Gr 1. Margaret McCondie; G 2, Paulina Singer; Gr 3, Elizabeth 
Singer, died; G 4, William Singer, died. 

E 3. Nancy Lewis Hill, daughter of Eleanor and Joseph, was 
born 1783; married John Hale}^, brother of James, who married 
Elizabeth Hill. John Haley died in Kentucky, and Nancy L. , his wife, 
died in Sangamon count}', Illinois. They raised four children, viz. : 

F 1. Paulina Haley, married Silas P. Hill, son of Hannah and 
Oeorge Hill. She died in Christian county, Illinois, leaving no 
children. 

F 2. Lucinda Haley, married Bartlett Haley, and has children, 
viz.: G 1, Angeline, married Jo. Mathews; G 2, James; G 3, 
Frank, married a Miss Harper; G 4, AYilliam; G 5, Mary; G 6, 
Newton, etc. 

D 6. General Richard Hickman, son of James and his wife, Han- 
nah Lewis, was born in Culpeper county, Virginia, in 1757, and was 
a Revolutionary soldier. He emigrated from Virginia to Kentucky 
with his father and others of the Hickman family to what is now 
Clark county. He was a farmer by occupation, with a mind far 
above mediocrity ; having been raised in the colony of Virginia at a 
time when there were but few schools in the country, it could not 
be expected that his education was very thorough ; notwithstanding, 
he was called from his plowhandles by the citizens of his county 
and elected as a member of the convention that formed the Con- 
stitution of Kentucky in 1799. He served his country over twenty 
years as Senator in the Kentucky Legislature. He was elected 
Lieutenant-Governor of Kentucky, and during this official term the 
war of 1812 occurred. The Legislature requested Governor Isaac 
Shelby to take the field in person against the Indians and command 
the troops of the State, which order he obeyed. During the absence of 
Governor Shelby on the military expedition, General Richard Hick- 
man acted as Governor of the State. Hickman county in Ken- 
tucky was named in honor of General Richard Hickman. In 1787 
General Richard Hickman married Lydia, the widow of Christopher 
Irvine, whose maiden name was Lydia Callowa}', daughter of Colonel 
Calloway, who was killed by the Indians. 

[Extract from Wheeler's History of North Carolina, page 446.] 

In December the Indians made furious assaults upon this fort (where 

Boonesboro now stands), by which Boone lost one man killed and another 

wounded ; but the Indians were repulsed with great slaughter. This 

■defeat was so severe that the Indians treacherously appeared reconciled, 



164 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

and seemed to give up all ideas of assaulting tlie fort or molesting the 
■whites. This caused the inhabitants of the fort to be less guarded, and 
they made frequent visits and excursions into the forest around. On the 
14th of July, 1776 (just seven months from their last attack), as three- 
young ladies — two daughters of Col. Calloway (Lydia and Elizabeth) and 
the third, of Colonel Boone — were leisurely strolling in the woods, they 
were pursued by the Indians and caught before they could reach the gates 
of the fort. At this moment Boone was off hunting, but when he returned, 
without any aid he followed alone the tracks of the Indians. He knew 
that if he waited to collect force the cunning robbers would be entirely' 
bej'ond pursuit. With a sagacity peculiar to hunters, he followed their 
trail without the least deviation, while the girls had the presence of mind 
to snap off small twigs, from time to time, as they passed through the 
shrubbery on their route. At last he came in sight of them, and b}- the 
aid of his unerring rifle killed two of the Indians and recovered these 
young ladies, and reached the fort safely. One of these, Elizabeth Callo- 
way, married Samuel Henderson, the brother of Judge Henderson and 
Major Pleasant Henderson. This romantic incident afforded Mr. Cooper,, 
in his "Last of the Mohicans," an incident in his tale. 

The above account of the Misses Calloway and Miss Boone may 
also be found in Lippincott's Cabinet History of Kentucky, by 
Arthur and Carpenter on page 35 ; and also in Border Wars, page 
256, etc. 

General Kichard Hickman married, as above stated, Lydia Callo- 
way one of the three young ladies that were stolen by the Indians, 
by whom he raised five children, and died in Clark county, Ken- 
tucky, in 1832. His children were: 

E 1. Captain Llewellen, born in 1788; married Agnes St. Cyr. 

E 2. Elizabeth, born in 1790; married John L. Hickman. 

E 3. Catharine, born in 1797; married General Wm. Prewitt. 

E 4. Matilda, born in 1801 ; married Hon. Sam Hanson. 

E 5. Caroline, born in 1803; married David K. Pitman. 

E 1. Captain Llewellen Hickman, was an officer in the regular 
army during the war of 1812. He was stationed at Prairie du 
Chien, on the Mississippi river. He married Agnes St. Cyr, a 
French lady, of St. Louis, Mo., by whom he raised one son, and 
died in St. Louis, Mo. The name of his son is: 

F 1. Llewellen St. Cyr Hickman. He married and is living in 
St. Charles, Mo. 

E 2. Elizabeth Hickman, daughter of Gen. Kichard, was born in 
1790; married her cousin, John Lewis Hickman, son of David and 
his wife, Clara McClanahan; raised eight children, and died in 
Paris, Bourbon county, Ky., 1833. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 165 

For further information relative to Elizabeth Hickman and her 
husband, John Lewis Hickman, and their posterity, the reader is 
referred to John L. Hickman, third child of David and his wife, 
Clara McClanahan, on another page of this w'ork. 

E 3. Catharine, daughter of Gen. Richard Hickman, was born 
1797. She married General Wm. Prewitt, a farmer, of Fayette 
county, Kentucky, and is now a widow with two sons, viz. : 

F 1. Richard Hickman, born 1833. 

F 2. David, born 1838. 

F 1. Richard H. , is a graduate of Bethany College, Virginia, 
and also graduated in the Law Class in Louisville, Ky., and in 
1857 was engaged in the practice of his profession in Lexington, 

Ky. 

F 2. David, was a soldier in the Confederate service under the 
command of General John H. Morgan. He survived the war and 
is now married. 

OBITUARY. 

Died on the 11th daj' of July, 1878, at her home, the residence of her 
son, R. H. Prewitt, Esq., in Clark county, Mrs. Kitty Prewitt, relict of 
Gen. Wm. C. Prewitt, in the 82d year of her age. 

She survived her husband many years, and died on the forty-sixth anni- 
versary of their marriage. The deceased was a daughter of Gen. Richard 
Hickman, of Clark county, and long survived his other children. She was a 
native of Clark county and always resided there or in Fayette, and never 
more than ten miles from the place of her birth. She was a true type of 
a Kentucky matron of the old school, distinguished alike for the kindness 
of her disposition, and the firmness, integrity and purity of her character; 
gentle and dignified in her bearing, plain, open and unostentatiousjn her 
manners, she inspired the confidence and respect of all with whom she 
came in contact. 

More than half a century before her death she made an open profession 
of her faith in Christ, and became a member of the Christian church at 
old Mt. Zion, in the neighborhood in which she lived, and was a faithful, 
pious, devoted and exemplary Christian. 

She was gifted with a mind of uncommon strength, improved by read- 
ing, reflection and thought. She was always the center of a gentle and 
happy influence in the social circle; quiet and unobtrusive, candid and 
true. She loved truth for its own sake, and utterly despised all sham, 
whether in morals, politics, religion or anywhere. 

Filled with womanly sympathy and affection, calm and equable in tem- 
perament, wise, discreet and judicious, she was ever the true and sympa- 
thizing friend, the reliable, considerate and trusted counselor of her 
family and friends. The writer has never met with any one whose charac- 
ter combined more of the virtues and graces that adorn the woman and 
the Christian. Her unfaltering faith in the precious promises of the 



166 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Saviour, which enabled her to meet and bear with cheerfulness the trials, 
the troubles, the afflictions — bodily and mental — of a long life, was indeed 
beautiful. The serene resignation with which she contemplated her disso- 
lution, is a priceless consolation to her kindred and friends in this great 
bereavement. 

She is gone to another and better world, but the example of her beau- 
tiful life remains to bless mankind, and its silent influence will be felt by 
those yet unborn. 

E 4. Matilda, daughter of General Richard Hickman, was born in 
1801. She married, in 1818, Hon. Samuel Hanson; had fourteen 
children, and died in Winchester, Clark county, Ky., in 1847. 
Samuel Hanson was a very distinguished lawyer, was raised about 
Washington City, and died at Winchester, Clark county, Ky. , in 
1858. We clip the following notice and obituary: 

[ From the Lexington Observer and Republican, 1858.] 
Death has claimed as its victim another of Kentuckj''s most dis- 
tinguished citizens. Samuel Hanson, Esq., of the county of Clark, is no 
more. He died after a long protracted illness at his residence in the town 
of Winchester, on Saturday morning last at 8:30 o'clock. 

Samuel Hanson was no ordinary man; indeed he was in every sense of 
the term an extraordinary man. Nature had dealt lavishly with him, and 
her gifts had been nurtured and cultivated with great assiduity. Born in 
the city of Alexandria, then in the District of Columbia, he received the 
benefits of a superior scholastic and legal education, and at an early age 
exhibited promises of the ability and usefulness which characterized his 
subsequent career. He left the District about fifty years ago, in company 
with Mr. Clay, then a member of the National Legislature, for Kentucky, 
and, after a brief residence in other sections of the State, located in the 
county in which he died, and for upwards of forty years has been regarded 
by its citizens with the respect, esteem and confidence which are always 
the attendants of a life of public usefulness and of private worth. 

But the fame of Samuel Hanson was not alone confined to the county 
in which he lived, or its immediate vicinity. He was extensively and 
favorably known throughout the Commonwealth, and his name will long 
be remembered and revered by hosts of true-hearted friends in every sec- 
tion of the State. His fine scholarly attainments, great legal learning and 
superior natural abilities placed him in the front rank of statesmen and 
jurists in Kentucky, and commanded for him a position and a reputation 
of which any man might be justly proud. He was always a firm and con- 
sistent Whig, repeatedly represented his county in both branches of the 
Legislature, and at one time filled the office of Speaker of the Senate with 
great credit and distinction. The records of the Legislature for years bear 
the impress of his masterly genius and the conservative principles which 
marked his whole political history ; and few survive him who have ex- 
erted a more potent influence upon the policy of the State during the 
stormiest periods of her political history. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 16T 

But it was not alone in his public capacity that Samuel Hanson was 
distinguished. In ali his private relations, like the illustrious Bayard, he 
was, "without fear and without reproach." A kind and indulgent hus- 
band and father, a faithful counselor and a steadfast friend, he will be 
remembered as the man who fulfilled his every duty to those connected 
with him by the most endearing ties. 

But eulogy in regard to such a man soon exhausts itself, and we close 
this brief and imperfect tribute to an old and valued friend, by directing 
attention to an obituary in another part of our paper by a distinguished 
contemporary of the illustrious dead. 

The following are the names of the children of Matilda and Sam. 
Hanson, Esq., marked F: 

F 1. Richard Hickman, is a lawyer by profession, with fine 
talents and legal attainments; has represented Bourbon county in 
the Legislature. He married Eveline Talbott, resides in Paris, 
Bourbon county, Ky., and has issue, viz. : 

G 1. Charles T., a lawyer at Paris, Ky. 

Gr 2. B. H. Hanson, Jr., of Paris, Ky. 

G 3. Jennie M., Paris, Ky. 

Gr 4. Samuel, Paris, Ky. 

F 2. Sarah C. , daughter of Sam. Hanson, of Leavenworth, Kan. 

F 3. Matilda B. Hanson, married Captain Jas. Stone, who served 
in the Mexican war as captain of an infantry company with much 
credit, and is now a farmer near Leavenworth, Kan. They have 
children, viz. : G 1, Samuel H. ; G 2, Bobert C. ; G 3, James, etc. 

F 4. Lydia C. , daughter of Sam. Hanson, resides at Leaven- 
worth, Kan. 

F 5 and 6, Eliza Ann and Caroline F., died in childhood. 

F 7. Thomas L. Hanson, died single. 

F 8. Mary K., married Mr. Gladding and resides at Leaven- 
worth, Kan. 

F 9. Ellen Lucretia, married Major Charles W. Helm, who was 
a soldier in the Confederate war. He was a captain at first but was 
soon promoted for his gallantry to the office of major under Gen- 
eral Roger W. Hanson, his brother-in-law. 

Major Helm died in 1888, when the following obituary appeared 
in a Dallas, Tex., paper: 

DEATH OF MAJOR HELM, 1888. 

A PROMINENT CITIZEN AND A MAN OF MARK GONE. 

The announcement of the death of Major Charles W. Helm, which 
occurred this morning at 1 o'clock at the family residence, No. 937 Wood 



168 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Street, was received with feelings of general regret. Many did not think 
him so low as until the past few days of his illness he continued to come 
down to his oflBce. Finally his strength became so exhausted that he was 
confined to his bed until he breathed his last. He possessed all the noble 
qualities that went to make the man ; was kind, considerate and generous. 
He was a man that made friends and kept them. 

The funeral will take place from the residence at 10 o'clock to-morrow 
morning. The major had a severe attack of fever last summer from which 
he never fully recovered. He appeared to mend for a time and his friends 
thought he would regain his health, but he began to decline and gradually 
grew worse until the last. 

The lamented was born the 16th day of July, 1834. His full name was 
Charles Warfield Helm, and he graduated with honors at the University of 
Virginia at the age of twenty-three. 

Mrs. Ellen L. Helm resides in Dallas, Tex. , and has children, viz. : 

Gr 1. Virgie A., married Mr. Keed, of Dallas, and has one child, 
viz. : H 1, Carl Hanson. 

G 2. Erasmus, resides in Leavenworth, Kan. 

Gr 3. Matilda Stone, married and is living in Texarkana, Ark. 

G 4. James Stone. 

G 5. Roger Hanson. 

F 10. General Roger Weightman, son of Sam. Hanson, was a 
lawyer by profession. He was a lieutenant under Captain "Williams 
in the Mexican war; was a general in the Confederate war of 1861, 
and was mortally wounded at Stone River, near Murfreesboro, Tenn., 
in Januaiy, 1863. He married Virginia Peters in 1853, but left no 
children. We clip the following from the 3Iissmippian : 

GENERAL ROGER W. HANSON. 

[For the Mississippian.] 

Roger Weightman Hanson was a son of Samuel Hanson, Esq., a dis- 
tinguished lawyer of Clark county, Kentucky. His mother (Matilda) was 
the daughter of General Richard Hickman, of the same county. 

Roger W. was born about the year 1827. His life has been an eventful 
one. At eighteen years of age he was elected lieutenant in a volunteer 
company raised in Clark county, Kentucky, for the Mexican war. He 
distinguished himself by his bravery in the battle of Cerro Gordo and other 
places daring said war. 

AYhile attending a law class in Lexington, Ky., he was forced into a duel, 
when he received a shot above the knee, breaking the bone badly and 
laming him for life. During this aifair of honor he acted with the utmost 
coolness and deliberation. 

As soon as he recovered from his w^ound he set out with the then emi- 
grating tide for California. During his journey there he underwent many 
privations and hardships — losing his horse on the way, he walked the last 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 169 

two hundri'd miles with a stiff knee. On his arrival in San Francisco — 
broken down with travel, hungry, without means — he spent his first night 
under a board shelter. But the urbanity of his manners and suavity of 
his address soon made him friends and secured him employment. He 
remained in California but a short time, returning to his native State the 
ensuing spring. 

In 1853 he married Miss Virginia Peters, of Woodford county, Kentucky. 

In 1854 he located in Lexington to practice his profession, when he soon 
rose to eminence as a lawyer. Within a few years he was elected by his 
county to represent them in the State Legislature. Soon afterward he was 
appointed as one of the Presidential electors for the State of Kentucky, 
after which he was nominated as a candidate for a seat in the United 
States Congress, but was defeated by James B. Claj'. 

In 18G1 when the Southern States seceded from the United States he 
espoused the cause of the South, raised a regiment in Kentucky and joined 
the Confederacy, resolved to sink or swim with her. He was taken 
prisoner at Fort Donelson, where he commanded the 2d Kentucky Regi- 
ment, of Breckinridge's brigade. General S. B. Buckner, in his report of 
the surrender of Fort Donelson, remarked that — " I can not close this report 
without calling special attention to the gallant and able conduct of my 
brigade commanders, Colonel R. W. Hanson and others." 

After he was exchanged, his Kentucky friends in the South made up a 
purse of five hundred dollars, purchased a splendid war horse which they 
presented to him on his arrival as a token of their esteem for his distin- 
guished heroism and moral worth. He was afterward promoted to the 
ottice of Brigadier-General and consigned to a command in Breckinridge's 
division of Bragg's army. He was in the battle of Hartsville and took an 
active part. in all the principal fighting up to the 2d day of January, 1863, 
when he fell upon the battle-field, mortally wounded, at Murfreesboro 
Avhilst gallantly leading his brigade, unfaltering amidst an enfiladed hail- 
storm of shot and shell, upon the bloodiest and hottest contested portion of 
the battle field. He expired soon after the army retreated from Murfrees- 
boro. In his death Kentuck}- has lost one of her noblest and bravest sons, 
and the Confederacy one of her intrepid and gallant officers. 

Louisville, Miss., February 7, 18G3. Wm. T. Lewis. 

[From Louisville Courier- Journal, 1861.] 

Louisville, August 14. 
Roger Hanson, heretofore classed as a quasi-submissionist, spoke at 
Lexington, denouncing the war, saying Southerners would lose their slaves, 
burn their cotton and sink their plantation, but never yield. 

[From American Rural Home.] 
Mrs. Virginia Hanson, widow of Colonel Roger Hanson killed in the 
war, has been re-elected State Librarian by the Kentuck.y Legislature. 
This is her third term, and it is said the State never had a better librarian. 

The remains of General Hanson were buried in Tennessee, but 
in the fall of 1866 his widow had his body removed from Tennessee 



170 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

to Lexington, Ky. , where it was re-interred iu the cemetery with au 
the honors due so gallant a soldier and the cause for which he 
died. 

[For the Sunday Advertiser and Register.] 
THE MARTYRS OF THE SOUTH. 

BY A. B. MEEK. 

" I am willing to die with such a wound received in so glorious a cause."" 
■ — General Hanson's last words. 

Oh, weep not for the gallant hearts 

Who fell in battle's day ; 
They well performed their hero parts, 

And passed from earth away. 
They lie asleep on honor's bed — 

Young Freedom's martyr band — 
For all that's dear to man they bled — 

For God and native land. 

Weep not for Jackson, who laid down 

His life in fullest fame; 
Who always wore the victor's crown, 

Now wears a deathless name. 
O ! what a loss that day was ours. 

When that great light grew dim ; 
We weep amid our darkened bowers. 

But do not weep for him. 

For Sidney Johnston— whose high worth 

Was Freedom's polar star — 
Who, like Elijah, passed from earth 

In battle's fiery car. 
Shed not a tear— Ae is not dead — 

But UP from Shiloh gone ! 
Where wreaths ambrosial deck his head. 

Beside great Washington. 

Weep not for Garnett, his young brow 

Among the earliest paled ; 
Though death compelled his form to bow. 

His spirit never quailed. 
Among Virginia's mountain heights, 

With Garland by his side, 
And Starke— they fought for ravished rights. 

And for their country died. 

Oh, for McCulloch, do not weep— 

The Marion of the West — 
Nor for Bartow, nor Bee — but keep 

Their memories in the breast. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 171 

They realized man's noblest fate — 

la victory's lap to lie — 
We all must die, or soon or late — 

How blest like them to die ! 

Fair Mississippi's stalwart chief — 

Brave Barksdale, too, has gone, 
And Zollicoffer's life too brief. 

And Green — and brave Mouton. 
Kentucky's Hanson slumbers low, 

With Helm and Branch as well ; 
Pour not for them the stream of \vo& 

With angels now they dwell. 

A curse upon the felon foe — 

Freebooters of the West — 
Who hurled their red assassin blow 

On gallant Gladden's breast. 
Gregg, Griffith, Tilghman, Seymour, Cobb, 

Now live with him in death ; 
The gaunt hyenas can not rob 

The grave of its green wreath. 

For Alabama's own loved dead. 

Though humbler be their names. 
Why should the selfish tear be shed? 

They now are God's and fame's. 
Rest Irby, Webb, Jones, Hobbs and Hale, 

Rest Jewett, Summers, Moore, 
Inge, Garrett, Loma.v, Pelham, Baine, 

On death's triumphant shore. 

What stars crowd out upon the sky, 

Of history, as I write ! 
Would I could number them on high, 

The planets of our night. 
They live immortal, and for them 

We need not drop the tear ; 
Each wears a golden diadem 

In a celestial sphere. 

But we must weep — aye deeply mourn 

For our ownselves bereft, 
The priesthood from our altars torn. 

Our homes in darkness left. 
The widowed and the orphan band — 

On fate's rude waters tost — 
Weep for the anguish-stricken land 

That such great souls has lost. 



172 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

F 11. Colonel Charles S. Hanson, son of Sam,, is a lawyer by 
profession. He was a Colonel in the Federal service, and received 
a slight wound in a skirmish at Saltville, Va. ; was taken prisoner. 
He married Carrie Wheeler, of Winchester, Ky. He died in Paris, 
Ky., from the eflfects of the wound received in battle. He left one 
daughter, viz. : G 1, Carrie Louisa, who married Wm, K. Thomas. 
She resides a widow at Paris, Ky. , with two children, viz.: H 1, 
Sarah, and H 2, Charles. 

F 12. Sam. K, Hanson, Jr., died in the Federal service from 
sickness. 

F 13. Isaac S. Hanson, son of Sam., was a soldier in the Con- 
federate service ; was taken prisoner at the battle of Fort Donelson 
with his brother. General Roger W. He survived the conflict, but 
died soon afterward. 

p] 5. Caroline, daughter of General Rich, Hickman, was born 
1803. She married David K. Pitman, had one son and died in St. 
Charles county, Missouri. The name of her son is: F 1, Richard 
Hickman, He is married. 

D 7. Captain James L. Hickman, son of James and his wife 
Hannah Lewis, was a Revolutionary soldier and was born in 1759 in 
Culpeper county, Virginia. He married Elizabeth Bryan, raised 
nine children and died in Lincoln county, Kentucky, in 1828. 
After his death his widow and several of his children moved to 
Platte county, Missouri. The following are the names of his 
children : 

E 1. William B. , born 1795; married Sarah Bronaugh. 

E 2. Nancy Lewis, born 1800; married Jas. Tinsley. 

E 3, Mary, born 1802; married Sam, Engleman. 

E 4. Henry Terrell, born 1804; married Elizabeth Logan. 

E 5, Elizabeth, born 1806; married Simeon Engleman. 

E 6. Amelia, born 1808; married John M, Shackleford. 

E 7. Lucinda, born 1810; married Joel F. Hickman. 

E 8. James P., born 1812; married Polly Bronaugh, 

E 9. Louisa, born 1814; married Thos, J. Thurman. 

E 1, William B., son of James L. Hickman, born 1795; married 
Sarah Bronaugh, a half-sister of Polly Bronaugh, the wife of James 
P. Hickman. Wm. B. weighed about two hundred pounds, with 
blue eyes. He died in Lincoln county, Kentucky, in 1832, and 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 173 

his wife in 1845. The following is the inscription on his tomb- 
stone : 



SACRED TO THE MEMORY 

— OF — 

WILLIAM B. HICKMAN, 

Who was born July 11, 1795. 
Son of James and Betsy Hickman. 
Was married to Sallie Bronaugh, daughter 
of Wm. and Lucy Bronaugh, on the 14th of 
August, 1813, and departed this Ufe Decem- 
ber 13, 1832, leaving behind him his widow 
with eight children to lament their loss. 



The following are the names of the children and some of the 
grandchildren of William B. and Sarah Hickman, his first wife. He 

had no children by Miss Tinslej', his second wife. The names 

of his children are as follows : 

F 1. Thomas B. , born 1814; is six feet two inches high, weigh- 
ing one hundred and seventy-five pounds, with blue eyes and fair 
skin; is a farmer residing near Red Blufl^, Cal. He married Margaret 
Culbertson, daughter of David and his wife, Sally Bright. He left 
Kentucky in 1839 and settled in California, The following are the 
names of his seven children: Gr 1, Thos. Jefl'erson; G 2, Sarah E. ; 
G 3, Mary K. ; G 4, Gholson S. ; G 5, Eliza T. ; G 6, Elijah H., and 
G 7, Drucilla. 

F 2. Elizabeth B., daughter of Wm. B. Hickman and Sarah, 
was born 1818; married Jacob Engleman, her cousin, son of Sam. 
and Mary. She had eight children and died in Missouri in 1867. 
Her children were, viz. : G 1, Mary Ann; G 2, John H. ; G 3, James; 
G 4, Simeon; G 5, Robert; G 6, Betsy; G 7, Wallace, and G 8, 
William. 

F 3. Mary, daughter of Wm. B. and Sarah Hickman, was born 
1820; married Isham Gilbert and died in Missouri in 1855, leaving 
three children, viz.: G 1, Martha Ann; G 2, Sarah C, and G 3, a 
daughter. 

F 4. Robert L., son of Wm. B. Hickman and Sarah Hickman^ 
born 1823. 

F 5. Sarah Ann, born 1825; married John Owens, had one child, 
viz. : G 1, Sarah. 

F 6. Lucy, daughter of Wm. B. and Sarah Hickman, was born 



174 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

1827; married Samuel Shackelford and Geo. W. Patterson and died 
in 1855, leaving three childi'en. 

F 7. Maria, daughter of Wm. B. and Sarah Hickman, born 1829; 
married Wm. A. Owens, by whom she had two children, viz.: 
G 1, Elizabeth and G 2, William. 

F 8. Catharine, daughter of Wm. B. and Sarah, was born 1832; 
married James Baxter, of Missouri, and has nine children. 

E 2. Nancy Lewis, daughter of James Hickman and his wife, 
Elizabeth Bryan, was born in 1798. For over thirty years she was 
a devoted member of the Christian church, and died in Cole county, 
Missouri, in 1868, in full faith of a blissful immortality bej^ond the 
grave. She married James Tinsley, a soldier of 1812, who was at 
the battle of New Orleans, and died in Green count}^ Missouri, in 
1870, aged 80 years. They raised eleven children, viz. : 

F 1. James Hickman Tinsley, born about 1817; married Mary 
Dunlap, by whom he has children, viz.: G 1, Mary Elizabeth, etc. 

F 2. William Tinsley, born about 1818; died in Lincoln county, 
Kentucky, in 1845. 

F 3. Henry H. Tinsley, born about 1820; died in Polk county, 
Missouri, in 1869, from the effects of injuries of the head caused by 
blows received from Federal soldiers during the Confederate war of 
1861. 

F 4. Betsy Tinsley, born 1821; died in 1833. 

F 5. Amelia Tinsley, born 1823; married Dr. B. M. E. Smith, 
and died in Clay county, Missouri, in 1852, leaving two children, viz. : 
G 1, Mary L., and G 2, Edward A. 

F 6. Dr. Robert L. Tinsley, born 1825; was twice married; first 
to Ange Berry, by whom he had two children; she died in 1859. 
His second wife was Amanda A. Paschal, whom he married in 1866, 
and by whom he has children, viz. : G 1, William S. ; G 2, James H. ; 
G 3, Ange Lee, born 1867; G 4, Nancy Lewis, born 1869, etc. 

F 7. John F. Tinsley, born 1827; died in Lincoln county, Ken- 
tucky, in 1845. 

F 8. Mary L., born 1829; died in Clay county, Missouri, in 1848. 

F 9. David Anthony, born 1833; became a member of the Chris- 
tian church in 1855. In 1861 went as a captain under General 
Price; was in the battles of Oak Hills or Wilson's Creek, Lexing- 
ton, Pea Ridge, Corinth, Lone Jack, Independence, etc. At Lex- 
ington, General Stean offered to promote him, but his company was 
not willing for him to leave them. He was left at Independence 
sick of fevei", and lay concealed in the brush and thickets, where 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



175 



he received medical attention until he recovered, but still remained 
concealed in hopes of joining his command again ; was captured and 
placed on the cars as a prisoner for St. Louis ; jumped off the cars at 
night and made his escape, but was recaptured months afterward 
by Captain Wm. Fitzgerald, a home-guard, and murdered in 1863, 
Thus died a Christian, a true and brave soldier. 

F 10. Thomas B. Tinsley, was born in 1835; was murdered in 
Platte county, Missouri, in 1865, by Fitzgerald's party. 

F 11. Benjamin S. Tinsley, was born in 1840; was in the battles 
of Lexington, Pea Ridge, etc., during the Confederate war. He 
married Mary Gilbert in 1869. 

E 3. Mary, daughter of James Hickman and his wife, Betsy 
Bryan, was born about 1800. She married Samuel Engleman, 
brother of Simeon, by whom she had two children ; but raised only 
one. She died in Lincoln county, Kentucky, in 1819, where the 
following inscription on her tombstone may be found : 



IN MEMORY OF 

POLLY ENGLEMAN, 

Consort of Samuel Engleman, 

Daughter of Jas. Hickman and Betsy, his wife, 

Who was born the 8th of February, 1800, 
and departed this life the 31st of March, 1819. 
She left two children and an affectionate 
mother, a husband deprived of an endeared 
wife, fond parents deprived of one of the most 
dutiful children and numerous and respectable 
connections to deplore her loss. She lived be- 
loved and died lamented by all who knew her. 



She raised only one son, viz. : 

F 1. Jacob Engleman, born 1819; married his cousin, Betsy 
Hickman, daughter of Wm. B. and his wife, Sarah Bronaugh. For 
the names of his children the reader is referred to Betsy Hickman's 
children on another page of this book. 

E 4. Henry Terrell Hickman, son of James and his wife, Betsy 
Bryan, was born 1804; married Elizabeth Logan, raised one son 
and died in Lincoln county, Kentucky, in 1835. The name of his 
sou is: F 1, James, who resides at Warrensburg, Johnson county, 
Mo. He married Eliza Duncan, l^y whom he has six children, viz. : 
a 1, Mary; G 2, Laura; G 3, William; G 4, John; G 5, Annie, and 
G 6, Luther S. 



176 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



E 5. Elizabeth Hickman, daughter of James and his wife, Betsy 
Bryan, married Simeon Engleman, brother of Samuel. She lives in 
Boone county, Missouri, and has ten children, viz. : F 1, Mary; F 2, 
Elizabeth; F 3, John; F 4, Moriah; F 5, James W. ; F 6, Barbara; 
F 7, Simeon; F 8, Martha; F 9, Christian, and F 10, Sarah E. 

E 6. Amelia Hickman, daughter of James and his wife, Betsy 
Bryan, married John M. Shackelford and resides at Red Bluffs, Cal. 
They have nine or ten children. 

E 7. Lucinda Hickman, daughter of James and Betsy Bryan, 
married Joel F. Hickman, son of Joel and his wife, Frances Garetta 
Wilson. He died in Platte county, Missouri, in 1847, and his wife 
resides in Cameron, Clinton county. Mo. They had seven children 
viz. : F 1, John W. ; F 2, James; F 3, Elizabeth; F 4, Louisa; F 5, 
Maria; F 6, Mary; F 7, Martha A. 

E 8. James P. Hickman, sou of James and Betsy Bryan, married 
Polly Bronaugh, a half-sister of Sarah, the wife of Wm. B. Hickman, 
and died near Dallas, Dallas county, Tex., in 1879. They left 
seven children, viz.: F 1, Betsy; F 2, Mary Ann; F 3, Gholson; 
F 4, Henry; F 5, Louisa; F 6, Lydia Ann, and F 7, Clara, married 
a Mr. Terrell and resides near Weatherford, Parker county, Tex. 

E d. Louisa Hickman, daughter of James and Betsy Bryan, 
married Thomas J. Thurman and died in Lincoln county, Kentucky, 
in 1866, leaving one daughter, viz. : F 1, Bettie, married Dr. W. C. 
Swinny and lives in Green county, Missouri. She has children as 
follows: G 1, William; G 2, Louisa, etc. 

D 8. Joel Hickman, son of James and his wife, Hannah Lewis, 
was born in Culpeper county, Virginia, in 1761. He was a soldier 
of the Revolutionary war, and married, in 1786, Frances Garetta, 
daughter of Lieutenant John Wilson, who was killed at the battle 
of Eutaw Springs, S. C, in 1781. 

The following inscriptions of Joel Hickman and his wife, Frances 
Garetta, may be found in the Hickman graveyard in Clark county, 
Kentucky : 



IN MEMORY OP 

FRANCES GARETTA, 

Wife of Joel Hickman, 

Born March 3, 1768, 

Died May 23, 1847. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



177 



IN MEMORY OF 

JOEL HICKMAN, 

A soldier of the Revolution, 
Born in Culpeper Count}-, Virginia, 

August 10, 1761, 

Died in Clark County, Kentucky, 

July 16, 1852. 



[From " Scraps of Poetry and Prose " by Ed. C. Hickman.] 
He stood an oak among the forest trees, 
Unscathed by storm, but ruifled by the breeze, 
And venerable with the frost of age, 
Whose hoary head did eyes of all engage. 
He lived a life of moderation — health 
Repaid his virtues with her better wealth. 
He lived a life of temperance, and so 
Attained an age but seldom reached below. 
He loved his country, and in youth engaged 
In war that was with mother country waged, 
To gain that freedom which belongs to man 
By right of birth. Let us do all we can 
To guard from sacrilege that sacred fire, 
Nor let the flame of libertj' expire. 

When the Federal soldiers retreated from Richmond, Ky. , during 
the rebellion in the United States, at which place they were defeated 
by the Confederate Army, several hundred of the struggling soldiers 
passed by the Hickman graveyard in Clark county, Kentucky, when 
curiosity prompted one of them to peruse some of the inscriptions 
upon the tombstones. After reading that of Joel Hickman, Sr. , he 
called aloud to his comrades that ' ' here is buried a soldier of the 
Revolution." They paused a few moments, fired a salute over his 
grave and marched on. This incident was witnessed by Cordilia 
Holladay and others. 

Joel Hickman and his wife, Frances Garetta, had twelve chil- 
dren, viz, : 

E 1. John Wilson, born in 1787; married Betsy Bronaugh. 

E 2. James Lewis, born in 1788 ; married Maria Shackelford. 

E 3. Nancy E., born in 1790, and died 1791. 

E 4. Polly Terrell, born in 1792; married George Gilmour. 

E 5. Sally Lawson, born in 1794; married James Eastham. 

E 6. Thomas Elliott, born in 1796; married Virginia . 

12 



178 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

E 7. Sophia Weston, born in 1798; married Thomas Holton. 

E 8. Adeline Demarquis, born in 1800; never married. 

E 9. Eliza Bird, born in 1802; married John Reed. 

E 10. Joel Franklin, born in 1804; married Lucinda Hickman. 

E 11. Frances Garetta, born in 1807; married Addison T. Elliott. 

E 12. Edwin Clinton, born in 1810; married Amanda F. Best. 

E 1. John Wilson, married Betsy Bronaugh, by whom he had 
seven children. He married his second wife, by whom he had one 
daughter, making eight in all. He died in Boyle county, Kentucky, 
in 1847. The names of his eight children were as follows: 

F 1. William, resides near Sal visa, Mercer county, Ky. 

F 2. Lucy. 

F 3. Frances Garetta, married Mr. Boiling and died childless. 

F 4. Sarah Jane, married Mr. Martin; died in Boyle county, 
Kentucky, childless. 

F 5. Maria, married Mr. Hall and resides in Indiana. 

F 6. Eliza Ann, married S. C. Vanarsdal and died in Boyle 
county, Kentucky, in 1849, leaving several children. 

F 7. Mary Lewis, died single. 

F 8. Adeline, by second wife, resides in Boyle county, Kentucky. 

E 2. James Lewis, son of Joel Hickman and his wife, Frances 
Garetta, was born in 1788. He was for many years a merchant at 
Lexington, Ky. , from whence he moved to Todd county, Kentucky, 
where he died in 1855. He was in the War of 1812, and was in the 
battle of River Raisin, where he became a prisoner in the hands of 
the British. He was a member of Captain Hart's company from, 
Kentucky. He married, in 1818, Maria Shackelford, eldest daughter 
of Wm. S. Shackelford, of Fleming county, Kentucky. Unto them 
were born elcA^en children, viz. : 

F 1. Elizabeth Frances, born in Frankfort, Ky., in 1819, and 
died in 1819. 

F 2. Mary Sabina, born in Fleming county, Kentucky, in 1821, 
and died in 1826. 

F 3. William Shackleford, born in Clark county, Kentucky, in 
1823. 

F 4. Dr. Joel Thomas, born in Fayette county, Kentucky, in 
1825. 

F 5. James Lewis, born in Fayette county, Kentucky, in 1828, 
and died in 1828. 

F 6. Maria Trotter, born in Lexington, Ky., in 1829. 

F 7. Sarah Caroline, born in Fayette county, Kentucky, in 1832. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 179 

F 8, Amelia Frances, born in Fayette count}-, Kentucky, in 1834, 
and died in 1836. 

F 9. Ellen Douglas, born in Fayette county, Kentucky, in 1836. 

F 10. John James, born in Faj-ette county, Kentucky, in 1839. 

F 11. Edwin Clinton, born in Fa^'ette county, Kentucky, in 1842. 

All of James L. Hickman's children that are alive live in Todd 
county, Kentucky. 

F 4. Dr. Joel T., son of Jas. L. Hickman and Maria Shackle- 
ford, was married in Lexington, Ky. , in 1846, to Frances Downing, 
■daughter of Dr. John Terrell Lewis, formerly of Lexington, but 
now of CarroUton, Ky. They are related, and descendants of David 
Lewis, of Albemarle county, Virginia. They have children, viz. : 

G 1. James Lewis, born 1847; married Nancy L. Wright, of 
Audrian county, Missouri, in 1884. 

G 2. Joel Thomas, Jr., born 1849; married Cannie M. Davis, of 
Boone county, Missouri, in 1879. 

Gr 3. William Franklin, born 1852; married Josie Drumb, in 
1882; died in 1887 at Evansville, la. 

Gi- 4. Mary Letitia, born 1854. 

G- 5. John Breckinridge, born 1856; died 1860. 

G 6. Charles Douglas, born 1858; died 1860. 

G 7. Alice, born 1861; died 1862. 

G 8. Margaret Downing, born 1863; died 1888. 

G 9. Maria Shackleford, born 1866. 

G 10. David Clinton, born 1869. 

G 11. Martha Wilkinson, born 1871, and died March, 1890. 
Frances Downing, her mother, died March, 1890. 

F 6. Maria Trotter, daughter of Jas. L. Hickman and his wife, 
Maria Shackleford, was married in 1847 to Charles F. Coppage, 
of Lexington, Ky. They now reside in Todd county, Kentucky, and 
have children, viz. : 

G 1. Charles Lewis, born in Lexington, Ky., in 1848, and died 
in infancy. 

G 2. Mary Meriwether, born in Todd county, Kentucky, in 1850. 

G 3. Sarah Ellen, born in Todd county, Kentucky, in 1851 ; 
died in childhood. 

G 4. Maria Penelope, born in Louisville, Ky., in 1853. 

G 5. Sabina Franklin, born in Christian county, Kentucky, in 
1855, etc. 

F 7. Sarah Caroline, daughter of Jas. L. Hickman, was married 
in 1850, to Charles 0. Faxon, of Clarksville, Tenn. She died in 



180 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

1851, leaving an infant child, whose name is G 1, "William Henry, 
born 1851. 

E 4. Polly Terrell, daughter of Joel Hickman and Frances 
Garetta, his wife, married George Gilmore ; had nine children, and 
died in Christian county, Kentucky, in 1828. Her children live in 
Hancock and Warren counties, Illinois. John W. lives in Albany, 
Ore. The following are the names of her children: 

F 1. James Lewis; F 2, Joel; F 3, John Wilson, Albany; F 4, 
Alexander; New Lancaster, 111. ; F 5, Thomas Elliott, left a widow 
and children in Illinois ; F 6, Robert ; F 7, Ellen, married Mr. Salter 
and Mr. Little; F 8, Mary, died unmarried, etc. 

E 5. Sally Lawson, daughter of Joel Hickman and Frances 
Garetta, his wife, married James Eastham, had six children, and 
died in Lexington, Ky. , in 1857. 

The following notice we clip fi-om the Lexington Observer and 
Eepotier of August 8, 1857: 

Died in this citj' on the 3d inst., after a very brief illness, Mrs. Sally L. 
Eastham, in the sixty-fourth year of her age. 

The deceased had long been an exemplary member of the Christian 
church, and we trust her often-troubled life has been exchanged for a more 
blissful state of existence. Deeply will her mourning children feel the 
loss of a remarkably kind and devoted mother. 

On the 6th instant she was followed to the spirit world by her 
son, George Eastham, who died of consumption in the thirteenth 
year of his age. He also had for years been a member of the 
Church of Christ, and those who have known him well testify that 
he had led an exemplary life. During his long and distressing ill- 
ness he manifested the resignation and faith and hope of a Chris- 
tian. In early manhood he has passed away. Truly, ' ' Life is but 
a vapor, that appeareth for a little time and then vanisheth away. ' ' 

E 5. Sally Lawson had six children, viz. : 

F 1. Malinda; F 2, William; F 3, Llewellen; F 4, George, died; 
F 5, John, and F (j, Milton, who was shot accidentally by a young 
man in Lexington, Ky. , during Christmas, and died the next 
day. 

E 6. Thomas Elliott Hickman, son of Joel and Frances Garetta, 
was born in 1796, in Clark county, Kentucky. He died in 
Winchester, Ky., in 1838, leaving an only daughter, who died 
single in 1848. Her name was F 1, Mary Ann, born 1833, and 
died 1848. 

The following account of the death, etc. , of Mary Ann Hickman, 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 181 

we copy fi-om the work entitled, ' ' Scraps of Poetry and Prose, ' ' by 
Edwin C. Hickman, page 83: 



rN MEMORY OF 

MARY ANN, 
Daughter of the late Thomas E. and Vir- 
ginia Hickman, 
Died in Lexington, Ky., 
May 13, 1848, 
In her fifteenth vear. 



She was a pupil of the Female Collegiate High School of Lex- 
ington, and was selected to be one of the Maids of Honor at the 
May-day celebration, but ere that daj arrived, she was doomed to 
rise no more. The address which, prepared for the occasion, she 
was to deliver at the contemplated celebration, has received so strik- 
ing an illustration in her own untimely death, that it is here inserted : 

Accept, O Queen, this fresh bouquet, 

Fit offering on this festive day; 

Spring is a type of youthful bloom, 

These flowers mementos of our doom. 

For, though the mantling cheeks disclose 

The varied tints of blushing rose, 

Yet beauty, howsoe'er arrayed, 

Blooms still, like fragile flowers, to fade, 

While VIRTUE — amaranthine flower, 

Though blighted once in Eden's bower, 

Fails not, with passing years to bloom 

And wreathe its blossoms round the tomb. 

Then be the bloom of virtue ours, 

That fades not like these fading flowers. 

Yes, the bloom of virtue was hers; she remembered her Creator 
in the days of her youth, and she has gone to a greater coronation 
than that of May-day Queen — "to receive (herself) a crown of 
glory that fadeth not away," — to join "that great multitude which 
HO man can number of all nations and kindreds and people and 
languages that stand before the Lamb, with white robes, and palms 
in their hands, crjing with a loud voice — salvation to our God, who 
sitteth upon the throne and to the Lamb ! ' ' 

E 7. Sophia Weston, daughter of Joel Hickman and his wife, 
Frances Garetta, was born in 1798; married Thomas Holton; resided 
in Madison county, Kentucky, and had two children, viz. : 

F 1. Thomas, died in 1855. 



182 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

F 2. Adeline, married Thomas Jones, and resides in Cass 
county, Missouri. 

E 8. Adeline Demarquis, daughter of Joel Hickman and his 
wife, Frances Garetta, was born in the year 1800. She never mar- 
ried ; resided in Clark county, Kentucky. 

E 9. Eliza Bird, daughter of Joel Hickman, was born in the 
year 1802; married John Reed; died in Madison county, Kentucky, 
in 1855. She had but one child, viz. : 

F 1. Eliza Bird, who married Jeremiah Collins, and left two 
children, viz.: Gr 1, Edwin H. ; G 2, John Pendleton. 

E 10. Joel Franklin, son of Joel Hickman, married his cousin, 
Lucinda, daughter of James Hickman and his wife, Betsy Bryan. 
He died in Buchanan county, Missouri, about 1847, leaving seven 
children, viz. : 

F 1. John W.; F 2, James; F 3, Elizabeth; F 4, Louisa; F 5, 
Maria; F 6, Mary, and F 7, Martha A. 

E 11. Frances Garetta, daughter of Joel Hickman, was born in 
1807; married Addison T. Elliott; died in 1831, in Jefferson county, 
Kentucky, leaving three children, viz : 

F 1 . Edwin Temple, lives near Kiddville, Clark county, Ky. 

F 2. Priscilla Frances, married Ellison A. Daniel, Jr. She died 
in 1854, in Dallas county, Texas, leaving one child. 

F 3. Mary Eliza, married Wm. H. Dean; resides in Madison 
county, Kentucky, and has children, viz.: G 1, Addison; G 2, 
Fanny, etc. 

E 12. Edwin Clinton, son of Joel Hickman and his wife, Frances 
Garetta, was born in 1810. He was a man of fine accomplishments 
and taught school the most of his time when not engaged on his 
farm. He was endowed with a poetical genius, and was the author 
of a small work entitled " Scraps of Poetry and Prose," which was 
published in Lexington, Ky., in 1854, by A. W. Elder, a copy of 
which he presented to the author of the ' ' Genealogy of the Lewis 
Family." 

The following is a copy of the epitaph to be found on the tomb- 
stone of Ed. C. Hickman, in Clark county, Kentucky: 



EDWIN C. HICKMAN, 

Born in Clark County, Kentucky, 

May 10, 1810, 

Died in Lexington, Ky., May 5, 186L 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 18Sf 

About the year 1839 Ed. C. Hickman married Amanda F. Best, 
daughter of Dr. Robt. Best, a native of England, and who died in 
Lexington, Ky., in 1830. 



IN MEMORY OF 

AMANDA F., 

Wife of Edwin C. Hickman and daughter 

of the late Dr. Robert Best, 

Born in Cincinnati, O., April 29, 1815, 

Died in Clark County, Kentucky, 

January 22, 1845. 



E 12. Edwin C. Hickman and his wife, Amanda F., had three 
children, viz. : 

F 1. Captain Robert Best, born 1840. 

F 2. Lieutenant Joel Drake, born 1842. 

F 3. William H., born 1845, and died 1845. 

Captain Rob. B. and Lieutenant Joel D. were both young men of 
talents and of great promise, with fine accomplishments, etc. When 
the Civil war in the United States began in 1861 they both enlisted 
in the Federal Army and received commissions as officers in the war. 

The following are copies of the epitaphs to be found on their 
graves : 



CAPTAIN ROBERT B. HICKMAN, 

Born October IG, 1840 ; 

Mortally wounded at the battle of Stone 

River January 2, 1863, while gal- 

lantl}- leading his men. 

Died January 4, 1863. 



LIEUTENANT JOEL D. HICKMAN, 

Born July 31, 1842, 

And was killed at Lexington, Ky., 

December 19, 1861. 

He was noble, generous and brave. 



He was shot by one of his sentinels. 

D 9. Hannah, daughter of James Hickman and Hannah Lewis, 
his wife, was born in Culpeper county, Virginia, in 1765. She 



184 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

married George L. Hill (a brother of Joseph, who married her sister 
Eleanor), of Virginia, in 1782, and raised nine children and died at 
Darby ville, Pickaway county, 0., in 1854. She and her husband 
were both buried at Darby's Creek, near Darbyville. She was 
eighty-nine and he eighty-five years of age. They were pious mem- 
bers of the Baptist church. The following are the names of their 
nine children: 

E 1. Susan Hickman, born 1788; married Archibald Shockley. 

E 2. John P., born 1790; married Mrs. Nancy L. Haley, nee 
Nancy Hill, and Mrs. Bridges. 

E 3. Hannah, born 1792; married Rev. George Ambrose. 

E 4. James Lewis, born 1794; died single. 

E 5. George, born 1797; married Catharine Price. 

E 6. Silas P., born 1799; married Pauline Haley. 

E 7. Leroy Lewis; born 1801; married Nancy L. Haley. 

E 8. Elizabeth, born 1803; married Col. James Mitchell. 

E 9. Nancy, born 1805; married Sam Thompson and James 
Magill. 

E 1. Susan H., daughter of Hannah and George Hill, married 
Archibald Shockley and died in Darbyville, Pickaway count}', 0., 
in 1853, leaving five children, viz. : 

F i. Woodson, married Martha Smith, and has children, viz.: 
G 1, Mary; G 2, George; G 3, Nelson, etc. 

F 2. Editha, married Jacob Kiler, had three children and died at 
Darbyville, 0. Her children were G 1, Henrietta, etc. 

F 3. Ewel, married a Miss Bowman, and has children, viz. : 
G 1, George, etc. 

F 4. Orilla, married Thomas Bowman, and died in Pickaway 
county, leaving two children, viz.: G 1, John; G 2, Margaret. 

F 5. Celia, married Wm. Gilliland and has children, viz. : G 1, 
John; G 2, Mary Elizabeth, etc. 

E 2. John P. Hill, son of Hannah and George, was in the War 
of 1812, and was in the battle of Baltimore. He was also in the 
Black Hawk war in 1832 under General Henry. He was twice mar- 
ried, first to his cousin, Mrs. Nancy Lewis Haley, widow of John 
Haley, and daughter of Mrs. Eleanor and Joseph Hill. His second 
wife was Mrs. Bridges. He lives near Chatham, Sangamon county, 
111., and has no children. He followed farming and trading in 
cattle until within a few years. He is now (1857) living on the 
interest of his money. 

E 3. Hannah Hill, daughter of Hannah and George, was born 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY, 185 

1792. She married Rev. Greorge Ambrose, a baptist minister. She 
was also an exemplary member of the Baptist church. Rev. George 
Ambrose died in 1850. A plain marble slab marks his tomb in the 
family bur3ing ground, one mile southeast of Darbyville, on a 
beautiful knoll on the east bank of Darby creek, and by his side 
rest the remains of his son and daughter, and also George and 
Hannah Hill, his father and mother-in-law. Mrs. Eleanor Hill and 
her only son, James, are also buried there. Mrs. Hannah Ambrose, 
in 1860, was engaged in the mercantile business at Darbyville, 0. 
She raised only three children, viz. : 

F 1. Dr. George Ambrose, born 1824. 

F 2. Linny Ann, born 1826. 

F 3. Silas J., born 1828. 

F 1. Dr. George Ambrose, married his cousin, Ellen Frances, 
daughter of Leroy Lewis Hill and his wife, Nancy Haley, who was 
a daughter of James Haley and his wife, Elizabeth Hill, who was a 
daughter of Joseph Hill and his wife, Eleanor Hickman. Dr. 
George Ambrose resides in Oregon, and is a man of respectable tal- 
ents; has represented his county in the State Legislature several 
times. He has children, viz. : G 1, Utilla Ann; G 2, Lil}^ Florence; 
G 3, Willis Leslie, etc. 

F 2. Linny Ann Ambrose, married George Ambrose and died in 
1855, leaving one child, viz. : G 1, Matilda. 

F 3. Silas Ambrose, married Mary Zinn and died in 1854, leav- 
ing no children. He was a young man of great promise, was elected 
clerk of the court, which office he held at the time of his death. 

E 4. James Lewis Hill, son of Hannah and George, was born 
1794 and died single in Norfolk, Va., in 1814, as a volunteer in the 
War of 1812. 

E 5. George Hill, son of Hannah and George, was born in 1797; 
married Catharine Price, resides near Moundville, Marshall county, 
Va,, and has children, viz. : 

F 1. James Hickman; F 2, Louisa, etc. 

E 6. Silas P. Hill, son of Hannah and George, was born 1799; 
married Paulina Haley, daughter of John Haley, and his wife, 
Nancy Lewis Hill, who was a daughter of Joseph Hill and his wife, 
Eleanor Hickman. Silas P. died in Christian county, Illinois, leav- 
ing no posterity. 

E 7, Leroy Lewis Hill, son of Hannah and George, was born in 
1801 ; married Nancy L. Haley, daughter of James Haley and his 
wife, Elizabeth Hill, who was a daughter of Joseph Hill and his 



186 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

wife, Eleanor Hickman. Leroy L. and his sons are engaged in 
farming and trading in horses, cattle, hogs, etc. The}^ live near 
Hempland, Lafayette county, Mo. Leroy L. has six children, viz. : 

F 1. Ellen Frances, married Dr. George Ambrose and resides 
in Oregon. For the names of her children the reader is referred to 
Dr. George Ambrose's children. 

F 2. James H. ; F 3, Willis A. ; F 4, Leroy W., of Oregon; F 5, 
Ormizinda, married Mr. Twist, of Oregon, and F 6, Edward T. 

E 8. Elizabeth Hill, daughter of Hannah and George, was born 
in 1803; married Colonel James Mitchell and died in Madison 
county, Ohio, in 1840, leaving two sons (twins) whose names are as 
follows : 

F 1. David, a clerk in Hannah Ambrose's store, Darbyville, 0. 

F 2. James, residing with his father in London, Madison 
county, 0. 

E 9. Nancj' Lewis Hill, daughter of Hannah and George, was. 
born in 1805. She was twice married, first to Sam. Thompson, by 
whom she had three children. Her second husband was James- 
Magill, by whom she has children. She resides near Darbyville, 0. 
The names of her children are as follows: 

F 1. Samuel H. Thompson is a merchant at Darbyville 0. He 
married Theresa Radcliff, granddaughter of Judge Florence, of 
Pickaway county, Ohio, and has children, viz. : 

G 1. Alice Florence; G 2, Emma, etc. 

F 2. Paulina Thompson, married "Wm. A. Miller, resides at 
Darbyville, 0., and has children, viz.: G 1, James; G 2, Virginia; 
G 3, Belle ; G 4, George ; G 5, Samuel, etc. 

F 3. David T. Thompson, is a merchant at Pekin, Tazewell 
county, 111., and has children, viz. : G 1, Cora, etc. 

F 4. Wm. McGill; F 5, Leroy McGill and F 6, Susan H.. 
McGill, etc. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 187 



CHAPTEE YIII. 

MRS. SARAH MUSICK, ST. LOUIS COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

C 4. Sarah, daughter of David Lewis, of Albemarle county, 
Virginia, was born about 1824, in Hanover county, Virginia. She 
married Abraham Musick, son of George, from Wales. George 
Musick was a foundling. He was picked up by some person in 
Wales who could not learn anything aboift his parents. He was so 
small that he did not know his own name except ' ' George. ' ' He 
proved to be a very smart boy and extremely fond of music, so they 
called him ' ' George Musick. ' ' He emigrated to America and settled 
in Virginia during her colonial days, where he died, leaving five 
sons, viz. : Daniel, George, Electerus, Ephraim and Abraham, who 
married Sarah Lewis. Ephraim, his brother, belonged to the 
Church of England until he was an old man, and then joined the 
Baptist. He was a farmer, and resided in Albemarle county, Vir- 
ginia, in plain view of Mouticello, the residence of Thomas Jeffer- 
son. He left five sons and a daughter. His sons' names were : 
Abraham, John, Thomas, Roy and Ephraim. His daughter married a 
man by the name of Jenkins, and Abraham married his cousin, 
Terrell Musick, to be mentioned hereafter. Sarah Lewis and her 
husband, Abraham Musick emigrated from Virginia to South Caro- 
lina in 1766, and from there to Rutherford county, North Carolina, 
in 1773, and from Rutherford to Illinois in 1794, and from thence to 
St. Louis county, Missouri, where they both died about the year 
1800, near Florissant, twelve miles from the city of St. Louis. 
They had eleven children, viz. : 

D 1. Terrell Musick, born about 1748; married Abraham 
Musick. 

D 2. Lewis Musick, born about 1 750 ; married Mary Mackey. 

D 3. John Musick, born about 1752; died single. 

D 4. Joel Musick, born about 1754. 

D 5. Sarah Musick, born about 1756; married Jo. Williams. 

D 6. William Musick, born about 1758; married Winifred Han- 
non. 

D 7. Susannah Musick, born about 1760; married Solomon Link 
and Edward Sullins. 



188 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

D 8. Colonel David Musick, born about 1763; married Prudence 
Whitesides. 

D 9. Jehoida Musick, born about 1765; married Sally Wynn. 

D 10. Ephraim Musick, born about 1767; married Nan McMillan. 

D 11. James Musick, born about 1769; married Nan Withinton. 

D 1. Terrell Musick, the eldest child of Sarah Lewis and Abraham 
Musick, was born about 1748. She was a pious member of the Baptist 
church, and married Abraham Musick, her cousin, a son of Ephraim. 
She raised nine children, having three at one birth and two at 
another. She died within fifteen miles of St. Louis, about the year 
1832, and was buried at Fifer Creek in St. Louis county, Missouri. 
The names of her children are as follows: 

E 1. Asa; E 2, Eli; E 3, Uri; E 4, Edi; E 5, Roy; E 6, Uel; 
E 7, Sarah; E 8, Anna, and E 9, Isabella. 

E 1. Asa Musick, was born about 1770; married Elizabeth 
Moore, had five children and died on Strawberry river, in Arkansas. 
The names of his children were as follows: 

F 1. Matilda, married Robert Ferguson, and died without issue 
at the mouth of White river, Arkansas. 

F 2. John, married a Miss Riddle ; died in Texas and had chil- 
dren, viz.: G 1, John; G 2, Alfred; G 3, Malinda; G 4, Maria, and 
G 5, Simpson. 

F 3. William, went to Kentucky. 

F 4. Alfred, died in Texas. 

F 5. Malinda, married Mr. Simpson, and was living at Mills' 
Point, on the Mississippi river, when last heard from. 

E 2. Eli, son of Terrell Musick, was born about 1773. He was a 
member of the Baptist church; was a soldier in the War of 1812. 
Nancy Long, his wife, was born in Port Royal, S. C, and died in 
Franklin county, Missouri, in 1860, and he died near Florissant, in 
St. Louis county, in 1850. They raised three children, viz. : 

F 1. William, married a Miss Ferguson; they both died in 1857, 
leaving children, viz.: G 1, Lavinia; G 2, Wrenshall F. ; G 3, John 
E., of St. Louis, etc. 

F 2. Priscilla, married Jas. Robinson and Wm. Richey; died in 
Franklin county, Missouri, leaving children, viz. : G 1, William R. ; 
G 2, James R. ; G 3, Mary Ann ; G 4, Priscilla, etc. 

E 3. Edi, son of Terrell Musick, was born about 1777; died 
single, in Kentucky, in 1822. 

E 4. Roy, son of Terrell Musick, died in childhood. 

E 5. Uri, son of Terrell Musick, was born about 1782; was a 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 189 

member of the Baptist church; married Elizabeth Sullins; died 
in St. Louis county, Missouri, in 1856, leaving seven children, 
viz. : 

F 1. John, died single, in 1825. 

F 2. David L., married twice; his second wife was Julia James. 
He died of cholera about 1848, leaving one daughter, viz. : G 1, 
Julia. 

F 3. James M. , married a Miss Williams, daughter of OIley 
Williams, of St. Louis county. They left children. 

F 4. William, married. 

F 5. Sarah, married James Link, and left children. 

F 6. Mary, married John James, and died in 1853, leaving 
children. 

F 7. Pamelia, married John Hyatt, and died in St. Louis county, 
leaving children. 

E 6. Sarah, daughter of Terrell Musick, married Samuel Bay, 
and died near Calvy, Franklin county, Mo., in 1852, leaving chil- 
dren, viz. : F 1, Uri; F 2, Thomas; F 3, John; F 4, Eli; F 5, Wil- 
liam. 

E 7. Uel, son of Terrell Musick, was born about 1793; married 
in 1818, Sarah Casson; resided near Catawissa P. 0., Franklin 
county, Mo., in 1868, and had nine children, viz. : 

F 1. William, born in 1819; married Elizabeth Pritchett; resided 
in Franklin county, Missouri, until he moved to Zolo county, Cali- 
fornia. He left children. 

F 2. Mary, born in 1822 ; married Andrew McCloure and Wash- 
ington Jones. They live in Franklin count}", Missouri. 

F 3. Abraham, was born in 1824; married Mary Ann Coleman and 
Mrs. Ramsey. He has children and resides in Benton county, Mis- 
souri. He was a soldier in the Confederate war. 

F 4. Priscilla, born in 1828; married Anselm L. Davidson, has 
children, and resides at Harrisonville, Cass county, Mo. 

F 5. James, born in 1831; died on the road to California in 
1852. 

F 6. Frances M. , born in 1833 ; married Martha T witty ; was in the 
Confederate Army, has children, and resides near Catawissa, Frank- 
lin county. Mo. 

F 7. Margaret J., born in 1835; married Abner Davidson, had 
three children, and died in 1857. 

F 8. Eliza A. . married Van B. Humphries and Richard Daniels ; 
resides at Hammonville, Cass county. Mo. , and has three children. 



190 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

F 9. Eli, born 1840; married, and resides at Harrison ville, Cass 
county, Mo. He was a soldier in the Confederate Army, and was 
in eighteen or twenty battles, viz. : Elkhorn, Camden, Corinth, luca, 
Grand Gulf, Port Gibson, Baker's Creek, Vieksburg, etc. 

E 8. Anna, daughter of Terrell Musick, married Joab Barton 
and Thomas Meadows; they resided in Cole county, Missouri, and 
left children. 

E 9. Isabella, daughter of Terrell Musick, was born about 1792; 
married James Walton ; resided in St. Louis county, Missouri, had 
six children, and died in 1864. Her children were as follows: 

F 1. William, married twice in St. Louis county, Missouri, and 
has children, 

F 2. James, married twice, ha^ children, St. Louis county, 
Missouri. 

F 3. Frederick, St. Louis county, Missouri. 

F 4. Polly, married twice, has children, St. Louis county, Mis- 
souri. 

F 5. Nancy, married Mr. Underwood, has children, St. Louis 
county, Missouri. 

F 6. Cyrena, married Mr. Hanley and has children. 

D 2; Lewis, son of Sarah and Abraham Musick, was born about 
1750 in Virginia. He was a soldier of the Revolutionary war and 
was a terror to the Tories; he killed, it is said, about sixty of them 
himself. He moved with his father from South Carolina, in 1773, 
to Rutherford county. North Carolina. After the close of the Revo- 
lutionary war, while fighting the Cherokee Indians, in company with 
several others on a scout, he shot and wounded an Indian as he was 
crawling down the bank of a creek. Lewis Musick dismounted and 
ran in pursuit of the wounded Indian, and as he crossed the stream 
and ascended the opposite bank one of his own men, by the name of 
McDaniel, who had been a Tory during the war, mistook him, as he 
said, for the Indian and fired on him, the ball passing through his 
head and killing him. Colonel David Musick, his brother, was one 
of the men that was present, and after McDaniel shot his brother 
Lewis he (Colonel David) cocked his gun and swore he would kill 
him if he was the last man on earth, but McDaniel begged and 
implored him not to kill him as it was done through a mistake ; the 
Colonel at length became reconciled and did not kill him, but the 
family believe to this day that McDaniel knew very well who he 
was shooting at. This incident occurred in Rutherford count}', 
North Carolina. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 191 

Lewis Musick married Mary Mackey and left one aaughter, viz. : 
E 1, Jane, who married Charles Duncan and was living near Jeft'er- 
■sonville, Ky. She had children; her oldest son was by the name of 
F 1, Lewis Duncan. 

D 3. John, son of Sarah Lewis and her husband, Abraham 
Musick, died in early life. 

D 4. Sarah, daughter of Sarah Lewis and her husband, Abraham 
Musick, was born about 1756. She was a member of the Baptist 
■church and married Joseph Williams. They died in Missouri, leav- 
ing nine children, viz. : 

E 1. Micajah; E 2, James; E 3, Rev. Lewis; E 4, Wm. Sherley; 
E 5, John; E 6, Benjamin F. ; E 7, Mary; E 8, Olive, and E 9, 
Arabella. 

E 1. Micajah Williams, son of Joseph, was born about 1775, and 
"was a soldier in the War of 1812 under Colonel David Musick, of 
St. Louis count}', Missouri. He married Mary Sullins and died in 
Missouri about 1825, leaving a number of children. 

E 2. Lieutenant James Williams, son of Joseph, served as a 
Lieutenant in the War of 1812 under Colonel David Musick as a 
United States ranger. He married Mary Cook, died in Cole county, 
Missouri, about 1848, leaving no children. 

E 3. Rev. Lewis Williams, son of Joseph, was a Baptist 
minister. He married Nancy Jump, lived on St. John's creek, 
Franklin county, Mo. He raised one son and several daughters. 
His son's name was: 

F 1. Rev. Alvin Peter Williams, who was a very able Baptist 
minister. He is the author of a work, the design of which is to 
show the impropriety of communion with the Campbellite denomi- 
nation. 

[From the Memphis Baptist of July 13, 1867.] 

Rev. A. P. Williams, D. D., of Missouri, is also a man of high position 
in the church. He is a powerful speaker and an entirely self-made man. 

[From Western Recorder of July, 1867.] 

We understand that Rev. A. P. Williams, D. D., of Missouri, has signi- 
fied his intention to accept the call of Bethel and Salem churches, of Bethel 
Association, and as soon as he can make arrangements will remove to the 
State. This will be a great loss to Missouri Baptists, but a corresponding 
gain to Kentucky Baptists. Dr. Williams is a veteran soldier of the Cross, 
and will do good service wherever his lot may be cast. It is useless for us 
to say a word of him by way of introduction to Kentucky Baptists — for we 
all know him and love him. We welcome him to our State, and trust he 
may find it a useful and pleasant field of labor. 



192 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

The following extract we copy from the proceedings of the Baptist 
Convention : 

The Committee to report resolutions, relative to the death of Brethren 
Manly and Williams, reported, through Brother J. B. Jeter, of Virginia, 
the following with reference to Brother A. P. Williams, which was 
adopted: 

REPOKT OP COMMITTEE ON DEATH OF REV. A. P. WILLIAMS. 

The Committee was instructed also to report a suitable memorial of the 
late Rev. A. P. Williams, D. D., of Missouri. He was a highly-honored 
and greath'-beloved friend of this Convention, and of all the interests which 
it represents. God endowed him with a remarkably clear, vigorous and 
active intellect which, without earl}' culture, had been bj' many years of 
study carefully disciplined and richlj' stored with Bible knowledge. Few 
men of the age possessed a more logical, discriminating and creative mind. 
He devoted all his powers in early life to the ministry of the Gospel, and 
rarely has any man made a fuller proof of his ministry'. He was fervent in 
spirit, sound in doctrine, abundant in labor, wise in counsel and successful 
in winning souls. He was equally efficient in the pulpit, on the platform 
or with the pen. By force of character, sound judgment, conciliating 
manners and incessant effort he placed himself in the front rank of the 
Baptists of Missouri and, indeed, of the denomination. Dr. Williams was 
suddenly cut otf by a casualty, while yet in the full vigor of life and in the 
midst of increasing labors, influence, usefulness and honors. His death 
opened a painful chasm in the ministry of his State, and awakened sincere 
sorrow among a wide circle of friends, who loved him for his piety, admired 
him for his abilities and rejoiced in his successes. Your Committee deem 
it proper to offer this brief tribute to the memory of one whose name is. 
enrolled in the list of the Vice-Presidents of the Convention, and whose 
virtues and labors are worthy to be held in everlasting remembrance. 

Rev. A. P. Williams' untimely death was caused by his horse 
running away and upsetting his buggy. 

E 4. William Sherley Williams, son of Joseph, lived in the 
Rocky Mountains and with the Indians about fifty years, and spoke 
the language of all the different tribes. He was killed in the Rocky 
Mountains in attempting to recover the instruments lost by John C. 
Fremont in attempting to cross the Rocky Mountains during a snow- 
storm. He was impressed by Fremont to act as his guide over the 
mountains. Wm. S. Williams married a Mexican woman and left 
a son in New Mexico. 

E 5. John, son of Jo. Williams, married and lives near St. 
John's P. 0., Franklin county, Mo. 

E 6. Benjamin F. Williams, son of Jo. , married a Miss Hamilton, 
of St. Louis, Mo., had a large family of children and died on the 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 193 

east side of the Osage river, on the road leading from St. Louis to 
Jefferson City, Mo. 

E 7. Mary Williams, daughter of Jo. , married Francis Mattox, 
an Englishman ; has a large family of children and resides on St. 
Johns creek, in Franklin county Missouri. 

E 8. Olive Williams, daughter of Jo. , married Thomas Wynn ; 
had children and died in Franklin county, Missouri. 

E 9. Arabella Williams, daughter of Jo., married and died in 
Franklin county, Missouri. 

D 5. Joel, son of Sarah Lewis and Abraham Musick, was born 
about 1754. He was drowned in South Carolina in attempting to 
cross a river on a floating bridge. He married and left issue. One 
of his sons, E 1, David, lived on the Osage river in Missouri. 

D 6. William Musick, son of Sarah and Abraham, was born 
about 1760. He was said to be a perfect specimen of the " genus 
homo, ' ' very tall and athletic, fair skin and blue eyes — a model of 
manly beautj\ Like his other brothers, he espoused the cause of 
the colonies, shouldered his musket, volunteered his services and 
did good service in her behalf throughout the war, as one of the 
bravest of the brave, even to recklessness. After the close of the 
war he was engaged to Miss Winifred Hannon, niece of Col. John 
Earl, of Rutherford count}", North Carolina. The family was 
opposed to the union; he, however, prevailed on her to elope with 
him, and he married her. Soon after this occurrence the Musick 
family all left Rutherford and emigrated to Illinois and Missouri. 
William and his wife both died in St. Louis county, Missouri about 
the year 1804, leaving four children, viz. : 

E 1. Lewis, son of William and Miss Hannon, after the death of 
his father was raised by his uncle. Colonel David Musick. He was 
a very small man, spare made, beardless and weighing about one 
hundred and twenty-five pounds. He married Mary Dixon. He and 
his wife were both drowned in the Mississippi river, five miles below 
the mouth of the Missouri river, by the capsizing of a keel boat 
during a storm in 1827. He was found fourteen days afterward and 
buried seven or eight miles below St. Louis, by James C. Musick 
and others. His wife was never found. They left no children. 

E 2. Washington, son of William Musick and Miss Hannon. was 
a noble, fine-looking boy, but died at fifteen years of age. 

E 3. James, son of William Musick and Miss Hannon, went to 
Texas about 1825, rambled over that State, and then returned and 
was living at Mill's Point, on the Mississippi river, in 1828, with 
13 



194 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Mr. Simpson, who married Malinda, the second daughter of Asa 
Musick. 

E 4. Pamelia, daughter of William Musick and Miss Hannon, 
married Joseph Walton, and was living on the State road leading 
from Jefferson City to Springfield, Mo. , and had a large family of 
children. 

D 7. Susannah, daughter of Sarah Lewis and her husband, 
Abraham Musick, was born about 1762. She was twice married; 
first, to Solomon Link, by whom she had one daughter. Her second 
husband was Edward Sullins, by whom she had two sons, viz. : 

E 1. Sarah Link, married Robert Musick (called "red-head 
Bob"); died on Strawberry or White river, Arkansas, and left chil- 
dren. 

E 2. Washington Sullins, lived on St. John's Creek, Franklin 
county, Missouri. 

E 3. Jefferson Sullins, lived on St. John's Creek, Franklin 
county, Missouri. 

D 8. Colonel David Musick, son of Sarah and Abraham, was 
torn in Albemarle county, Virginia, in 1763; was two years of age 
when his father moved from Virginia to South Carolina. In 1776 
his father moved to Rutherford count}'. North Carolina, where he 
remained until the year 1794. In the spring of 1777, during the 
Revolutionary war, the Cherokee Indians became very troublesome 
and the family all moved into forts, where they remained until 
David was sixteen years of age. He then entered into the service 
of the then colonies and continued until the close of the war in 
1781. The most of his time he spent on the frontiers fighting the 
Indians — one year of the time as a ranger. Three times he assisted 
in burning the towns of the Cherokee Indians. He was in a great 
many skirmishes and battles, and was in the battle at Guilford Court 
House, N. C. , under General Green. It is said there were twenty- 
two cousins of the Lewis connection in the battles of King's Moun- 
tain and Guilford Court House, including the Lewises, Hickmans, 
Musicks, Mackeys, Terrells, Martins, Fielders, Benges, McConnells, 
Adams, Rowlands, Ballengers, Hacketts, etc. 

In 1794, Colonel David Musick moved to the State of Illinois, 
and the Indians being troublesome there he was engaged in two or 
three skirmishes with them. He there married Prudence Whiteside, 
daughter of Dr. James Whiteside, from Rutherford county, North 
Carolina, at Whiteside Station in Illinois, in 1794, and moved to St. 
Louis county, Missouri, in 1795, and settled at Florisant, a French 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 195 

village, twelve miles northwest of St. Louis. He was a soldier in 
the War of 1812 with Great Britain, and raised a company of 
mounted horsemen to serve on the frontier, he being at that time 
colonel of the county of St. Louis. In July, 1812, he was called 
into service, and remained in the service for two years, during 
which time he was in several battles and skirmishes with the Indians. 
Since that time he had the honor of representing St. Louis 
county three times as a member of the General Assembly in the 
State Legislature, and once as Presidential elector for the State of 
Missouri. He died in St. Louis county, Missouri, in 1837, leaving 
nine children, viz. : 

E 1. Mary, born in 1797 ; married Wm. Musick and Wash. Fugate. 

E 2. Sarah, born in 1799; married Wm. Munday. 

E 3. Joel Lewis, born in 1801 ; married Margaret Pripe. 

E 4. James Chiles, born in 1803; married Phebe Jemison. 

E 5. Susannah Terrell, born in 1805; married Dr. Delford Ben- 
ton. 

E 6. Delilah, born in 1807; died 1825. 

E 7. Miriam, born in 1809; married James M. Martin. 

E 8. David Russell, born in 1812; married Elizabeth Yoste. 

E 9. Jehoiada Gipson, born in 1817; married Elizabeth Munday. 

E 1. Mary, daughter of Colonel David, married twice: first, to 
William Musick, and had five children. Her second husband was 
Washington Fugate, by whom she had two daughters, viz. : 

F 1. James Musick, died young. 

F 2. Golben Musick, married Harriet Brown ; has children, lives 
in Florisant and is a Justice of the Peace. 

F 3. Warren Musick, died young. 

F 4. Moriah Musick, married James Munday; has no children, 
and resides at Florisant. 

F 5. Sarah Musick, married Hunt Purdam; had five or six chil- 
dren ; both are dead and the children live with their grandmother at 
Florisant. 

F 6. Oldest daughter by Fugate, married Mr. Adams, and has 
children. 

F 7. The name of the other not known. 

E 2. Sarah, daughter of Colonel David, married William Mun- 
day; has no children; resides, a widow, at Florisant, Mo. 

E 3. Joel Lewis, son of Colonel David, was born in 1801; mar- 
ried, in 1823, Margaret Pripe. He at different times held the follow- 
ing oflJces: Justice of the Peace, Postmaster, Collector of the 



196 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Revenue of St. Louis county, and member-elect to the General 
Assembly of the State of Missouri. He died in St. Louis county 
in 1832, leaving three children, marked F, vi3, : 

F 1. Ezilda, married Dr. E. B. Forsee; has no children, and 
lives in St. Joseph, Mo. 

F 2. Amanda, married John Corby, a banker, of St. Joseph, 
Mo. ; has no children. 

F 3. Joseph, was a very promising youth; was accidentally shot 
and killed in 1848, in St. Louis, Mo. 

E 4. James Chiles, son of Colonel David, was born in 1803; was 
a surveyor by occupation; at different times he acted as Postmas- 
ter, Justice of the Peace, Major, Deputy Sheriff, Deputy United 
States Marshal, etc., in St. Louis county, Missouri, where he lived. 
In 1829 he married Phebe Jemison, from Rockbridge county, Vir- 
ginia, and died in 1864. His wife died in 1857, of erysipe- 
las. They had eight children, viz. : 

F 1. Julia Ann, born 1830; F 2, William Jemison, born 1833; 
F 3, Charles Edwin, born 1835; F 4, Richard Baxter, born 1837; 
F 5, Cornelia, born 1840; F 6, Margaret Ellen, born 1842; F 7, 
Henry, born 1844, and F 8, Kate, born 1853, and died 1856. 

E 5. Susannah Terrel, daughter of Colonel David, was born in 
1805; married Dr. Delford Benton, who is Postmaster, and is a 
merchant at Florisant, St. Louis count}^ Mo. They have children, 
viz. : F 1, Thomas; F 2, David; F 3, Prudence, etc. 

E 6. Delilah, daughter of Colonel David, was born in 1807, and 
died single, in 1825. 

E 7. Miriam, daughter of Colonel David, was born in 1809; 
married James M. Martin; they are both dead, leaving one son: 

F 1. Miron, who lives in Florisant with his Aunt Mary. 

E 8. David Russell, son of Colonel David, was born in 1812; 
married Elizabeth Yoste; resided in Pike county, Missouri, where he 
died about 1848, leaving several children, viz. : 

F 1. Joel; F 2, David, died; F 3, Elizabeth; F 4, Anna, etc. 

E 9. Jehoiada Gipson, son of Colonel David, born 1817, mar- 
ried Elizabeth Munday ; resides in Florisant, Mo. ; has eight chil- 
dren, viz. : 

F 1. David Owen, married Miss Alvares, and lives at Florisant, 
Mo. 

F 2. James; F 3, George; F 4, Edwin; F 5, Charles; F 6, De- 
lilah; F 7, Moriah, and F 8, Prudence. 

D 9. Jehoiada, son of Sarah Lewis and her husband, Abraham 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 197 

Musick, was born about 1765; married Sally Wynn in Bourbon 
county, Kentucky, where he died. After his death his widow and 
two daughters moved to Clay county, Missouri, where all three of 
them died. Their names are as follows: 

E 1. Nancy, married Captain James Duncan, who was a soldier 
in the War of 1812. They both died near Elm Grove, Clay county, 
]Mo. , leaving a large family of children. 

E 2. Letitia, married Wm. B. Deavenport. They both died 
in Clay county, Missouri, leaving one son: F 1, Wm. Deavenport. 

D 10. Ephraim, son of Sarah Lewis and her husband, Abraham 
3Iusick, was born abcut 1767; married Nancy McMillan. They both 
died on Calvey Creek, Franklin couutj', Mo, They had six children, 
viz. : 

E 1. Robert, was a soldier in the War of 1812; served as a ran- 
ger under Colonel David Musick. He married Roda Walton. They 
are both dead, leaving a family of children. 

E 2. Nancy, married James Lewis, from Virginia; both deadj 
they left children. 

E 3. Larkin, died about seventeen years of age. 

E 4. Marvell, married, and perhaps left children. 

E 5. Hallyard, is dead, and 

E 6. A daughter — name not known. 

D 11. James, son of Sarah Lewis and her husband, Abraham 
Musick, was born about 1769; married Nancy Withinton, in St. 
Louis count}', Missouri. They raised six children, viz. : 

E 1. John Milan; married, has a large family of children, and 
lives in Cole county, Missouri. 

E 2. Eliza, died. 

E 3. Volney C. , married a Miss Crutsinger. He died in St. 
Louis about 1856; has several children. His oldest son is by the 
name of F 1, Lewis Musick. 

E 4. A daughter, married Mr. Clay; lives in Cole county, Mis- 
souri. 

E 5. A daughter, married, and lives in Cole county, Missoui'i. 

E 6. James, lives in Cole county, Missouri. 



198 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



CHAPTER IX. 

DAVID LEWIS, JR., OF SPARTANBURG, S. C. 

C 5. Da\dd Lewis, Jr., son of David Lewis, Sr., of Albemarle 
county, Virginia, was born in Hanover county, Virginia, about 1720. 
He moved, with his father and others of the family, from Hanover 
to Albemarle county about the year 1750. He was a learned and 
talented man, but rather eccentric. He was twice married. His 
first wife was Rebecca Stovall, whom he married in Virginia, and by 
whom he had one daughter, viz. : 

D 1. Mildred, who married Mr. Hale, of Virginia. Nothing is 
known of her or her posterity. 

After the death of his first wife he emigrated to Rutherford 
county, North Carolina, where he purchased land with a view of set- 
tling in said county, but subsequently sold out to his sister, Mrs. 
Anna Willis, and made another settlement in Lancaster District, 
South Carolina, near the Waxhaw Meeting-house, where he married 
Elizabeth Lockhart, his second wife. A few years after this event 
he moved to Spartanburg District, South Carolina, and settled on a 
creek known as " Lawson's Fork," where he died in 1787 and his 
wife in 1796. 

On the records of Albemarle county, Virginia, may be found a 
deed of conveyance fi'om David Lewis and Rebecca, his first wife, 
to Richard Estes, dated the 13th of November, 1766. 

On the records of the same county may be found another deed of 
conveyance from David Lewis, Jr., and his wife, Rebecca, to Alex. 
Baines, dated the 13th day of May, 1762. 

The children of David Lewis, Jr., of Spartanburg, S. C, by his 
second wife, Elizabeth Lockhart, were eleven, viz, : 

D 2. David, born 1763; married Margaret Wood and Margaret 
Ballenger, 

D 3. Elizabeth, born 1764; married Wm. Anderson. 

D 4. Joel, born 1767; married Mary Wood Machen. 

D 5. Pleasant, born about 1769; married Ed Ballenger. 

D 6. 1st Mary, born about 1771; died single. 

D 7. William, born about 1773; died single. 

D 8. John, born about 1775; married Frances Clark. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 19ft 

D 9. Rebecca, born about 1777; married John Morris. 

D 10. Prudence, born about 1779; married Peter Hawkins. 

D 11. 2d Mary, born about 1781; married Mr. Sanford. 

D 12. Capt. James, born about 1784; married Sarali Darby. 

D 2. 3d David Lewis, son of David, of Spartanburg, S. C, and 
his second wife, Elizabetii Lockhart, was born in (perliaps) Lan- 
caster District, South Carolina, in what is known as the Waxhaw 
Settlement, in 17(i3. When a child his father moved and settled in 
Spartanburg District, where he was raised. 

This third David Lewis was twice married; first to Margaret 
\yood in 1790, daughter of Capt. Wm. Wood, of Spartanburg, 
S. C. Her brothers were John, Moses, James and William. John 
was killed by the Tories during the Revolutionary war. Lemick 
Edwards, of Choctaw county, Mississippi; Jesse Edwards, of St, 
Clair county, Alabama, and Wm. D. Culberson, of Winston county, 
Mississippi, married daughters of Moses Wood. 

Margaret Wood, his first wife, died in 1798, and in 1800 he mar- 
ried Margaret Ballenger (a cousin of Edward Eallenger) as his sec- 
ond wife. He had five children by his first wife and six by the sec- 
ond, and died in Spartanburg District, South Carolina, in 1817. 

The following are the names of his eleven children : 

E 1. Jane Terrell Lewis, born 1790; married Samuel Langdon. 

E 2. Elizabeth Lewis, born 1791; married Wm. Bishop, 

E 3. Wm. Wood Lewis, born 1793; never married. 

E 4. Thomas Farrar Lewis, born 1796; married and left 
posterity. 

E 5, Frances Micham Lewis, born 1797; married Mr. Sandford. 

E 6, James Boone Lewis, by second wife, born 1801. 

E 7. Tabitha Lewis, by second wife, born 1803. 

E 8, Margaret Wood Lewis, by second wife, born 1804. 

B 9. Hannah Young Lewis, by second wife, born 1807. 

E 10. Taliaferro Lewis, by second wife, born 1810. 

E 11, Mary Wood Lewis, by second wife, born 1812. 

E 1. Jane Terrell Lewis, daughter of David and Elizabeth, born 
1790; married Samuel Langdon, of Georgia, and emigrated to Hay- 
wood county, Tennessee, where Mr, Langdon died. She then mar- 
ried a second time. She was a beautiful and lovely woman. Noth- 
ing is known respecting her posterity. When last heard from she 
was living in Kentucky. 

E 2. Elizabeth Lewis, daughter of David, was born in 1791, and 
married William Bishop. They moved to Jefferson county, Ala- 



200 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

bama, and settled in Jones Valley, near Ely ton. From there they 
emigrated to West Tennessee and settled on the ' ' Forked Deer, ' ' in 
Haywood or Lauderdale county. They had a daughter by the name 
of Frances. 

E 3. William Wood Lewis, son of David, was born in 1793. He 
was a soldier in the War of 1812. He served in a company of light 
artillery under Capt. James Brannon on Haddrill's Point and at 
Charleston, S. C. He emigrated to Montgomery, Ala., about the 
year 1818. Some 3'ears afterward he moved to Mississippi or 
Louisiana, and has not been heard of since. He never married. 
He was a keen, shrewd man; was a merchant and land specu- 
lator. It is thought by his friends that he was secretly assassinated 
for his money. 

E 4. Thomas Farrar Lewis, was born in 1796 in Spartanburg, 
S. C. He moved to Montgomery, Ala., about the same time that 
his brother William W. did, and engaged in merchandizing. He 
married a widow lady and died in Montgomery, Ala., in 1821, about 
three or four weeks after he was married. He left no posterity. 

E 5. Frances Micham, daughter of David Lewis, of Spartanburg, 
S. C, was born in 1797. She married, in Georgia, a man by the 
name of Sandford and emigrated to West Tennessee in company 
with her brother-in-law, Sam Langdon, and from there she emigrated 
to Kentucky. 

E 6. James Boone Lewis, son of David by his second wife, Mar- 
garet Ballenger, was born in 1801. He was killed by falling from a 
wagon in motion, which ran over and killed him in 1811. 

E 7. Tabitha Lewis, was born in 1803, and died in childhood. 

E 8. Margaret Wood Lewis, daughter of David, was born in 
Spartanburg, S. C, in 1804. She was twice married; first to James 
Roddy, in 1824, of Spartanburg, who was a blacksmith by trade. 
In 1825 they moved to the Hatchie river in West Tennessee, where 
Mr. Roddy died in 1835. In 1836 she emigrated with her little 
children to Boone county, Missouri, and settled near a place known 
as " Providence Landing," on the Missouri river. In 1842 she mar- 
ried James Dunn, and died in 1860. She was a kind mother, an 
affectionate wife and an exemplary Christian. After her death the 
following obituary notice appeared in a Missouri paper: 

" Died, January 18, 1860, in Boone county, Missouri, Mrs. Margaret W. 
Dunn, widow of James Dunn, deceased, at the residence of her son, R. A. 
Roddy, in the fifty-sixth year of her age. She was born in South Carolina, 
September 3, 1804. For more than twenty years she was a member of the 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 201 

Baptist church and died as she had lived, a Christian. She was, indeed, a 
mother in Israel. Her seat in the congregation was seldom seen vacant. 
She lived to see all her children but one united to the church. The 
deceased leaves a large circle of connections and friends, with three sons 
and one daughter to mourn her loss. But our loss is her eternal gain. We 
■do not weep as those who have no hope. 

Sweet is the scene when Christians die; 

When holy souls retire to rest, 
How mildly beams the closing eye, 

How gently heaves the expiring breast! 

B. F. O." 

James Dunn died in 1852. Mrs. Dunn and all her children are 
Baptists. 

Mrs. Margaret W. Dunn had five children by her first husband 
and one by her second, viz. : 

F 1. Nancy Lewis Roddy, born 1825. 

F 2. Francis T. Roddy, born 1827. 

F 3. Louamma Roddy, born 1829, and died 1831. 

F 4. Robert A. Roddy, born 1831. 

F 5. James H. Rodd}', born 1835. 

F 6. William Lewis Dunn, born 1844. 

They all have blue e^'es and light hair except the two oldest, 
whose hair is dark. 

F 1. Nancy L. Rodd}^ married James Ballenger in 1839, by 
whom she had one son. Jas. Ballenger died in 1843, and in 1847 
she married Bradford Lanham, by whom she had four children, and 
died in 1857 of cancer. The following are the names of her five 
children : 

G 1. Thomas Wood Ballenger, born 1842. 

Gr 2. Martha Frances Lanham, born 1847. 

Gr 3. Louamma Lanham, born 1850. 

G 4. James Oliver Lanham, born 1852. 

G 5. John Richard Lanham, born 1855. 

F 2. Frances T. Roddy, was born in 1827. She and her sister, 
Nancy L., have dark hair and blue eyes. She married, in 1842, 
AVashington Dunn, by whom she had three children. Mr. Dunn 
died of cramp colic in 1849. In 1852 she married B. F. Oscar, by 
whom she has two children. Her children are: 

G 1. Mary Margaret Dunn, born 1845. 

G 2. John Robert Dunn, born 1847. 

G 3. Nancy Washington Dunn, born 1850. 

G 4. William Dudley Oscar, born 1853. 



202 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Gr 5. Jesse Bradford Oscar, born 1855. 

F 4. Robert A. Roddy, born 1831, is about five feet eight inclies 
in height and weighs one hundred and sixty pounds. He married 
Sallie G. Tuttle in 1853 and has children, viz.: Gr 1, Wm. Henry; 
G 2, James Gilpin, etc. 

F 5. James H. Roddy, was born in 1835, and is about five feet 
eight inches high, weighing one hundred and thirty-seven pounds, 
with light hair and blue eyes. In 1855 he married Sallie Ballenger 
and had a son born in 1858. 

F 6. William Lewis Dunn, by her last husband, was born in 
1844, and is a clerk in a dr}' goods store. 

E 9. Hannah Young Lewis, daughter of David and his wife, 
Margaret Ballenger, was born in Spartanburg, S. C, in 1807. In 
1824 she married Alberry John Wingo. She and Mr. Wingo are 
members of the Baptist church, and those of their children who have 
attached themselves to the church are Baptists. They reside near 
Mount Lebanon, Spartanburg District, S. C. Mr. Wingo is a farmer. 
They had eight children, viz. : 

F 1. Mary Wingo, was born 1825, and died in 1825. 

F 2. Margaret Lewis Wingo, born 1827, and died in 1828. 

F 3.. John Washington Wingo, born 1829. 

F 4. Thomas Simpson Wingo, born 1831. 

F 5. Demarquis Lafayette Wingo, born in 1835. 

F 6. Martha Ann Wingo, born in 1838. 

F 7. Ransom Marion Wingo, born in 1841. 

F 8. Alberry Decater Wingo, born in 1843. 

John Washington Wingo married Rosa Caroline Caldwell and has 
children, viz.: G 1, Elizabeth Jane; G 2, Wm. Preston; G 3, James 
Young, etc. 

Demarquis L. Wingo married Mrs. Martha Tapp and has children, 
viz. : G 1, Alexander, etc. 

E 10. Taliaferro Lewis, son of David and his wife, Margaret 
Ballenger, was born in 1810, and died in childhood. 

E 11. Mary Wood Lewis, daughter of David and Margaret 
Ballenger, was born 1812; died in childhood. 

D 3. Elizabeth Lewis, daughter of David Lewis and his wife, 
Elizabeth Lockhart, was born about 1765. She married William 
Anderson and moved to Georgia, where she left a numerous pos- 
terity. The following are the names of three of her children : 

E 1, Lewis Anderson; E 2, Polly Anderson, died young; E 3,, 
Jane Anderson, married a Mr. Cane or McCane, etc. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 203 

D 4. Joel Lewis, son of David and his wife, Elizabeth Lockhart, 
was born in Spartanburg, S. C, in 1767. In 1798 he married Mary 
Wood Machen, of Greenville, S. C, and died in Spartanburg District, 
South Carolina, in 1815. After his death his widow married David 
Golightly, of Spartanburg, S. C. 

D 4. Joel Lewis, left but two children, viz. : 

E 1. Frances Machen, born 1799; married John S. Rowland. 

E 2. Dr. John Wood, born 1801; married Maria Earle. 

E 1. Frances M., married, in 1816, John Sharpe Rowland, her 
second cousin, a son of Thomas Rowland and Mildred Lewis, his 
wife, of Greenville, S. C. John S. was a merchant at Spartanburg 
C. H. , S. C. , for many j-ears, and tax collector of the county. He 
finally moved to what is now Bartow county, Georgia, near Carters- 
ville, on the Etowah river, and was the superintendent of the Western 
& Atlanta Railroad at the time of his death, which occurred in 1863 
at Atlanta, Ga. 

Frances M. Rowland had eleven children, viz. : 

F 1, Mary Lewis Rowland, born 1818; married Jo. Michael and 
Dr. S. C. Edgeworth. 

F2. Mildred Emily Rowland, born 1819; married H. H. 
Thompson. 

F 3. John Lewis Rowland, born 1822; died in infancy. 

F 4. Eliza Frances Rowland, born 1824. 

F 5. Joel Thomas Rowland, born 1827; married Miss Keith. 

F 6. John Leonidas Rowland, born 1830. 

F 7. William Lewis Rowland, born 1833; married Serene J. 
Dillard. 

F 8. Joseph Preston Rowland, born 1835; died in infancy. 

F 9. Harriet Elizabeth Rowland, born 1837; died in infancy. 

F 10. Joseph Henry Rowland, born 1839; died in infancy. 

F 11. Robert Hayne Rowland, born 1842. 

F 1. Mary L. Rowland, married Joseph Michael in 1836, a mer- 
chant at Spartanburg C. H., S. C. She had two children, both of 
whom died in infancy. Mr. Jo. Michael died in 1840, and in 1851 
she married Dr. S. C. Edgeworth, a relative of the authoress. Miss 
Maria Edgeworth, of Ireland. They reside in Cass county, Georgia. 
For a sketch of the Edgeworth family the reader is referred to 
another part of this work. 

F 2. Mildred Emily Rowland, married in 1838 Henry H. 
Thompson, Esq., a lawyer of Spartanburg, S. C, son of Richard 
Thompson, known in common parlance as * ' Gentleman Dick Thomp- 



204 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

son," who died near Spartanburg Village, S. C. Mrs. Mildred E. 
Thompson died at Spartanburg C. H. , in 1869. She left six chil- 
dren, viz. : 

Gr 1, Henry Hopson, born 1840; married Emily G. West, of 
Charleston, S. C. They had issue, viz. : H 1, Charles West, born 
1866; H 2, Henry H., born 1870. 

G 2. John Sharpe Rowland, born 1842; married Martha Jane 
Clawson, of Yorkville, S. C. They have issue, viz. : H 1, Wm. 
Clawson, born 1866; H 2, Rowland, born 1869; H 3, Mildred Emilj-, 
born 1871; H 4, Henry Waddy, born 1874, and H 5, Lewis Craw- 
ford, born 1878. 

G 3. Mary Frances, born 1847; married Hazel Scaife; issue, 
five children, viz.: H 1, Mildred Emily, born 1866; H 2, Eugene, 
born 1869; H 3, Hazel, born 1872; H 4, Agnes, born 1874, died; 
H 5, Rowland, born 1878. 

G 4. Mildred Emily, born 1849; married Thomas Nowell; issue, 
three children, viz. : HI, Lionel Chalmers, died an infant; H 2, 
John Rowland, and H 3, Egbert. 

G 5. Willie Waddy, born 1850; married Jessie Means; had 
issue, viz.: H 1, Edgar; H 2, Lewis; H 3, Bertie; H 4, Rowland; 
H 5, Jessie. 

G 6. Eugenia Edgeworth, born 1852; married Ladson Mills 
(grandnephew of Mourning Mills, who married Henry G. Lewis); 
had issue, viz.: H 1, Ladson, died; H 2, Eugenia; H 3, Ethel; 
H 4, Baby. 

Henry H. Thompson's children and grandchildren all reside in 
Spartanburg, S. C. 

F 5. Joel Thomas, son of John Sharpe Rowland, married in 1852 
Louisa J., daughter of Hon. Charles F. Keith, of Athens, McMinn 
county, Tenn. After his marriage he settled in McMinn count}', 
Tennessee, where he died in 1856, leaving two children, viz.: G 1, 
John S. Rowland, and G 2, Charles Keith Rowland. 

F 7. William Lewis Rowland, married in 1855 Serene J. Dil- 
lard, from Laurens county. South Carolina. He is settled on the 
Etowah river, in Cass county, Georgia, farming. 

E 2. Dr. John Wood Lewis, son of Joel, was born in Spartan- 
burg, S. C, in 1801. In 1835 he married Maria Earle, daughter of 
Samuel Earle, of Pendleton, S. C, and sister of Judge Baylis J. 
Earle, of Greenville, S. C. Than Judge B. J. Earle, there are but 
few lawyers in the State more profound, erudite and talented. The 
Earle family was one among the most distinguished of the State as 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 205 

lawyers, doctors, members of the Legislature, members of Con- 
gress, etc. 

Dr. John W. Lewis was quite a talented man. He had been hon- 
ored with a seat in the State Legislature of South Carolina from 
Spartanburg District, and during the Confederate war he was a 
member of the Confederate Congress from Georgia, and was a 
delegate to the Cincinnati Convention. He had been for some years 
the superintendent of a railroad in Georgia, and was a very distin- 
guished Baptist divine. He died in Bartow count}', Georgia, after 
the close of the Confederate war. He left seven children, marked 
F, viz. : 

F 1. Harriet Frances, born 1836; married in 1856 Colonel Jas. 
R. Brown, a lawyer of distinction, of Canton, Cherokee count}', Ga., 
and a relative of Governor Brown, of Georgia. He presided as a 
judge of the Circuit Court of his district for several years. He 
had four children, viz. : 

G 1. Sallie Rice Brown, died in 1888. 

G 2. John Wood Brown, a farmer near Carters\ille, Ga. 

G 3. George R. Brown, is the Solicitor-General of the Blue 
Ridge Circuit, and resides at Canton, Ga. 

G 4. Joseph E. Brown, is in the railroad business at Atlanta, Ga. 

F 2. Pickens R. , son of Dr. John W. Lewis, born in 1838 ; lives 
at Cass Station, Bartow county, Ga. 

F 3. Mary W. Lewis, born 1840; married John D. Thomas; had 
one son and died. Mr. Thomas resides at Cass Station, Ga. 

F 4. Baylis J. Lewis, born 1844; is in the Lunatic Asylum at 
Milledgeville, Ga. 

F 5. Mildred Earle Lewis, born 1847; married David C. Mastin, 
and resides near Kansas City, Mo. 

F 6. Edward E. Lewis, is conductor on a railroad, Rome, Ga. 

F 7. John Wood Lewis, resides at Marietta, Ga. 

D 5. Pleasant, daughter of David Lewis and his wife, Elizabeth 
Lockhart, of Spartanburg, S. C, was born about 1769. She mar- 
ried Edward Ballenger, of Spartanburg. He was over six feet in 
stature ; was a Revolutionary soldier, and did good service for his 
country. He was wounded at the siege of Augusta ; was in the bat- 
tle of the Cowpens and many others. He was kind and hospitable 
to his friends, brave and fearless in battle, and uncompromising 
with a Tory. He and his wife died in Spartanburg District, South 
Carolina. They had nine children, viz. : 

E 1. James, died single; E 2, Margaret, died single; E 3, John 



206 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Lewis ; E 4, Presley ; E 5, Larkin ; E <6, Rebecca, died single ; E 7, 
La\inia; E 8, Edward, died single, and E 9, Elizabeth. 

E 3. John Lewis Ballenger, married Mahala Foster, daughter of 
Richard Foster, of Spartanburg, S. C. ; had ten children, and died in 
Pickens District, South Carolina, near Bachelor's Retreat. The fol- 
lowing are the names of his children and grandchildren : 

F 1. James Alexander Ballenger, son of John Lewis Ballenger, 
married, and resides in Greenville District, South Carolina, near 
Camp Ground P. 0., and has children, viz.: G 1, Albert Woodfin; 
G 2, William Henry ; G 3, John James. 

F 2. Frances Ballenger, daughter of John L., married Calvin 
Hunt, and resides near Marietta, Cobb county, Ga., and has chil- 
dren, viz.: G 1, Elizabeth Mahala; G 2, Martha Ann; G 3, John 
Thomas; G 4, Zach Ballenger; G 5, Wm. Lewis, etc. 

F 3. Edward Ballenger, son of John L., married a Miss 

Ware, and resides near Bachelor" s Retreat, Pickens District, S. C. 
They have the following-named children: 

G 1. Susan M. ; G 2, Mary Jane; G 3, Josephine; G 4, Tabitha, 
etc. 

F 4. William Ballenger, son of John L., married a Miss Dixon, 
and resides near Biichelor' s Retreat, Pickens District, S. C. They 
have children, as follows: 

G 1. James Franklin; G 2, Nancy Ann; G 3, Rebecca Elizabeth, 
and G 4, John Simpson. 

F 5. Pleasant Ballenger, daughter of John L. ; F 6, Tabitha 
Ballenger; F 7, Judith Ann Ballenger. 

F 8. Angeline Ballenger, married W. R. Gilbert, and resides 
near Bachelor's Retreat, and has children as follows: G 1, Joseph 
H., etc. 

F 9. John Richard Ballenger, son of John L. ; F 10, Jane 

Mahala. 

E 4. Rebecca Ballenger, daughter of Ed. and Pleasant, died 
young in Spartanburg, S. C. 

E 5. Presley Ballenger, son of Ed. and Pleasant, married Nancy 
Dodd, daughter of John Dodd, of Spartanburg, S. C. They had 
six children, and both died in Spartanburg, S. C. ; he in 1835, and 
she in 1831. They raised six children, as follows: 

F 1. Mary Ballenger, born 1822; married Captain Calvin 
McDowell; resides nea'r New Prospect, Spartanburg, S. C, and has 
children as follows: G 1, Joseph H. ; G 2, Nancy A. ; G 3, Rebecca; 
G 4, Martha, etc. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 207 

F 2. Martha Ballenger, second daughter of Presley Ballenger, 
^vas born in 1823. She married Thomas N. Smith; had six chil- 
dren, and died in Floyd county, Georgia, in 1853. The names of 
her children are: G 1, Mary E; G 2, John P; G 3, Presley Ballen- 
ger; G 4, Rebecca; G 5, Martha, and G 6, Nancy. 

F 3. Julias Benson Ballenger, son of Presley, was born in 1825; 
resides in Floyd county, Georgia. 

F 4. Dr. Marcus Rowland Ballenger, son of Presley, was born 
in 1827. In 1859 he married Aphiah Moore, and resides near Floyd 
Spring, Flo^^d count}', Ga. 

F 5. Elizabeth Ballenger, daughter of Presley, was born in 1829. 
She married Thomas N. Smith, a farmer, of Floyd county, Georgia; 
the same man that married her sister Martha. Elizabeth has chil- 
dren, viz. : G 1, Marcus Ballenger, etc. 

F 6. Rebecca Ballenger, daughter of Presley, born 1 831 ; mar- 
ried Aspacio Earle, a farmer, of Floyd county, Georgia. She has 
children as follows: G 1, Elias B. ; G 2, Ida, etc. 

E 6. Larkin Ballenger, son of Edward and Pleasant Ballenger, 
his wife, married Elizabeth Wood, daughter of John Wood, of 
Spartanburg, S. C. Larkin Ballenger resides in Spartanburg Dis- 
trict, South Carolina. The following are the names of his children 
and grandchildren: 

F 1. Henry M., married a Miss Cook, and has children as 

follows: G 1, Alexander; G 2, Mary E., etc. 

F 2. William, son of Larkin Ballenger, married a Miss 

Sceay, and resides near Mt. Lebanon, Spartanburg District, S. C. 

F 3. Levina, daughter of Larkin Ballenger, married Angus 
Morris; resides near Gunter's Landing, Marshall county, Ala., and 
has children, viz. : G 1, Edward, etc. 

F 4. Jabez. 

F 5. Elizabeth, married Madison Wood ; resides in Mt. Lebanon, 
S. C, and has children, viz. : G 1, Marietta, etc. 

F 6. Rebecca, the youngest child of Larkin Ballenger, resides 
near Mt. Lebanon, Spartanburg District, S. C. 

E 7. Levina, daughter of Edward and Pleasant Ballenger, mar- 
ried Henry Cothran, son of Judah Cothran, and died in Spartan- 
burg, S. C, without issue. 

E 8, Edward Ballenger, Jr. , son of Edward, died single. 

E 9. Elizabeth, daughter of Edward and Pleasant Ballenger, 
married Wm. White, and resides a widow, near Mt. Lebanon, Spar- 
tanburg, S. C. , with six children, viz. : 



208 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

F 1. Edward B., married Frances Wilford. 

F 2. James S. ; F 3, Andrew P., died; F 4, Wm. Ransom; F 5, 
John Thomas, died; F 6, Harriet E. 

D 6. John Lewis, son of David and his wife, Elizabeth Lock- 
hart, was born about 1775. He married Frances Clark, by whom he 
had three children ; two of them died in infancy. After the death 
of John Lewis in 1815, Frances, his widow, married David Golightly, 
of Spartanburg, S. C. John Lewis raised but one son, viz. : 

E 1. Captain Joel Lewis, was born in Spartanburg, S. C, in 
1796. He served in the War of 1812, in Captain E. Clement's 
company. Major Dawkin's Battalion, from September to January as 
a private, and from January until peace was made as orderly in the 
hospital. After the close of the war he acted as lieutenant and 
captain of the Spartanburg Artillery, which company was pro- 
nounced by the Governor, to be one of the three best drilled com- 
panies in the State. 

In 1821 Captain Joel Lewis married Mrs. Ann Charlotte Krider, 
and died near Gadsden, Cherokee county, Ala. He and his wife, 
and his two daughters, Dorothy and Josephine, are members of the 
Methodist church. The following are the names of his children and 
grandchildren, viz. : 

F 1. David Golightly Lewis, was born in 1822 and married, in 
1857, Elizabeth Hutchinson, and has children, viz. : G 1, Thomas 
Augustus, born 1858, etc. 

F 2. Frances Golightly, daughter of Joel Lewis, was born in 

*1824. In 1841 she married L. Kennedy. They are both members of 

the Presbyterian church. They have the following-named children: 

G 1. Henry, born 1842; G 2, Elizabeth Ann, born 1844; G 3, 
Franklin Bowden, born 1846; G 4, James Butler, born 1849; G 5, 
Robert Pierce, born 1853; G 6, John Lewis, born 1855, etc. 

F 3. Thomas Poole Lewis, son of Joel, was born in 1826 and 
married Mary Jane Goddy. They live in Memphis, Tenn., and 
have children, viz. : 

G 1. Joel Jerome; G 2, Thomas; G 3, Elizabeth, etc. 

F 4. Dorothy Pickenpack Lewis, daughter of Joel, was born in 
1828, and in 1847 she married Thomas Hollingsworth. They have 
children as follows: 

G 1. Mary Josephine, born 1848; G 2, Jacob Franklin, born 
1850; G 3, Thomas Lewis, born 1852; G 4, William David, born 
1853; G 5, Augustus Summerfield, born 1855; G 6, Ann Charlotte, 
born 1857; G 7, Calista Florence, born 1859, etc. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 209 

F 5. Mary Josephine, daughter of Joel Lewis, was born in 1831 
and in 1851 she married W. P. Hollingsworth. They have children 
viz.: Gr 1, Ann Dorothy, born 1852; Gr 2, Laura Josephine, born 
1855; G 3, Kate May, born 1857, etc. 

F 6. William John Lewis, son of Joel, born 1833, and died in 
1853 at Memphis, Tenn. 

F 7. Marcus Jerome Lewis, born 1835, and died at Canton, Ga., 
1850. 

F 8. Augustus Frazier Lewis, born 1837. 

F 9. Eliza Catherine Lewis, born 1840, and died in 1840. 

D 7. Rebecca Lewis, daughter of David and his wife, Elizabeth 
Lockhart, was born about 1777. She married John Morris. She and 
Mr. Morris were members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and so 
are all their children who have made a profession of religion. He died 
in Coosa county, Alabama, in 1845, and she in Talladega county, 
Alabama, in 1855. They raised five children, viz.: 

E 1. Prudence, born 1799; E 2, Letty, born about 1801; E 3, 
Rebecca, born about 1803; E 4, Baylis, born 1807; E 5, Andrew 
Jackson, born about 1809. 

E 1. Prudence, the oldest child of Rebecca and John Morris, 
was born about 1799. She was twice married; first to Martin Hag- 
wood, or Haggard, b}^ whom she had one son: F 1, Martin, who died 
a young man. Her second husband was John Starlin, by whom she 
had one son, viz. : F 2, Francis, born about 1827. He is about six 
feet high, with light hair and blue eyes, and is a clerk in a dry goods 
store in Montgomery, Ala. 

Mrs. Prudence Starlin died in Bibb county, Alabama, in 1833. 
She was a very pious and exemplary member of the Methodist 
church. 

E 2. Letty Morris, daughter of John and Rebecca, was born 
about 1801. She was a member of the Methodist church. About 
the year 1820 she married Duncan Johnson, by whom she had three 
children, and died in 1835 in Bibb county, Alabama. She was a 
kind mother and an affectionate wife, and died as she had lived, an 
humble Christian. The following are the names of her three 
children : 

F 1. Joshua West, born 1821. 

F 2. William Jones, born 1823. 

F 3. Mary Freeman, born about 1825. 

Joshua W. Johnson married, in 1845, Maria Blake, and resides 
near Scottsville, Bibb county, Ala. He is six feet in height, weighs 
14 



•ilO GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

one hundred and seventy pounds, with dark hair, black eyes and fair 
complexion. He and all the family are farmers. In 1859 he had 
eight living children, viz. : 

G 1. Hannibal Latimer, born 1847. 

G 2. Margaret Angeline, born 1848. 

G 3. Thea Desha Frances, born 1850. 

Gr 4. Rebecca Rosalie, born 1852. 

G 5. Luretta Maria, born 1855, 

G 6. Edward Austin, born 1856. 

G 7. Doake Van Buren, born 1858, ) ^^j^g 

G 8. Dennis Washington, born 1858, f 

F 2. William J. Johnson, married Jane West and resides near 
Brush Valley, Bienville Parish, La. They have seven or more chil- 
dren, as follows: 

G 1. Elbert Lafayette, born in 1843. 

G 2. William Alfonder, born 1845. 

G 3. Hilliard Franklin, born 1848. 

G 4. John Akens, born 1850. 

G 5. Mary Melvina, born 1852. 

G 6. Martha Caroline, born 1855. 

G 7. Isabella Catherine, born 1857, etc. 

F 3. Mary Freeman Johnson, married, in 1844, John Rice, by 
whom she had two children, and died in 1849. The names of her 
children are : 

G 1. Mary Josephine, born 1847, and 

G 2. Pleasant Jackson, born in 1849. 

E 3. Baylis Morris, son of John and Rebecca, was born in 1807; 
married Jane Hill and is a farmer residing near Berlin, Ashley 
county. Ark. The names of their children are as follows: 

F 1. Rufus King; F 2, John Hill; F 3, Rebecca Caroline, mar- 
ried G. W. Snapp, Talladega, Ala. ; F 4, Margaret; F 5, Andrew 
Jackson; F 6, James William; F 7, Robert Cannon; F 8, Fannie, 
F 9, Josephine, and F 10, Missouri Alabama. 

G. W. Snapp is a farmer and stock-raiser. His parents live in 
Severe county, Tennessee. 

E 4. Rebecca Morris, daughter of Rebecca and John, was born 
about 1809. She married Jacob Johnson, had seven children and 
died near Fayetteville, Talladega county, Ala., in 1849. The names 
of her children are : 

F 1. Mitchell; F 2, Porter, died; F 3, James Davis; F 4, Russell; 
P 5, John; F 6, Jane, and F 7, Robert, died. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 211 

E 5. Andrew Jackson Morris, son of Rebecca and John, was 
born about 1811. He married, in 1854, Mrs. Pearce, whose maiden 
name was Charity Davis, by whom he had one child. His wife and 
child are both dead. His child died nameless. He is a farmer 
residing in Bibb county, Alabama. 

D 8 and 9. 1st Mary Lewis and William Lewis, children of David 
and his wife, Elizabeth Lockhart, died single in Spartanburg, S. C. 

D 10. Prudence Lewis, daughter of David and his wife, Eliza- 
beth Lockhart, was born in Spartanburg, S. C, about the year 
1779. She married Peter Hawkins and moved to West Tennessee 
about 1824, and settled in Haywood county, where Mr. Hawkins 
died. She was living in Haywood county in 1840, a widow. She 
afterward emigrated to Illinois. They raised four children, viz.: 

E 1. Rebecea, married a Mr. Lucas. 

E 2. Rev. John Hawkins, a Methodist preacher. 

E 3. Rev. James Hawkins, a Methodist preacher. 

E 4. William Hawkins. 

D 11. 2d Mary, married Mr. Sandford and went to Tennessee. 

D 12. Capt. James Lewis, son of David and his wife, Elizabeth 
Lockhart, was born in Spartanburg District, South Carolina, in 
1784. He volunteered in the War of 1812 for six months, and 
entered the army at Lipp's old field in Union District, South Caro- 
lina, September 29, 1814. He was discharged at Charleston, S. C, 
in February, 1815, after peace was made. He served as First Lieu- 
tenant in Capt. E. Clement's company at Haddrill's Point, Charles- 
ton, and John's Island. After the war he was captain of a militia 
company in South Carolina. He was an honest, good citizen. 

In 1813 he married Sarah Darby in Spartanburg District, South 
Carolina. A few years afterward he moved to Georgia and settled 
near Cumming, in Forsyth county, where he died. He raised eight- 
children, viz. : 

E 1. James W., born about 1815 in Spartanburg District, South 
Carolina; married Emeline Henry, had four children and died in 
Hancock county, Georgia, in 1845. The following are the names of 
his children: 

F 1. Thomas; F 2, William; F 3, Harriet; F 4, Mary. 

E 2. Hamilton W., son of Captain James Lewis, was born about 
1818 in South Carolina. He married Dena Pearson and has the fol- 
lowing-named children : 

F 1. Elsy W. ; F 2, Nancy; F 3, James M., etc. 

E 3. Judge Elsy W. Lewis, son of Captain James, was born in 



212 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Spartanburg District, South Carolina, in 1822. He was in the 
Floridian and Mexican wars, but was in no engagement. Although 
elected as judge of one of the petty courts of Forsyth county, Georgia, 
he was by profession a farmer. His post-office is Gumming, Ga. 
He married Martha Ann Hawkins, by whom he has the following- 
named children: 

F 1. Celia Octavia; F 2, Franklin Pierce; F 3, James Buchanan. 

E 4. Harriet, daughter of Captain James Lewis, married Henry 
Hawkins, resides in Forsyth county, Georgia, and has the following- 
named children: 

F 1. Martha V. ; F 2, Julia; F 3, Lafayette, died, etc. 

E 5. Mary Lewis, daughter of Captain James, married Wm. L. 
Manning and did reside in Clarke county, Mississippi, but have 
moved (perhaps) to Louisiana. Their children' s names are as follows : 

F 1. Harrison; F 2, Andrew, etc. 

E 6. John A. Lewis, son of Captain James, married Elizabeth 
Dickson. 

E 7. William W. Lewis, son of Captain James. 

E 8. Nancy, daughter of Captain James, married John L. Haw- 
kins, resides in Forsyth county, Georgia, and has children, viz. : 

F 1. Claiborne Hawkins; F 2, Alexander Stephens Hawkins, etc. 

D 11. 2d Mary Lewis, daughter of David by his second wife, 
Elizabeth Lockhart, was born in Spartanburg District, South Caro- 
lina, about 1781. She married a Mr. Sandford and moved to 

Tennessee, and settled about eighteen miles from Nashville. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 213 



CHAPTEE X. 

JOHN LEWIS, OF ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VA. 

C 6. John Lewis, son of David and his wife, Miss Terrell, 

was born in Hanover county, Virginia, about the year 1728, where 
he was raised. As a citizen he was much esteemed by all who 
knew him. As a husband, father and brother, he was kind and 
affectionate, and was a favorite among his sisters; hence, most of 
them named a son after him. He was twice married ; first, to Sarah 
Taliaferro, in 1750, by whom he raised nine children. His first wife 
having died in 1769, he married, as his second wife, Susan Clark- 
son, sister of Manoah Clarkson, of Albemarle county, Virginia, by 
whom he had three children, but only raised one. It is not known 
what 3'ear he left Hanover county, but it appears that he was living 
in Amelia county in 1759, as some of his children were born in that 
county. He afterward settled in Albemarle county where his father, 
brothers and sisters had previously settled. He remained in Albe- 
marle county until just before the Revolutionary war, when he emi- 
grated to, and settled in, Rutherford county. North Carolina. David, 
his father, having died in 1779, and after his estate was wound up, 
John returned to Albemarle county to attend to the division of said 
estate and died there in 1784. 

The name of Taliaferro was derived from the Latin words talis 
and ferrum, or from the Italian words tagliari and ferro; both the 
Latin and Italian signifying to cut with iron. It would appear from 
this cognomination that the original stock were great fighters. Two 
brothers of the Taliaferro family emigrated from Italy to Virginia 
in the early colonial times, and settled in the neighborhood of Will- 
iamsburg. Only one of them left male descendants. Mr. Jetferson 
describes the family in Virginia as wealthy and respectable. Chan- 
cellor Wythe, who signed the Declaration of Independence, married 
a Miss Taliaferro and a Miss Lewis. Sarah Taliaferro, the first 
wife of John Lewis, of Albemarle county, Virginia, had a sister 
Margaret who married Hiram Gaines, and David Nimmo, of the 
same county, married Gaines' daughter. J. S. Pilcher, of Nash- 
ville, Tenn., is engaged tracing up the Taliaferro family and designs 
publishing the result in book form some day. 



214 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

There were seven brothers of the Gaines family who originally 
emigrated from Wales to Virginia. The grandfather of General 
E. P. Gaines married a sister of Judge Edmund Pendleton. The 
mother of General E. P. Gaines was a daughter of John Strother. 

The Gaines, Strothers, Madisons, Lewises, Taliaferros, Pendle- 
tons, Taylors and McDowells were all related by marriage. 

John Lewis, who married Sarah Taliaferro and Susan Clarkson, 
raised nine children by his first wife ; had three, but raised only one, 
by his second wife. Their names were, viz. : 

D 1. Kobert, born in 1752; died single in Kentucky in 1799. 

D 2. Taliaferro, born in 1755; died single in Virginia in 1810. 

D 3. John, born in 1757; married Ann Berry Earle and died in 
Georgia. 

D 4. Mildred McCoy, born in 1759; married Thomas Kowland 
and died in South Carolina. 

D 5. Charles Crawford, born in 1761 ; married Elizabeth Russell 
and died in North Carolina. 

D 6. Jesse Pitman, born in 1763; married Nancy Clarkson and 
died in Virginia. 

D 7. Richard, born in 1765; married Sarah Miller and died in 
South Carolina. 

D 8. Henry Graves, born 1767; married Mourning Mills and 
died in North Carolina. 

D 9. Frances Rhodes, born in 1767; married William Twitty and 
died in North Carolina. 

D 10. Su.san, born 1772; died in childhood. 

D 11. Julius, born in 1774; died in childhood. 

D 12. David Jackson, born in 1774; married Martha Baker and 
died in Kentucky. 

The 8th and 9th, 11th and 12th were twins. 

D 1. Robert Lewis, son of John and his wife, Sarah Taliaferro, 
was a soldier of the Revolutionary war. He was one of a company 
that went from Virginia to South Carolina during the war against 
the Tories. Some gentleman came up from South Carolina and 
offered a negro to each of the Virginians who would go against the 
Tories. A company was formed of about one hundred mounted 
men who proceeded to South Carolina and divided into small parties 
and killed about eighty Tories, mostly at their own houses, under 
the direction of a committee appointed by the South Carolinians. 
The company was paid off in negroes taken from the farms of the 
Tories that were killed. Robert Lewis got a negro girl by the name 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



215 



of Chloe who produced a large famil}^ of negroes. He was a mem- 
ber of a volunteer company raised by Captain, afterward General, 
James Miller, of Rutherford county, North Carolina, and was at the 
siege of Augusta, Ga. He died, a bachelor, at the house of Major 
John Martin, in Clark county, Kentucky, in 1799. His will can be 
found on record in said county. By his will he set eight negroes 
free and gave one to John L. Martin, one to James T. Martin and 
one to Robert B. Martin, To John L. 3Iartin, James T. Mai-tin 
and Robert B. Martin he gave 1,500 acres of laud due him by Will- 
iam Lewis, of Nashville, Tenn. To Elizabeth Martin, wife of Major 
John Martin, he gave the money arising from the sale of his horse, 
bridle and saddle. To Sally Rowland, daughter of Thomas Rowland, 
he gave £80. To Polly Lewis, daughter of Jesse Lewis, of Albe- 
marle county, Virginia, the oldest sons of his brother John, the two 
oldest sons of his brother Charles and the two oldest sons of his 
brother Henry G. Lewis, he gave 566 acres of land, the hire of cer- 
tain negroes and some other property. To Polly Lewis, daughter 
of his brother Henry G. Lewis, he gave that part of his father's 
estate that fell to him after the death of his stepmother. He left 
Jacob Fishback, John Martin, John L. Martin and James T. Martin 
as his executors. He was interred in the family buryiug-ground of 
Major John Martin. 

D 2. Taliaferro Lewis, son of John, was born in 175-4 and died a 
bachelor, at the residence of his brother, Jesse Pitman, one mile west 
of the University of Virginia, in xA.lbemarle county, Virginia, where 
he was interred in the family burying-ground, since which time it 
has passed to the proprietorship of one of the Randolph family. 
The graveyard is enclosed with a stone wall, and a plain marble 
slab, erected by his brother, Jesse Pitman, points out his tomb with 
the following inscription upon it: 



IN MEMORY OF 

TALIAFERRO LEWIS, 

A Veteran of the Revolution. 

Born February 4, 1754, 

And died July 12, 1810. 



A brother's love 
Erects this with a sigh; 

A brother's hope 
Still follows thee on high. 



216 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Taliaferro Lewis made his will in 1809. After willing forty dol- 
lars to his aunt, Lucy Lewis (wife of James Lewis), for care and 
attention to him, the balance of the money for his whole estate to 
be equally divided between his two nieces, Jennie Barksdale, wife 
of Nelson Barksdale, and Polly Clarkson, wife of Julius Clarkson, 
daughters of his brother, Jesse P. Lewis, of Albemarle county, 
Virginia. 

Taliaferro Lewis was a soldier of the Revolutionary war. He 
volunteered soon after the commencement of the war and attached 
himself to the Northern Army. In one of the battles (perhaps) at 
Germantown he and his whole regiment were taken prisoners and 
sent to Philadelphia, where they were for months confined in prison. 
While there they were starved and otherwise cruelly treated by their 
British captors, from the effects of which many died. His hands 
and arms bore evidence of that cruelty to his grave. While in prison 
the officer in command would call them to the walls of the prison and 
make them catch in their hats the boiling hot soup upon which they 
were fed, and then designed!}' pour the soup over their hands and 
wrists so as to scald them, which, after healing, left horrible scars 
upon their arms and hands. A few years before his death he visited 
his brothers and sisters in Rutherford county, North Carolina, after 
which he returned to Albemarle count}' and died. Although he and 
his brother, Robert Lewis, took St. Paul' s advice and never married, 
yet they were highly esteemed and respected by all who knew them 
as faithful defenders of their country's rights and liberties in the 
day that tried men' s souls. 

D 3. Major John Lewis, the third son of John Lewis and his first 
wife, Sarah Taliaferro, was born in 1757. He volunteered under 
Captain Marks, of Charlottesville, Va. , soon after the commencement 
of the Revolutionary war, and continued in the service until peace 
was made. At one time during the war it was three years that he 
never slept on a bed nor was on horse-back. Part of the time he 
belonged to the regiment that was detailed as a bodj'-guard to Gen- 
eral Lafayette. He was in all the principal battles fought in New 
Jersey, Pennsylvania and Virginia. He was at the battles of Mon- 
mouth, Brandywine, Stony Point, Germantown, and lastly was 
present at the ever-memorable surrender of Lord Cornwallis at 
Yorktown. 

He was a blacksmith by trade, and after the close of the Revolu- 
tionary war he emigrated and settled on Mountain Creek, in Ruther- 
ford county. North Carolina, adjoining the farm owned by his 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 217 

brother Charles. At this time there were but four offices in the 
county that were within the gift of the citizens. 

Major John Lewis was elected sheriff; Charles Lewis was elected 
as a member of the Legislature, and Colonel Kichard Lewis was 
elected clerk of the court. 

Out of four offices of the county three of them were filled by the 
three Lewis brothers. Some years afterward Fed. Alley was elected 
sheriff of Rutherford county. Major John Lewis and others went on 
his bond as securities. Fed. Alley failed, and his securities had the 
bond to pay. This broke up Major John Lewis and the other securi- 
ties. He then sold out his farm to Ben Hyder, Jr. , and settled again 
on Green river, in Rutherford county. About the year 1786 he mar- 
ried Ann Berry Earle, sister of General Baylis Earle and a daughter 
of John Earle and his wife, Thomasin Berry. Ann Berry Earle was 
born in 1763. Her brother. General John Baylis Earle, was born 
in 1766. Her other brother, Washington Earle, was born in 17 — . 
Major Samuel Taylor was a soldier of the Revolution, and married 
a Miss Cannon. His children were: 

1. Joseph Taylor, married Nancy, daughter of David Sloan. 

2. John Taylor, was a member of Congress from South Carolina. 

3. Samuel, died in Alabama. 

4. Reese Taylor, of the firm of Lewis, Taylor & Co. , Mobile, Ala. 

5. Sarah, married General John Baylis Earle, of Greenville, S. C, 
who was for many years a member of Congress from South Carolina, 
and Major-General of that State. 

6. Mrs. Hackett, of Habersham county, Georgia, and 

7. Mrs. BoUes, of Mobile, Ala. 

Colonel Joseph Taylor and his wife, Nancy Sloan, had the fol- 
lowing children : 

1. David S., of Pendleton, S. C, married Sally, daughter of 
Zack. Taliaferro. 

2. Ellen C, married Mr. Poe, of Pendleton, S. C. 

3. Dr. Wm. S., of Mobile, Ala., married a daughter of H. B. 
Holcombe. 

4. Dr. Joseph, of Harrison county, Texas, married a Miss 
Kneeland, of Augusta, Ga. 

5. John Baylis Earle, of Harrison county, Texas, married Miss 
Hubbard, of South Carolina. 

6. Samuel J., of Harrison county, Texas, married Miss Lester. 

7. Susan M., married Jesse Payne Lewis, of Pendleton, S. C, 
son of Major John Lewis and his wife, Ann Berr}- Earle. 



218 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



The children of General John Baylis Earle are, viz. : 

1. Eleanor, married John Taliaferro Lewis, of Pendleton, S. C.^ 
son of Major John Lewis and Ann B. Earle. 

2. Eliza, married B. F. Sloan, of Pendleton, S. C. 

3. Sarah, married Geo. Seaborn, of Pendleton, S. C. 

4. Hannah, married Thomas Harrison, of Greenville, S. C. 

5. Mary, married Mr. Purvis, of Mobile, Ala. 

6. John, killed in the Texan war. 

7. Dr. Paul H. , was lost at sea, 

8. Joseph, was murdered near Linden, Ala. 

9. Samuel, resides at Elyton, Ala., and is the father-in-law of 
Judge Mudd. 

10. Georgie, married Mr. Turpin, of Greenville, S. C. 

Among the Earles, Sloans and Taylors there are many eminent 
and distinguished physicians, lawyers, judges, members of the Legis- 
lature and of Congress. 

D 3. Major John Lewis, married Ann Berry Earle and had by 
her some eight or ten children, but raised only seven, viz. : 

E 1 . John Taliaferro, born in 1 787 ; married Eleanor Earle. 

E 2. Madison Earle, born in 1789 ; married Mary Griffin and 
Miss Painter. 

E 3. Thomasin, born in 1791; married Ezekiel Graham. 

E 4. Mildred McCoy, born in 1793; married Hon. Jas. Edwards. 

E 5. Jesse Payne, born in 1795; married Susan M. Taylor. 

E 6. Elizabeth, born in 1797. 

E 7. Baylis Washington, born 1806; married Frances Gaines. 

In 1836 Major John Lewis moved and settled near Adairsville, 
in Cass county, Ga., where he and his wife sank in peace to 
their final resting place. Their remains were interred at the Baptist 
church near Adairsville, where the following inscriptions can be 
found upon their tombstones: 



IN MEMORY OF 

MAJOR JOHN LEWIS, 

A soldier of the Revolution, 

Who departed this life 

November 4, A. D., 1840, 

Aged eightj'-three years one month 

and fourteen days. 

" How sleep the brave, who sink to rest 
With all their country's wishes blest." 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



219 



IN MEMORY OF 

ANN BERRY LEWIS, 

Who departed this life 

October 19, A. D. 1845, 

Aged seventy-eight years nine months 

and sixteen days. 



Than Major John Lewis, a more generous friend, a kinder lius- 
band, a more indulgent father, a better neighbor, a braver soldier, 
a purer patriot, or a more honest man never lived. He was a Rev- 
olutionary soldier and belonged to the Virginia line. He served 
under Captain John Marks, and was in the battles of Princeton, 
Brandjwine, Germantown, Monmouth, etc. 

E 1. John Taliaferro Lewis, son of Major John Lewis, was born 
in 1787. He was no ordinary man. At the age of twenty-one 
years he was appointed during life or good behaviour, Clerk of the 
Superior Court at Pendleton, S. C. , which office he held during life. 
He made an efficient officer, and discharged the duties thereof with 
honor to himself and to his country. His capacit}' for business was 
of the highest order, and was eminently qualified to fill any office 
within the gift of the people of Pendleton District. He was urbane, 
aflfable and generous toward his friends and all who had dealings 
with him. He made no pretentions to poesy, and never courted the 
muses; notwithstanding, the following impromptu efl'usion upon the 
' ' Rainbow ' ' was written by him in the album of a female friend, 
by request: 

THE RAINBOW. 

The Rainbow is beautiful and charming to sight, 

'Tis the hallowed sign from above. 
All radiant it glows evanescent with light, 

An emblem of peace like the dove. 

"'Tis set in the clouds," saith the Lord, 

"My cov'nant to witness with man," 
The promise it served to record 

That peace and good will had began. 

But see how it fades on the view, 

How soon it is lost to the sight; 
Oh! When will its beauties renew 

And resume all their colors so bright? 



220 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

When the dark lowering cloud shall appear, 
When the rain on the earth shall descend, 

Perhaps it again will be there, 
And in luminous majesty bend. 

It will foretell a calm in the skies. 

When no longer the thunders do roll, 
But when shall hope's rainbow arise 

And promise its calm to my soul? 

Oh, never again shall it rise 

O'er a mind overshadowed in gloom; 
Hope sickens, and sadness and woe 

Bear me down to mj^ rest in the tomb. 

And yet, a bright hope there is given, 

That when I'm laid under the sod, 
My soul shall mount up into heaven 

And live ever happy with God. 

There no longer the clouds shall depress, 

But the rainbow unceasingly cheer. 
Nor sorrow, nor strife, nor distress 
Shall ever encompass me there. 
Pendleton, S. C, 1829. John T. Lewis. 

In 1809 John Taliaferro Lewis married Eleanor Earle, his 
cousin, daughter of General John Baylis Earle, of Greenville 
county, South Carolina. He died at Pendleton, S. C, in 1832, and 
his wife in 1840. They raised eight children, viz. : 

F 1. John Baylis, born in 1811; married Elizabeth A. Miller. 

F 2. Sarah Ann, born in 1813; married Rev. John Golden. 

F 3. Rev. Joseph Berry, born in 1816; married Amelia Owen. 

F 4. Thomas Harrison, born in 1819; married Mrs. Blevins, nee 
Mary Horn. 

F 5. Rev. Henry Taliaferro, born in 1823; married C. A. Mur- 
ray and Mrs. Poole. 

F 6. Samuel Wilds, born in 1825; married Annie McCurry. 

F 7. Hannah Elizabeth, born in 1828, and 

F 8. Benjamin Franklin, born in 1830; married Sarah A. Bunch. 

F 1. John Baylis Lewis, was born in 1811. He acted as deputy 
clerk of the court under his father the last six years of his (father' s) 
life. At twenty-one years of age, he was appointed by Governor 
James Hamilton, of South Carolina, Justice of the Quorum. He 
taught school twenty-five years, after which he engaged in farming. 
He is a member of the Methodist church, and his post-office in 1860 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 221 

was Fairmount, Gordon county, Ga. In 1833 he married Elizabeth 
Ann Miller, daughter of Thomas Miller, by whom he had ten chil- 
dren, viz. : 

G 1. Elizabeth Ann Berry, born in 1834; married John. W. 
Robertson. 

G 2. Margaret Eleanor, born in 1836; married A. P. Camp. 

G 3. 1st John Taliaferro, born in 1836, and died 1839. 

G 4. Bay lis Washington Harrison, born in 1840.* 

G 5. William Henry Thomas, born in 1843. 

G 6. Wesley Whitfield Lindsay, born in 1846. 

G 7. Martha Artamesia Thomasin, born in 1849. 

G 8. 2d John Taliaferro, born in 1851. 

G 9. Samuel Franklin, born in 1853. 

GIO. Georgia Carolina, born in 1856. 

G 1. Elizabeth Ann Berry Lewis, married John W. Robertson, 
in 1850. He died in the Confederate Army. Their post-office was 
Resaca, Gordon county, Ga. They had four children, viz. : 

H 1. Mary Hannah Elizabeth, born in 1852. 

H 2. William Jasper, born in 1854. 

H 3. Matilda Eleanor, born in 1856. 

H 4. Laura Christina, born in 1859. 

G 2. Margaret Eleanor Lewis, married A. P. Camp, in 1855, and 
resides near Chaseville, Maury county, Ga. Mr. Camp died in the 
Confederate Armj^ Margaret Eleanor Lewis had two children, viz. : 

H 1. Elias Taliaferro, born in 1856. 

H 2. William Leonidas, born in 1858. 

F 2. Sarah Ann, daughter of John Taliaferro Lewis, was born in 
1813. She married, in South Carolina in 1835, Rev. John Golden, 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and resides near Pilot Grove, 
Grayson county, Tex. , and has issue, viz. : 

G 1. Hannah Harrison, born in 1836; married, in 1855, Caswell 
Orr, of South Carolina, a relative of J. L. Orr, the eloquent lawyer 
and distinguished member of Congress from South Carolina. 

G 2. Amanda Malvina, born 1838; married Berry McDade and 
resides in Grayson county, Texas. Mr. McDade is a very indus- 
trious mechanic. He was wounded in the Confederate war. They 
have children. 



* Baylis W. H. Lewis was in the Confederate Army. He carried a small 
Testament in his vest pocket. While before Richmond, a minnie ball 
struck the book, cut it nearly in two, glanced around his side, Avounding 
him slightly. The book saved his life. 



222 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY, 

G 3. Jane Adelaide, daughter of Sarah A. Grolden, born 1840; 
married William Peterson, of Macon, Miss. 

G 4. Sarah Cornelia, born 1842; married, in 1866, John Barnhill. 

G 5, John Taliaferro Lewis, born 1845. 

G- 6. Thomas William, born 1848. 

G 7. Samuel Asberry, born 1850. 

G 8. Sue Earle, born 1853. 

F 3. Rev. Joseph Berry Earle Lewis, son of John Taliaferro, 
was born in 1816 in Pendleton, S. C. He is a minister of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church and resides near Fairmount, Gordon county, 
Ga. In 1843 h6 married Amelia Owen and has children, viz. : 

G 1. Sarah Eleanor, born 1844. 

G 2. John Thomas, born 1847, etc. 

F 4. Thomas Harrison Lewis, son of John Taliaferro, was born 
in 1819. He was for many years a merchant of the house of Lewis 
& Porteus, of Mobile, Ala. He is a member of the Episcopal 
church. When he left Mobile he settled on a farm near Brown's 
Station, in Dallas county, Ala., where he remained several years, 
and finally he moved to Hinds county, Mississippi, in 1887, and set- 
tled near Utica, which is his post-office. He married Mrs. Blevins, nee 
Mary Horn, daughter of Dr. Josiah R. Horn, near AVarsaw, Sump- 
ter county, Ala. Dr. Horn was from Edgecomb county, North 
Carolina. His wife was a Miss DeBerry. 

Issue of Thomas H. Lewis, viz. : 

G 1. Fannie. 

G 2. Nellie Clewis, married William Mahan and resides near 
Utica, Hinds county. Miss. 

G 3. Crawford Philips, resided at luca, Tishamingo county. 
Miss., and died in 1890. 

G 4. Sophia Louisa, died single near Brown' s Station, in Dallas 
county, Ala., in September, 1884. 

F 5. Rev. Henry Taliaferro, son of John Taliaferro Lewis, was 
born in Pendleton, S. C, in 1823 and married Clarissa A. Murray. 
He read law in early life and was admitted to the bar, but having 
made a profession of religion about that time he turned his attention 
to the ministry. He emigrated to Mississippi about the year 1837 
or 1838 as an itinerant Methodist preacher and joined the Mississippi 
Conference. He is tall, lean, dignified and commanding in his 
appearance, and endowed with great conversational powers; hence, 
he is the soul of the social circle. He is one of the greatest philan- 
thropists of the age, and bows not at the shrine of Mammon, but is 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 223 

spending the prime of his life laboring for the good of his fellow- 
man. He refused a partnership with one of the ablest lawyers in 
Mississippi, preferring to be the expounder of the sublime truths of 
the Gospel to that of Blackstone. He is gifted with a talent of 
great versatility; to-day he appears as a teacher, to-morrow as a 
lecturer on Biology; next he appears at the bar as a lawyer, then a 
preacher, then a temperance lecturer, an editor, a traveling agent 
for a college, a railroad ; then a druggist, a merchant and a farmer. 
He is the author of the very unique and burlesque sermon entitled 
' ' The Harp of a Thousand Strings. ' ' His discourses and lectures 
were often interspersed with rich and amusing anecdotes. His 
apology for it was that by telling an anecdote he would command 
the attention of the audience, excite their risibility, get their mouths 
open and then cram something good down their throats. 

* [From a South Carolina paper.] 
To the Editor : In the Keowee Coicrier, of the 11th inst., I see an extract 
headed " The Author of the Harp of a Thousand Strings." The gentle- 
man's name is in print. As a friend of his, I will take the liberty of offer- 
ing one other string to his Harp. I hope it will not prove discordant. The 
Rev. Henry T. Lewis, of the Methodist Episcopal church, South, and a mem- 
ber of the Mississippi Conference, is of Welsh descent. His ancestors emi- 
grated from Wales and settled in Albemarle count}-, Virginia, long previous 
to the Revolutionary war. John Lewis, his grandfather, belonged to Gen- 
eral Lafayette's division of the army. Jesse P. Lewis, his uncle, had served 
his time in the army, and, a requisition being made for more troops on 
Virginia, he volunteered and took the place of a gentleman that was 
drafted, and they were both performers in the grand serenade of more than 
a thousand cannon that was given by General Washington, General Lafay- 
ette and others to Lord Cornwallis, his officers and soldiers at the battle of 
Yorktown, in Virginia. Blood will tell; the reverend gentleman's descent 
is from a musical family. I think he was born in the village of Pendleton, 
S. C. His father, John Taliaferro Lewis, was clerk of the district. His 
capacity for business was of the highest order. He married the daughter 
of John Baylis Earle, who was, for a long period of time, Adjutant-Gen- 
eral of the State and also a member of Congress from South Carolina. The 
reverend gentleman's friends and relatives, on his recent visit to Carolina, 
greeted him with great pleasure and parted with him in sorrow under his 
precarious state of health, hoping that he might yet see many days. 

Overton. 

During the twenty years he spent in Mississippi as a Methodist 
preacher and temperance lecturer he \isited every county in the 
State and organized the order of temperance known as the ' ' Social 
Circle." 



224 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

A few extracts from the proceedings of the Grand Circle of Mis- 
sissippi will show in what manner his indefatigable labors were 
appreciated by that order. 

Extract from the proceedings of the Grand Circle held at Lex- 
ington, Miss., in June, 1857, page 23. 

Brothers E. Rush Buckner and H. J. Harris introduced the following 
resolutions, which were adopted: 

Resolved, That this Grand Circle do hereby tender to our worthy brother, 
H. T. Lewis, G. C. G., the sincere thanks of our respective circles for his. 
past invaluable services and continued zealous support of the great cause 
of all mankind. 

Resolved, That in him we recognize the character of the good Samaritan 
fully illustrated and beautifully enforced and that around him our affec- 
tions shall ever cling with the fondest devotion, and our prayers and wishes, 
alike for his continued usefulness and health, shall remain unabated. 

The committee to whom was referred the address of the Grand Chief 
Guardian, submitted the following report, which was received: 

REPORT. 

To the Grand Circle of the State of Mississippi : 

Your committee have had under consideration the able and interesting 
report of our distinguished Grand Chief Guardian. Your committee deem 
it unnecessary and superiluous to enter into a detailed investigation of the 
several items contained in the report, or to add a single word of eulogy to 
the character of one whose eminence and brilliancy in the galaxy of 
humanity's defenders is unsurpassed by any since the organization of the 
original Washingtonians, down to the time of our present convention. We 
are, indeed, proud of our Grand Chief Guardian — we are proud of Henry 
T. Lewis — a name which has already made an influence upon the temper- 
ance, integrity and virtue of Mississippi's moral character that no opposi- 
tion from our common foe can ever counteract ; an influence which will 
continue to expand and increase till all mankind shall be compelled to 
acknowledge the efficiency of our order and be induced to join our ranks 
and co-operate with us in our glorious mission. 

[From a Memphis paper.] 
KEV. HENRY T. LEWIS. 

The many warm friends of this distinguished divine will be gratified to 
learn that he will fill an appointment in the Third-street Methodist church 
on Sabbath next. Mr. Lewis is a minister of the highest order of ability, 
whose originality of mind and manner, elegance of diction, sublimity of 
oratory and boldness of speech make his discourses interesting and remark- 
able. Well beloved and admired, as he is, by all who have listened to his 
eloquent appeals in behalf of the church and humanity, the bare mention 
of this notice will, we are assured, be sufficient to fill every seat in that 
capacious house of worship. Let all attend. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 225 

[From the Holly Springs (Miss.) Herald.] 
COMMENCEMENT SEKMON. 

Rev. Mr. Lewis, La Grange, Tenn., preached the commencement sermon 
of Franklin Female College to a large and attentive congregation at the 
Methodist church on Sunday morning last. We do not remember to have 
ever heard an abler or more beautiful discourse, or one to which we ever 
listened with more pleasure. His text was found in 2 Kings xvi. 13 : 
"Because in him there is found some good thing toward the Lord God of 
Israel." His description of the visit of the wife of Jeroboam to the Prophet 
Ahijah, in order to intercede for Abijah, her sick son, was a most beautiful 
and affecting passage. There were other passages of great beauty : The 
description of the appearance of the venerable Prophet of the Lord ; the 
grief of the loving mother, when Ahijah announced to her the death of her 
child, and the destruction of the house of Jeroboam ; the importance of 
moral culture at the family hearth-stone ; the influence of good deeds ; the 
exhortation to the congregation, particularly to the young ladies of Franklin 
College, to add religion to their many virtues for, without it, all else would 
be useless ; to act so that " some good thing toward the Lord God of Israel " 
should be found in them, were passages which were characterized by great 
beauty and eloquence. The sermon of Rev. Mr. Lewis will long be remem- 
bered by those who had the pleasure of hearing it. 

[For the Monitor.] 
FRIENDSHIPS TRIBUTE. 

BY HENRY T. LEWIS. 
Respectfully inscribed to Mrs. Lucy F. Pullium, 
In the future of life, should my sky be o'ercast 

By the clouds of misfortune and sorrow. 
With a heart full of hope I will turn to the past, 
Some ray from its sunshine to borrow. 

From the joys that are fled, from the hopes that are dead, 

Sweet thoughts will be flowing forever i 
Like the lessons of truth, that are gathered in youth, 

They will fade from my memory never. 

Each word of relief, that has lessened my grief, 

Each sentence in sympathy spoken. 
Shall in freshness remain, while a link in the chain 

That unites me to earth is unbroken. 

And whether my lot shall be happy or not 

In this world of misfortune and change; 
As if bound by a spell shall my heart ever dwell 

With the friends that I love in La Grange. 

And when the last ray that illumines life's day 

Shall be dim o'er the dark valley gleaming. 
Of the friends I love best, as I sink to my rest, 

Shall my spirit still sweetly be dreaming. 

The health of Clarissa Ann Murray, his wife, whom he married 
in Mississippi, was declining so rapidly that he was induced to leave 
15 



226 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Tennessee and seek a warmer and more congenial climate for her in 
Middleburg, Fla. , where she soon sank to rest. She died childless. 

OBITUARY. 

Died at Middleburg, East Florida, February 22, 1861, in her thirty-third 
year, Mrs. Clarissa Ann, wife of Rev. Henry T. Lewis. 
She sank to rest as a weary child, 
Not a sigh on her latest breath; 
And just as ever in life she smiled, 
She sweetly smiled in death. 

Bright flow'rs they bro't to deck her hair, 

They entwin'd her brow with a wreath; 
And she seem'd an angel sleeping there — 

The beautiful Bride of Death! 

She sleeps where orange branches wave, 

'Neath the bright Floridian sky, 
And blooming above her silent grave 

Are flowers that never die. 

She's free from a life of ceaseless pain, 

She will weep, she will sigh no more; 
By faith in the " Lamb for sinners slain," 

She was raised to the sun-bright shore. 
Middleburg, Fla., February, 186L H. T. L. 

After the death of his wife he located in Clinton, La., and 
embarked in the drug business, where he married, in 1861, the 
widow of his cousin, Joseph Poole, whose maiden name was Almina 
Cleveland, of Clinton, La. , by whom he raised five children, viz. : 

G 1. Annie, married, in 1884, Dr. Albert Roberts, of East 
Feliciana. 

Gr 2. Janie, married, in 1882, 0. E. Townsend, of East Feliciana. 

Gr 3. Wesley C, born 1864; married Ada Hearing in 1886, and 
died in Clinton, La., January 20, 1890. 

G 4. Henry B., born 1867; died 1874. 

G 5. John Taliaferro, born 1869. 

Rev. H. T. Lewis died away from home at Coushatta Point, on 
Red river, and was buried there in 1870. 

THE HARP OF A THOUSAND STRINGS. 

BY REV. HENRY T. LEWIS. 

The following rare and unique production in the way of sermon- 
izing chanced to come into our possession a short time ago, together 
with some of the attending circumstances which accompanied its 
delivery. The locale of this apostolic effort was the small village, 
Waterproof, on the Mississippi river, in the adjoining State of 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 227 

Louisiana. Our readers need not hastily infer from the name that 
Waterproof was a locality on the father of waters high and dry 
under all circumstances, for the general impression is that it was 
overflowed once at the time of Noahs deluge, and the oldest inhabi- 
tants having some distinct recollections of sundry times, even in the 
present century, ' ' when through the deep waters their pathway did 
lie." Though Waterproof may have been, from these circumstances, 
thought to be a part of the territory commonly called the low 
grounds of sorrow and iniquit}-, if not entirely Gospel proof, there is 
no question that it might be demonstrated rather a hard place, at 
least, morally speaking; and, if not specially named and embraced 
in the provisions of, the Northern Benevolent Society to furnish Gos- 
pel privileges to the South, as a part of the theater of its operations, 
it may truly and emphatically be said to be a part of the Lord's 
moral vineyard where the pruning knife of the Gospel had not 
lopped off the rank and luxuriant shoots of sin and wickedness. In 
proof of this we need no higher evidence of these facts than that 
there had not been a ' ' sermint ' ' preached in the place for half a 
dozen years. It is, therefore, not a matter of surprise that when a 
free missionary came along presenting spiritual privileges of all 
kinds so very cheap that he should have engaged the attention and 
sympathy of the natives. We must also give a brief view of the 
history of the preacher and his appearance, and for this, suffice it 
to say, that he came down the river on a flat-boat from the Wabash, 
in the interior of the Hoosier State, tied up at Waterproof, gave 
them to understand that he was a preacher, and they, not having 
had anything in that line for several years, thought it would be a 
favorable opportunity to take a benefit, and as Brother Zeke seemed 
to be rather on the verdant order they expected to have a little 
amusement mixed up with the exercises. The b" hoys rustled up a 
house for the services to be held in, and on Sunday morning Brother 
Zeke rigged himself up in his finest tackle, his Sunday best, and 
rolled up to the "place where prayer was (not) wont to be made." 
His dress consisted of a pair of Kentucky jeans pants, very much 
too short and fitting tight to the skin, a corduroy vest, red neck- 
cloth and a blue cloth coat, the style of which reaches back to a 
bygone period that knows no recent date. The collar was stifl3y 
braced with buckram and coarse flannel and mounted up very nearly 
to the top of his head, the skirts projecting below the calves of his 
legs, and set off, each from the other, like the prongs of a boot-jack. 
These were the leading features of the costume, the whole tout 



228 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

ensemble and personal of the flat-boat apostle presenting the extreme 
converse and opposite of our modern Shanghai gentleman. Eising 
in the pulpit, he delivered himself as follows: 

I may say to you, my breethring, that I am not aedecated man, an' I am 
not one of them as believes that edecation is necessary fur a Gospel min- 
ister, fur I bleeve the Lord edecates his preachers jest as he wants 'em to 
be edecated; an' though I say it, that oughn't to say it, yet in the State of 
Indianny, whar I live, thar's no man as gits a bigger congregation nor what 
I gits. Thar may be some here to-day, my breethring, as don't know what 
persuasion I am uv. Well, I may say to you, my breethring, that I'm a 
Hard-shell Baptist. Thar's some folks as don't like Hard-shell Baptists, 
but I'd rather have a hard shell as no shell at all. You see me here, to-day, 
my breethring, dressed up in these fine clothes; you mout think I am proud, 
my breethring, an' though I've been preaching uv the Gospel fur twenty 
years, an' although I'm capting uv a flat-boat that lies at your landing, I'm 
not proud, my breethring. I'm not a gwine to tell you adzackly whar my 
tex may be found; suffice it to say it's in the lids uv the Bible, and you'll 
find it some whar between the fust chapter uv the Book of Generations an' 
the last chapter uv the Book of Revolutions, an' ef you'll go an' sarch the 
Scriptures as I have sarched the Scriptures you'll not only find my tex thar, 
but a great many other texes as will do you good to read; an' my tex, when 
you shill find it, you shill find it tu read thus: " And he played on a harp 
uv a thousand strings — sperits uv just men made perfick." 

Now, my dear breethring, thar's a great many different kinds uv harps 
an' other musical instruments played upon in this sinful world. Some 
folks harp apon pollyticks, while others harp apon no subject at all; some 
folks plays on the cymbals, the Jews harp, the banjo, the pianny, the 
harpsichord, etc. Not boasting, but I plays a leetle on the fiddle myself; and 
then thar's David, he played on a harp before Saul, and the tex says: " He 
played on a harp uv a thousand strings— sperits uv just men made perfick." 

My tex, breethren, leads me to speak uv sperits. Now, thar's a great 
many kinds uv sperits in the world. In the fust place, thar's the sperits 
as some folks call ghosts, and then thar's the sperits uv turpentine, an' 
thar's the sperits as some folks calls liquor, an' I've got as good an artikel 
uv them kind uv sperits on my flat-boat as ever was fotch down the Mis- 
sissippi river, but thar's a great many other kinds uv sperits, for the tex 
says : " He played on a harp uv a t-h-o-u-sand strings— sperits uv just men 
made perfick." 

But I'll tell th'e kind uv sperits as is ment in the tex; it's fire. That's 
the kind uv sperits as is ment in the tex, my breethring. Now, thar's a 
great many kinds uv fire in the world. In the fust place, thar's the com- 
mon sort uv fire you light your pipe or segar with, an' then thar's fox fire, 
camp fire. Saint Anthony's fire, fire before you are ready, fire an' fall back 
an' many other kinds uv fire, for the tex says : " He played on a harp uv a 
thousand strings — sperits uv just men made perfick." 

But I'll tell you the kind of fire as is ment in the tex, my breethring — 
it's hell fire — an' that's the kind uv fire as a great many uv you'll come to. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 229 

€f you don't do better nor what you have been doin', for " He played on a 
harp uv a thousand strings — sperits uv just men made perflck." 

Now, the ditferent sorts uv fire in the world may be likened unto the 
different persuasions of Christians in the world. 

In the fust place, we have the Piscapalyuns, an' they're a high sailing, 
an' a high-falutin' set an' they may be likened to a turkey-buzzard what 
flies up into the ar, an' he goes up an' up till he looks no bigger nor j'our 
finger-nail, an' the fust thing you know he kums down, an' down, an' down, 
an' is a fillin himself on the carkiss uv a dead boss by the side uv the road, 
an' " He played on a harp uv a thousand strings — sperits uv just men made 
perfick." 

An' then thar's the Presberterans; they ar a high-minded kind uv folks. 
They bleeve in edecating their preachers, an' so they remind me uv a paper 
kite, fur the stronger the wind blows the higher the kite flies, until the 
string breaks or it loses its tail, an' then it dashes headlong down, down, 
ship-dash right into a brier patch; an' that is just the way uv the Presber- 
terans, my breethring, fur the more edecation they have the higher they 
fly, an' you know a kite has to have ballast to make it fly level; an', my 
dear breethring, that's jest the way uv the Presberterans. for their salary 
is their ballast, an' the more you give 'em the leveler are tbeir heads an' 
the higher they fly, an" ef j-ou lighten their ballast they kick up a dust an' 
skedaddle away like a wild boss running away in harness until they flnd 
some place whar thar's plentj' uv ballast, fur the tex says : "He played on 
a harp uv a thousand strings — sperits uv just men made perfick." 

An' then thar's the Metherdis, an' they may be likened unto the squirrel 
running up into a tree, fur the Metherdis bleeves in gwine on from one 
degree of grace to another, an' finally on to perfeckshun, an' the squirrel 
goes up, an' up, an" up, an' he jumps from limb to limb, an' from branch 
to branch, an' the fust thing you know he falls, an' down he comes ker- 
flumux, an' that's like the Metherdis, fur they is allers fallin' from grace 
ah, an' " He played on a harp uv a thousand strings — sperits uv just men 
made perfick." 

An' then, my breethring, thar's the Baptist — ah; an' they have been 
likened unto a 'possum on a "simmon tree; an" the thunders maj^ roll and 
tlie yarth may quake, but that 'possum clings thar still — ah; an' you may 
shake one foot'loose an' the other's thar; an' you maj' shake all feet loose, 
an" he laps his tail 'round the limb an' he clings, an' heelings furever, fur 
" He played on a harp uv a thousand strings — sperits of just men made 
perfick." 

F 6. Samuel Wilds, son of John Taliaferro Lewis, was born in 
1825. He was a printer by trade, and died in Pendleton, S. C, in 
1857. He married Ann McCurry, of Abbeville county, South Caro- 
lina, by whom he had two children, viz. : Gr 1, George Seaborn, and 
O 2, William. 

F 7. Hannah Elizabeth, daughter of John Taliaferro Lewis, was 
born in 1828. She was known among the family relatives as " Miss 



230 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Tiny Lewis. ' ' She was a member of the Episcopal church, and was a 
very amiable woman. She spent her time among her relatives in 
South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. She 
died single in Rome, Ga., in 1886. 

F 8. Benjamin Franklin, son of John T. Lewis, was born in 
1830. In 1860 he married Sarah Ann Bunch. He and his wife are 
both members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Their post- 
office, in 1860, was Fairmount, Gordon county, Ga. They have chil- 
dren, viz. : G 1 , Thomas, etc. 

E 2, Madison Earle, son of Major John Lewis and his wife, Ann 
Berry Earle, was born in Rutherford county. North Carolina, in 
1789. He was a blacksmith by trade, and after coming of age, 
he located in Pendleton, S. C, where he married Mary Griffin, 
daughter of Major John Griffin, of Pendleton, by whom he had ten 
children. He emigrated to Alabama and settled in Marengo county, 
near "Nanafalia," where his wife died. Some years afterward he 
moved to Clark county, Alabama, and there married again, in 1859, 
Miss Nancy Painter, a lady eighteen years of age, who survived 
their marriage onl}' a short time, and died childless. In 1861 he 
died at the house of a Mr. Kilpatrick, at Wood's Bluflf, on the east 
bank of the Tombigby river, in Clark county, Alabama, of pneu- 
monia. He was modest and unassuming in his manners, and was 
beloved and respected by all who knew him. He was the ' ' noblest 
work of God" — an " honest man." 

The following are the names of his children: 

F 1. James, born about 1810 or 1811, in Pendleton, S. C. ; died 
single, in 1870, at the residence of his sister, Mrs. Nancy Nail, in 
Carroll county, Mississippi. 

F 2. Sarah W., born about 1816; married Victor Modawell. He 
died in Marengo county, Alabama, in 1856. She, in 1891, is resid- 
ing, a widow, with her daughter, Jennie Dowdy, near Stephen's 
Creek P. 0., White count}^ Ark. 

Mrs. Modawell left three children, viz. : 

G 1. Nancy Jane, born 1844 in Marengo county, Alabama. She 
married, in Tate county, Mississippi, Henry F. Dowdy in 1868, and 
now resides near Stephen's Creek P. O., White county, Ark. 
She had six children, viz. : 

H 1. Estelle, born 1869, and died in White county, Arkansas, 
in 1870. 

H 2. Frank, born 1871 in White county, Arkansas. 

H 3. Hattie, born 1873 in White county, Arkansas, and died 1875. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 231 

H 4. Thomas Earle, born 1876 in Tate county, Mississippi, and 
died 1877. 

H 5. Lucille, born 1878 in Tate county, Mississippi. 

H 6. Mary Olenza, born 1881 in Tate county. 

G 2. Madison Modawell, born 1846 in Clarke county, Alabama, 
and married Ella Trulford and died in Marengo county, Alabama, in 
1869. He was a soldier in the Confederate Army. 

Gr 3. Fannie Modawell, born 1855 in Marengo county, Alabama, 
and married Eli Derlin in White county, Arkansas, in 1871, and 
died at Coldwater, Tate county. Miss., in 1878. She left one son, 
viz. : 

H 1. Sydna, born 1875. 

F 3. John Griffin, son of Madison E. Lewis; was born in Pendle- 
ton, S. C, in 1817. He emigrated to Marengo county, Alabama, 
with his father, where he married, in 1838, Margaret McEntire. In 
1845 he emigrated to Newton county, Mississippi, and from there to 
Louisiana, where his wife died in 1855. After the death of his wife 
he moved to and settled in Kaufman count}-, Texas. In 1861 he 
joined the Confederate Army as a private in Ross' 6th Texas Brigade, 
and died in 1864 at Little Rock, Ark., of diseases contracted in the 
army. He was a farmer. 

F 3. John G., had nine children born to him, viz. : 

G 1. Mary Elizabeth, born 1840; died in early life. 

G 2. John M., born 1842 in Marengo county, Alabama. He 
emigrated with his father to Newton county, Mississippi, to Louisiana 
and finally to Kaufman county, Texas. In 1861 he entered the 
Confederate Army as a private in Ross' 6th Texas Brigade, and 
remained in the army until the surrender. He was captured in 
West Tennessee in 1863 and was held as a prisoner at Fortress Mon- 
roe until exchanged. He was twice wounded and twice a prisoner — 
once at Camp Douglas and once in North Alabama. After Hood's 
retreat from Nashville he was seriously wounded and was left on 
the battle-field by his company, about two hours, as they thought he 
would die. 

He married, in Texas, about 1867, Miss Leona A. Dunnica, by 
whom he has eight children, viz. : 

H 1. Edward C, born 1868. 

H 2. Emma, born 1870. 

H 3. Jennie, born 1872. 

H 4. Frank, born 1873. 

H5. Kate M., born 1875. 



232 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

H 6, Jesse May, born 1877. 

H 7. John A., born 1878, and 

H 8. Fred. M., born 1888. They reside near Forney, Tex. 

G 3. Sarah Jane, daughter of John Griffin Lewis, died young. 

G 4. Susan R. , daughter of J. G. Lewis, was born in 1845. She 
married G. W. Dougherty in Texas. They both died in Kaufman 
county, Texas, in 1883, leaving six children, viz. : 

H 1. Wm. T. born 1866; married Sallie E. Guinis in 1890. 

H 2. Zilpha Ellen, born 1869; married Jas. M. Akin and has 
two children. 

H3. Jack H., born 1872. 

H 4. Alice Bell, born 1875. 

H 5. Brown B., born 1877. 

H 6. Leona A., born 1880. 

G 5. Bay lis Washington, son of J. G. Lewis, born 1 846 ; died young. 

G 6. Pinkney G., born 1848; married Susan Williams, resides in 
Forney, Tex., and runs a livery stable, and, had six children living 
in 1889, viz. : 

H 1. Oscar Adolphus. 

H 2. Travis, born 1875; died 1889. 

H 3. Hattie, born 1878. 

H4. Severe C, born 1880. 

H 5. Anna, born 1883. 

H 6. Owens Burnes, born 1889. 

G 7. Esther, daughter of J. G. Lewis, born 1849, and died young. 

G 8. Christopher C, son of J. G. Lewis, born 1851; married 
Lucy Breeding and has seven children, viz. : 

H 1. Pinkney G., born 1869; died young. 

H 2. Robert Benton, born 1871. 

H 3. Julia Bell, born 1874. 

H4. Wm. H., born 1877. 

H 5. C. C, born 1880; died young. 

H6. Stella H., born 1883. 

H 7. E. Ross, born 1886. 

All in Kaufman county, Texas. 

G 9. Wm. Edward, son of J. G. Lewis, born 1853; died young. 

F 4. Taliaferro, son of Madison E. Lewis, married and died, 
leaving three children, viz. : 

G 1. Sallie, married B. F. Alldread and resides near Grenada, 
Miss. They have children, viz. ; 

H 1. John Taliaferro, died in childhood in 1868. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 233 

H 2. James, died in 1871. 

H 3. Robt. Lee, born 1870. 

H 4. Ella, born 1872. 

H 5. Seal Silas, born 1875. 

H G. Sarah E., born 1877. 

H7. Thomas T., born 1880. 

G 2. Jennie, daughter of Toliver Lewis, married Wm. Riley and 
resides near Grenada, Miss. 

F 5. Jo. Berry Earle, son of Taliaferro Lewis, died in childhood. 

F 6. Richard Overton, died single in Clarke county, Alabama. 

F 7. Nancy, born 1831 ; married Abraham S. Nail and died in 
Carroll county, Mississippi, in 1881. He died in 1886. They left 
two children. 

F 8. Washington, died single in Clarke county, Alabama. 

F 9. Baylis, died single in Madison county, Alabama. 

F 10. Esther, married Jas. Beatty, had four children and died in 
1856 near Linden, Marengo county, Ala. 

F 11. Mary, died single. 

E 3. Mildred, daughter of Major John Lewis, was born in 
Rutherford county. North Carolina, and was, perhaps, his fourth 
child instead of the third, and was born about 1793. She 
married Hon. James Edwards, Representative and Senator of St. 
Clair county, Alabama in the State Legislature. She was a meek 
and humble Christian, and died childless, in St. Clair county in 
1843. 

E 4. Thomasin F. , daughter of Major John Lewis, was born in 
Rutherford county. North Carolina, in 1791. In 1811 she married 
Ezekiel Graham, son of William Graham, the signer of the Meck- 
lenburg Declaration of Independence, of North Carolina. 

William, the signer of the Mecklenburg Declaration, was a 
brother of General George and General Joseph Graham, of Revo- 
lutionary fame, and whose sister married General Griffith Ruther- 
ford, whose name is so intimately associated with the early history 
of North Carolina and Tennessee. 

James and Richard Graham, two brothers, originally emigrated 
from Argyleshire, in Scotland and came to Ireland, and fought there 
undsr William, Prince of Orange, in the celebrated battle of Boyne, 
in 1690, which permanently established the House of Orange upon 
the English throne, after which the brothers came to America and 
settled in Pennsylvania. In 1766 Mrs. Graham, a widow of one of 
the sons of James or Richard, moved and settled in the vicinity of 



234 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



Charlotte, N. C. She was the mother of William, the signer of the 
Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence, of General George, of 
General Joseph Graham, and of a sister who married General 
GriflSth Rutherford, of Revolutionary memory. 

[From Wheeler's History of North Carolina, page 265.] 
General George Graham was a resident of Mecklenburg. He was a 
brother of General Joseph Graham, and performed a "soldier's service" in 
the Revolution. There was no duty too perilous, no service too dangerous 
that he was not ready to undertake for his country. He was born in Penn- 
sylvania in 1758, and came, with his widowed mother and four others, to 
North Carolina when about six years old. He was educated at Charlotte, 
and was distinguished for his assiduity and noble temper. He was early 
devoted to the cause of his country. In 1775 he, with a few others, rode 
all night to Salisbury, seized the Torj' lawyers, Dunn and Boothe, brought 
them to Mecklenburg, and from thence they were carried to Camden and 
imprisoned. 

When Cornwallis lay at Charlotte (October, 1780), he was active in 
attacking his foraging parties, and annoying them so as to render their 
supplies hazardous and difficult. He was the leader of the attack at 
Mclntire's, seven miles from Charlotte on the Seattle's Ford road, and 
actuall}', with twelve men, compelled the foraging party of four hundred 
English to retreat, they fearing, from the fatality of the fire, that an 
ambuscade was prepared for them. He was Major-Qeneral of militia of 
North Carolina ; for a long time Clerk of the court of Mecklenburg 
county, and often a member of the Legislature. He died on the 29th of 
March, 1826. The following inscription is from the slab of marble that 
covers his grave at Charlotte: 



SACRED TO THE MEMORY 
— OF — 

MAJOR-GENERAL GEORGE GRAHAM, 

Who died 

On the 29th of March, 1826, 

In the sixty-eighth year of bis age. 

He lived more than half a century in the vicinity 
of this place, and was a zealous and active defender of 
his coufltry's rights in the Revolutionary war, and one 
of the gallant twelve who drove it back, and actually 
drove four hundred British troops at Mclntire's, seven 
miles north of Charlotte, on the 3d of October, 1780. 
George Graham filled many high and responsible public 
trusts, the duties of which he discharged with fidelity-. 
He was the people's friend, not their flatterer, and uni- 
formly enjoyed the unlimited confidence and respect of 
his fellow-citizens. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 235 

Hon. James Graham and ex-Governor William A. Graham were 
sons of General Joseph Graham. For particulars of the Graham 
family the reader is referred to Wheeler's History of North 
Carolina. 

E 4. Thomasin Farrar, daughter of Major John Lewis ( as before 
mentioned), married Ezekiel Graham. They finally moved to Cass 
countj^ Georgia, and settled near Adairsville, where she died in 1863. 
They had ten children, marked F. , viz. : 

F 1. John Lewis Graham, born in 1812; died single, in Louisiana, 
in 1851. 

F2 William Madison Graham, born in 1814; married Ann 
Whitehead in 1852; lives near Adairsville, Ga. ; is a farmer, and has 
children, viz. : G 1, Lewis Earle, born in 1855, etc. 

F 3. Ann Berry Graham, born in 1816; married John Adair, 
and lives in Murray county, Georgia, They have children as fol- 
lows: G 1, Mildred Thomasin Adair; G 2, Virgil Bullantine Adair; 
G 3, Edward Alexander Adair; G 4, Margaret Matthew, and G 5, 
Narcissa Ann Berry Adair. 

F 4. Joseph Alexander Graham, born in 1818; married Martha 
Ann McKin; resides in Cass county, Georgia, and has the following- 
named children: G 1, Mary Octavia; G 2, Margaret Florence; G 3, 
Sarah Ann Thomasin; G 4, William Alexander, and G 5, John 
Lewis. 

F 5. Margaret Clarkson, daughter of Ezekiel Graham, born in 
1820; married Augustus McDaniel; resides in Murray county, 
Georgia, and has children, viz. : G 1, Thomasin Elizabeth, etc. 

F 6, Mildred, born in 1823; died 1824. 

F 7. Martha Gibson, born in 1826; married Edward R. Roberts, 
had one child, viz. : G 1, Martha Ann Augusta, and died in 1848. 

Edward W. Roberts was on board the steamer ' ' A. Douglas ' ' 
about 1852, bound for Mobile, when she was blown up. He died two 
days afterward in Mobile, Ala., of injuries received from the 
explosion. 

F 8. Samuel Parkhill, son of Ezekiel Graham, born 1829; died 
1831. 

F 9. Richard Addison, born 1831; resides in Rankin county, 
Mississippi. 

F 10. Benjamin Calhoun, born 1833; died 1835. 

E 5. Jesse Payne, son of Major John Lewis, was born in 1795; 
was a lawyer by profession; resided at Pendleton Village, South 
Carolina. He married Susan M. Taylor, daughter of Colonel Joe 



236 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Taylor, a son of Major Sam. Taylor, of the Revolutionary Army. 
Colonel Joe Taylor and his wife, Nancy Sloan, daughter of David 
Sloan, had the following children: 

1. David S., of Pendleton, S. C, married Sally, daughter of 
Zack Taliaferro. 

2. Ellen C, married Mr. Poe, of Pendleton, S. C. 

3. Dr. William S., of Mobile, Ala., married a daughter of H. B. 
Holcombe. 

4. Dr. Joseph, of Harrison county, Texas, married a Miss Knee- 
land, of Augusta, Ga. 

5. John Bay lis Earle, of Harrison county, Texas, married a Miss 
Hubbard, of South Carolina. 

6. Samuel J., of Harrison county, Texas, married Miss Lester, 
and 

7. Susan M., married Jesse P. Lewis, of Pendleton, S. C. 
Jesse P. Lewis married Susan M. Taylor, daughter of Colonel 

Joe Taylor and his wife, Nancy Sloan, daughter of David Sloan and 
his wife, Susan Majors, of Maryland. 

Jesse P. Lewis died at Pendleton, S. C, in the fall of 1845. 
The following obituary notice appeared in a Pendleton paper shortly 
after his death: 

Died on the morning of the 12th instant at his residence near this 
place, Jesse P. Lewis, Esq., in the fift^'-flrst year of his age. 

Mr. Lewis was a native of North Carolina, but for the last thirty years 
or more, had made Pendleton his home. He was an affectionate husband, 
a kind, indulgent parent, a sincere friend, and in business an honest, system- 
atic man. For the last four years of his life he was a member of the 
Presbyterian church, and in his dying moments seemed to feel a hope of 
happiness beyond the grave. The wife and six children left behind feel 
that the loss they have sustained is great, but they humbly bow them- 
selves in submission to the Divine will, feeling that their loss is his eternal 
gain. 

Jesse P. Lewis and his wife, Susan M. , had eight children, but 
raised only six, viz. : 

F 1. Susan, died in childhood. 

P 2. Jesse P., died in infancy. 

F 3. Nancy Taylor, born in 1825; died in 1848. She was highly 
accomplished, a lucid writer, and a very amiable woman. She was 
too pure and holy for this earth, and is now in the full fruition of 
that beautiful joy which none but the righteous shall know. She 
was beloved and almost adored by relatives and friends, which 
should teach us ' ' how frail is human nature. ' ' 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 237 

F 4. Robert Onslow, born in 1832; belonged to Captain Humph- 
rie's company of the Confederate Army; was taken prisoner at the 
first Manassas battle; was exchanged, and afterward died in the 
army. He was noble, generous, brave and patriotic. For his 
country he lived, and for his country he died. 

F 5. John Joseph, was born at Pendleton Village, S. C, in 1837, 
where he was for some years engaged as a merchant. In 1859 he 
married Carrie C, daughter of Rev. Jeremiah Dickinson, of Charles- 
ton, S. C. , by whom he had two daughters. 

Daring the Confederate war J. J. Lewis was in a company of 
mounted rifles — afterward called " Trenholme's Squadron," and 
finally merged into the 7th Regiment of South Carolina Cavalry. 
He was elected Clerk of the court of Pickens county. South Caro- 
lina, in 1876, 1880 and 1884. His post-office is Pickens, S. C. 
After the death of his first wife, he married Maggie G. Wilkinson, 
of Pendleton, S. C, by whom he has, in 1887, three children, mak- 
ing five in all, viz. : 

Gr 1. Nina Dickinson, married Wm. S. Hunter, in 1887. 

G 2. Sue Ellen; G 3, Robert Earle; G 4, Jennie Hall; G 5, John 
Joseph. 

F 6. Ellen Maria, daughter of Jesse P. Lewis, married B. Frank 
Sloan, of Walhalla, S. C. 

F 7. Jesse Albemare, born in 1842; died 1856. 

F 8. Earle Sloan, born in 1843; was in the Confederate war, and 
was killed near Fredericksburg, Va., while trying to arrest a 
deserter. 

E 6. Elizabeth, daughter of Major John Lewis, was burned to 
death by her clothes taking fire. 

E 7. Baylis Washington, son of Major John Lewis, was born in 
1806. He was named after two of his maternal uncles — Baylis and 

Washington Earle. Washington Earle' s children, were: Mrs. 

Robinson, of Pendleton, S. C. ; Mrs. Wm. L. Yancy, of Montgomery, 
Ala. ; Mrs. Holcombe ; Mrs. Whitten, of South Carolina, and Mrs. 
Eliphlet Smith. 

The names of Baylis Earle' s children can be found on another 
page. 

Baylis W. Lewis is a genuine specimen of a plain, hospitable 
farmer. He is warm-hearted and fond of his friends and kinsfolk. He 
married Frances Gaines in 1841, and lives near Adairsville, Bartow 
county, Ga. Frances Gaines is a relative of General Edmund Pen- 
dleton Gaines. The tradition in the Gaines family is that there 



238 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

were seven brothers, who originally emigrated from Wales to Vir- 
ginia. From these seven brothers descended all the Gaineses of 
America. The grandfather of General Ed. P. Gaines married a 
sister of Ed. Pendleton ; hence the Pendleton branch of said family. 
For a biography of General Gaines, the reader is referred to ' ' Blake' s 
Biographical Dictionary. ' ' 

E 7. Baylis W. Lewis and Frances Gaines were married in what 
is now Bartow county, Georgia, in 1841. He died on the 14th of 
August, 1890. They had seven children, viz. : 

F 1. Washington Earle, born in 1842, and died 1846. 

F 2. John Prince. 

F 3. Jesse Caleb. 

F 4. Frances Amaryllis, born in 1851, and died 1853. 

F 5. Margaret Ann; F 6, Baylis Earle; F 7, Fannie Mildred. 

F 2. John Prince, married Miss Ada C. Gait, of Canton, Ga., 
and has children, viz.: G 1, Prince; G 2, Fannie; G 3, Mildred; 
G 4, Amaryllis, etc. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



239 



CHAPTER XL 



ROWLAND FAMILY. 

D 4. Mildred McCoy, daughter of John Lewis and his wife, Sarah 
Taliaferro, of Virginia, was born in Amelia county, Virginia, in 1759. 

Thomas Rowland was born in Hanover county, Virginia, in 1750. 

The Lewises and the Rowlands both emigrated from Wales at the 
same time, and settled in Hanover county, Virginia. 

Mildred McCoy Lewis married Thomas Rowland in 1777, in 
Rutherford county. North Carolina, where they resided for many 
years, but finally moved to Greenville county, South Carolina, and 
settled on the south fork of Saluda river, some six or seven miles 
below the celebrated "Table Rock," where they both died. Their 
remains were interred at their homestead. The following are 
copies of their epitaphs to be found on their tombstones: 



SACRED TO THE MEMORY 
— OF — 

THOMAS ROWLAND, 

Who was born in the County of Hanover, 

Virginia, September the 8th, 1750, 

And departed this life 

April 3d, 1836, 

Aged eighty-five years six months 

and twenty-six days. 



SACRED TO THE MEMORY 
— OF — 

MILDRED ROWLAND, 

Who was born in the county of Amelia, 

Virginia, September 26, 1759, 

And departed this life 

April 39, 1847, 

Aged eighty-seven years seven months 

and three davs. 



240 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Thomas Rowland was a soldier of the American Revolution, and 
on one occasion, while in the service of his country, he was taken 
prisoner by the Tories who held a caucus to decide whether or 
not they should hang him. They asked him if he had anything to 
say in vindication of his character and conduct as a rebel. He 
referred them to Major William Green, of Rutherford county, North 
Carolina, with whom he was personally acquainted, and who was at 
that time a Tory captain in the service of King George. Major 
Green laconically replied that ' ' he was a very troublesome little 
fellow. ' ' However, by some adroit maneuver he evaded the halter 
and lived for many years to enjoy the liberties of his country. 

After his death the following respect was paid to his memory by 
the editor of a paper published at Greenville C. H., S. C. : 

OBITUARY. 

Departed this life on the 3d instant about 1 o'clock in the evening, Mr. 
Thomas Rowland, of Greenville District, S. C, in the eighty-eighth year 
of his age. He served his country faithfully and effectually during the 
Revolutionary war, and having, as he often said, attained and lived to enjoy 
the principles for which he battled, refused, though eminently entitled to, 
his country's bounty, alleging that he fought for liberty and not for money ; 
and that as it had pleased God to bless his industry, since peace had covered 
the land so as to afford him a reasonable competency, he asked nothing 
more of his country than the quiet enjoyment of it in his old age, and the 
free institutions for which in youth he had struggled. 

He was a kind and affectionate husband and father, a liberal and 
friendly neighbor, an indulgent master and an honest man. He has left an 
aged wife and numerous descendants and friends to mourn his loss. 

Greenville, S. C, April 9, 1836. 

Thomas and Mildred McC. Rowland raised eleven children, viz. : 
E 1. Sarah Taliaferro, born in 1778, and died single. 
E 2. Mrs. Miriam Powell, born in 1780. 
E 3. Mrs. Elizabeth Wilcox, born in 1782. 
E 4. Mrs. Nancy Sadler, born in 1785. 
E 5. Thomas Lewis, born in 1787. 
E 6. Mrs. Frances Goode, born in 1790. 
E 7. John Sharp, born in 1795. 
E 8. William Thilman, born in 1797. 
E 9. James Charles, born in 1800. 
E 10. Mrs. Melinda Jane Thomas, born in 1800. 
E 11. Richard Demarquis, born in 1802. 

E 1. Sarah Taliaferro, daughter of Thomas and Mildred McC. 
Rowland, was deaf and dumb; never married. She died at the 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 241 

residence of her sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Wilcox, in Clarksville, Tenn. , 
in 1852, of cholera. 

E 2. Miriam, daughter of Thos. Rowland, married Ransom 
Powell in Rutherford county. North Carolina. After the death of 
Mr. Powell she emigrated to Habersham county, Georgia, where 

she married a Mr. Queen. She had twelve children by her first 

husband and none by the second. She died near Clarkesville, in said 
county, in 1845. 

The following are the names of her children, in part: 

F 1. Richard Lewis Powell. 

F 2. Augustus Powell. 

F 3. John M. Powell, was born in 1813 in Rutherford county, 
North Carolina. He married a Miss Penrice on Lake Wash- 
ington, in Washington county, Miss., in 1842. He was residing 
in Coahoma county, Mississippi, in 1866 and had these children, viz. : 

G 1. Augustus, died while in the Confederate Army. 

G 2. Ida, born 1847. 

G 3. Richard Lewis, born 1849. 

G4. John M., born 1854. 

E 3. Elizabeth Rowland, daughter of Thomas, was born in 
Rutherford county, North Carolina, in 1782. John Earle Wilcox, 
son of Samuel, was born in Virginia in 1765. Samuel Wilcox was 
a native of Virginia, from which State he emigrated to Rutherford 
county. North Carolina, and from North Carolina he moved to 
Woodford county, Kentucky, in 1781. In 1784 he removed from 
Kentucky and landed at a place on Cumberland river where Nash- 
ville now stands, but was then a wilderness. At the time of his 
arrival in Tennessee the early settlers were very much annoyed by 
hostile tribes of Indians that were continually committing depreda- 
tions upon them. John E. Wilcox, then a youth of nineteen, fired 
with the spirit of resentment, took a very active part against the 
Indians. He spent about twelve years, during the prime of his life, 
in Indian warfare. He acted part of the time as a spy, and was in 
a great many hotly-contested, hand-to-hand conflicts with them. 
The hostility of the Indians in this section of the country never 
ceased until after the battle of Nickajack, where they were so signally 
defeated in 1794. 

Elizabeth Rowland and John E. Wilcox were married in Ruther- 
ford county. North Carolina, in 1801, and afterward settled at or 
near Clarksville, in Montgomery county, Tenn., where he died 

about 1830. She was alive in 1884. 
16 



242 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY, 

They had nine children, viz. : 

F 1. Churchwell, born 1802; died from a gram of corn in his 
throat, in 1806. 

F 2. Dr. Chesterfield Lewis, born 1805; married Amanda M. 
Jones. 

F 3. Ethelbert Samuel, born 1808; married Dorothy E. Marshall. 

F 4. Dr. Ethelred Thomas, born 1811; married Rachel McF. 
Hunter and Ann E. Merritt. 

F 5. Mortimer Delville, born 1813; killed by a horse in 1825, 

F 6. General Albert Gallatin, born 1816; married Mary K. 
McGavock. 

F 7, Mildred Geraldine, born 1819; married Wm. L. Hiter. 

F 8. Middleton Ewing, born 1822. 

F 9. Hannah Eglantine, born 1824; married Needham B. Whit- 
field. 

F 2. Dr. Chesterfield L. Wilcox, born 1805; is a member of the 
Presbyterian church, graduated at the Transylvania University and 
commenced the practice of medicine in Russellville, Logan county, 
Ky. , in 1827, where his success as a practitioner was without 
•a precedent. He there married Amanda Mahala Jones, daughter of 
Dr. Walter Jones, in 1829, by vt^hom he has had eleven living chil- 
dren. He died at Clarksville, Tenn. , July 22, 1880, aged seventy- 
five years. 

The following are the names of his children: 

G 1. Elizabeth Harwood, born 1830, and died 1831. 

G 2. John Edward, born 1831; married Mary Faxon in 1855, by 
whom he has two children, viz. : H 1, Nora Newel, born 1856, and 
died in 1857, and H 2, George Edward, born 1857. G 2, Jno. 
Edward, lives at Clarksville, Tenn. 

G 3. Walter Jones, born 1835, and died 1835. 

G 4, Sarah Elizabeth, born 1837; is a graduate of Clarksville, 
Tenn,, Female Academy. 

G 5. Chesterfield Byrne, born 1838; is a merchant at Grays- 
ville, Ky, 

G 6. Mary Irene, born 1841; G 7, Walter Breathitt, born 1844; 
G 8, James Polk, born 1845; G 9, Albert Gallatin, born 1847; G 10, 
Emma Amanda, born 1849; G 11, Clarence Oliver, born 1852. 

F 3. Ethelbert Samuel Wilcox, was born in 1808; was a deacon 
in the Baptist church, and a farmer by occupation in Montgomery 
county, Tennessee. In 1830 he married Dorothy Elizabeth Marshall, 
by whom he had nine children, and died in 1859. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 243 

The following are the names of his children : 

G 1. Elizabeth Ann, born 1831, and died in 1831. 

G 2. Virginia Geraldine, born 1832; married Simon Bright Her- 
ring in 1853, a farmer near Clarksville, Tenn., by whom she has two 
children, viz.: H 1, Edward Herington, born 1855, died 1856; and 
H 2, Rachel Elizabeth, born 1857. 

G 3. Margaret Sophia, born 1834; G 4, John Carter, born 1837; 
G 5, Amanda Melvina, born 1839; G 6, Samuel Ethelbert, born 1842; 
G 7, James Ewing, born 1845; G 8, Edward Dearing, born 1848, 
died in 1851, and G 9, Sarah Ella, born 1852. 

F 4. Dr. Ethelred Thomas, son of John E. Wilcox, was born in 
1811; is a member of the Methodist church; was a student at the 
Transylvania University; commenced the practice of medicine in 
1836. In 1836 he married Rachel McFarlen Hunter, of Russellville, 
Ky., who was born in 1814. In 1838 he moved to Missouri, where 
his wife died in 1841; he had four children, only one of whom was 
born alive, to- wit: G 1, John Degrafton, born 1841, and died in 1841. 

In 1843 he married his second wife Ann Eliza Merritt, daughter 
of Dr. Daniel Merritt, of Todd county, Kentucky. She (Ann 
Eliza) was born in 1827. He has had the following-named chil- 
dren by his second wife: G 1, Mildred Madora, born 1844; G 2, 
Lucy Ann, born 1845; G 3, Cordelia Eglantine, born 1847; G 4, 
Olivia Ewing, born 1849, and died 1851, and G 5, Thomas Daniel, 
born 1855. After doing a very heavy and laborious practice for 
fifteen years and losing his health therebj'. Dr. E. T. Wilcox moved 
back to Montgomery county, Tennessee, abandoned the practice of 
his profession and is now (1859) living on a farm enjoying "rural 
felicit}', ' ' the comforts of which he was in a great degree deprived 
during the time he was actively engaged in the practice of his 
profession. 

F 6. General Albert Gallatin Wilcox, son of John E., was born in 
1816 ; was a student of the law department of Transylvania University ; 
commenced practice in 1841 at Clarksville, Tenn., where he remained 
until 1849, when he married Mar}' Kent McGavock, of Nashville, 
Tenn., after which he remained one year in Clarksville to enable 
him to settle up his unfinished business when he abandoned his 
profession and settled on a farm near Nashville, upon which he 
lived five years and then removed to Montgomery county, near 
Oraysville, Ky. He was made a Brigadier-General in 1847. 

The following are the names of his children : 

G 1. Joseph Ewing, born 1850; G 2, Mary Alberta, born 1851; 



244 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

G 3, John Earle, born 1854, and G 4, James McGavock, bom 
1856. 

F 7. Mildred Geraldine Wilcox, daughter of John E., was born 
in 1819; married William Leonard Hiter in 1838, and died 1857. 
She had by him seven children, viz. : 

G 1. Elizabeth Harriet, born in 1839, and married Andrew 
Hynes Ewing, son of Hon. Andrew Ewing, of Nashville, Tenn., in 
1858. 

G 2. Chesterfield James, born in 1841. 

G 3. Mildred Eglantine, born in 1844. 

G 4. Legrand DeForest, born in 1846. 

G 5. William Leonard, born in 1848. 

G 6. Helen Mary, born in 1849, and died 1851, and 

G 7. Charlie Albert, born in 1854, and died 1855. 

Mrs. Mildred G. Hiter is a member of the Reform or Christian 
church. Mr. Hiter is a farmer in Montgomery county, Tennessee, 
and is one of the best of men — a perfect gentleman. 

F 8. Middleton Ewing Wilcox, son of John E., was born in 
1822; educated under Captain John D. Tyler; read law but never 
practiced it; is one of the best practical farmers in the country; i& 
a citizen of Clarksville, Tenn. His health being delicate, he em- 
ploys his time reading and attending to the duties and requirements 
of the Order of 1. 0. 0. F. , of which he is a prominent member, 
and at this time (1859) a representative of the Grand Lodge of Ten- 
nessee to the U. S. A. Grand Lodge at Baltimore, Md. He has 
never married. 

F 9. Hannah Eglantine Wilcox, daughter of John E., was born 
in 1824; was educated at the Russellville, Ky. , Female Academy; 
married, in 1843, Needham Bryan Whitfield, and settled on a farm 
near Clarksville, Tenn. Mr. Whitfield was born in 1821 ; was a 
good farmer, but fanatical on the subject of religion. He was a 
member of the Baptist church, and died in 1858. She (Hannah E.) 
had nine children, viz. : 

G 1. Eugene, born in 1844, and died in 1848. 

G 2. Hervey, born in 1847. 

G 3. Miriam Elizabeth, born in 1849. 

G 4. John Ewing, born in 1850, and died 1851. 

G 5. Thomas Chesterfield, born in 1852, and died 1855. 

G 6. Eugenia Gerandine, born in 1853. 

G 7. Ezma, born in 1855. 

G 8. George Neville, born in 1857. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 245 

G 9. Bryan Eglantine, born in 1858. 

This closes the posterity of Mrs. Elizabeth Wilcox, daughter of 
Thomas and Mildred McC. Rowland. Mrs. Elizabeth Wilcox makes 
her home with her youngest daughter, Mrs. Whitfield, at or near 
Clarksville, Tenn., since the death of her husband. All the family 
live in Montgomery county, Tennessee, within ten miles of where 
they were born and raised, except Dr. Chesterfield Lewis Wilcox, 
who lives at Graysville, Todd county, Ky. 

E 4. Nancy Rowland, daughter of Thomas and Mildred, was 
born in Rutherford county, North Carolina, in 1785. She married 
William Sadler; emigrated to Arkansas, where they both died in 
Yell county about 1849 or 1850. The following are the names of 
their eleven children : 

F 1. Matilda Lewis; F 2, Lucian Overton; F 3, Theodore Pres- 
ton; F 4, Malinda Adeline; F 5, Gramalda Carbelow; F 6, Rufus 
Crispinus; F 7, Golesby Argyle; F 8, Thomas Rowland; F 9, James 
Thilman; F 10, Sarah Sophia, and F 11, Belonia Levina. 

F 1. Matilda L., married a Mr. Carnes. 

F 2. Lucian 0., married Miss Willie Lewis, and died in 1853, 
leaving two children, viz. : G 1, Lewis Rowland, and G 2, Lucian 
Overton, Jr., who died in childhood. 

F 3. Theodore P. Sadler, was born in 1809, and was twice 
married; in 1834 to Clarissa 0. Logan, and in 1842 to Mary Ann 
Haney, of South Carolina. He had two children by the first wife, 
and five by the second, viz. : 

G 1. Leander Leantine Sadler, born in 1835; married a Miss 
Crownover, and resided in Yell county, Arkansas. 

G 2. Clarissa Matilda Sadler, born in 1843. 

G 4. Nancy Sadler, born in 1846. 

G 5. Melinda Adeline. 

G 6. Christopher Sanford, died. 

G 7. William Thaddeus, resides in Yell county, Arkansas. 

F 4. Melinda Adeline, daughter of William and Nancy Sadler, 
married Abraham S. Meek, and had three children, viz. : G 1, 
Nancy Matilda; G 2, Martha Jane; G 3, Sarah Sophia. Melinda 
Adeline died in 1838. 

F 5. Gramalda C. , son of William and Nancy Sadler, married 
Ann Eliza Logan, and had seven children, viz. : G 1, Napoleon 
Dupree, born 1838; G 2, James Logan, born 1840; G 3, David Mor- 
ris; G 4, Hadley Hurlbert; G 5, Sarah Jane; G 6, Mary Amanda, 
and G 7, Ann Eliza. 



246 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

F 6. Rufus C, son of William and Nancy Sadler, married, im 
1837, Elizabeth Murphy, and left nine children, viz. : G 1, James 
Overton, born 1838; G 2, Sarah Sophia, died; G 3, Thomas Row- 
land; G 4, William Randolph; G 5, Delia Ann; G 6, Kandury 
Katura; G 7, Rufus Crispinus; G 8, Roberta Rufina, and G 9, Cave. 
They reside in Yell county, Arkansas. 

F 7. Golesby Argyle, son of Nancy and William Sadler,, 
married Angeline Peavy, in 1840; raised ten children and died im 
Arkansas. His children are: G 1, Nancy Ann; G 2, Dial 
Peavy; G 3, Belonia Levina; G 4, Lucian Overton; G 5, James 
Thilman; G 6, Gramalda Carbelow; G 7, Ann Eliza; G 8, Thursday, 
and G 9, Sarah Sophia. 

F 8. Thomas Rowland, son of Nancy and William Sadler, died 
single in Texas. 

F 9. James Thilman, son of Nancy and William Sadler, "mar- 
ried Thursday Thompson, in 1839; had three children, and died in 
Yell county, Arkansas, in 1855. His children were: G 1, 
Roarer Decalur; G 2, Pearl Eliza; G 3, James Thilman, born 185S 
in Yell county, Arkansas. 

F 10. Sarah Sophia, daughter of Nancy and William Sadler, 
married, in 1840, Jonathan Logan, and resides in Yell county, 
Arkansas. They had ten children, viz. : G 1, Nancy Levina, bora 
1841; G 2, Rachel Cornelia; G 3, Augustus C, was killed in the 
Confederate war; G 4, Christopher Columbus; G 5, David Boone; 
G 6, Gertrude; G 7, Eldora, and G 8, Alice Chandler. 

F 11. Belonia Levina, daughter of Nancy and William Sadler, 
was twice married; first, to Hymenus Sadler, her cousin; [second, 
to Franklin Scott, in 1866. She had four children, viz. : G 1, 
Albert Elliott; G 2, Duke, etc. 

E 5. T. Lewis Rowland, son of Thomas and Mildred Lewis, was. 
born in Rutherford county. North Carolina, in 1788; married Eliza- 
beth Burrows in 1809; emigrated to Randolph county, Missouri, 
where they both died about 1850. Their children were: F 1, 
Demarquis ; F 2, Mary ; F 3, Jane ; F 4, Peter ; F 5, Elizabeth, etc. 

E 6. Frances Rowland, daughter of Thomas and Mildred Lewis, 
was born in Rutherford county. North Carolina, in 1790. She mar- 
ried Edward Goode, of Rutherford county, North Carolina, where 
she died in 1835, leaving the following-named children: 

F 1. Nancy Poindexter; F 2, Taliaferro Lewis, died single in 
1834; F 3, Garland Dickerson; F 4, Mildred Rowland; F 5, Eliza- 
beth Hopson, and F 6, Richard Thomas. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 247' 

F 1. Nancy, daughter of Edward Goode, married Wallis Peter' 
Goode, a cousin, and had the following children: G 1, Minerva 0.,- 
born 1833; G 2, Frances M., born 1837; G'3, Margaret E., born 
1839; G 4, Edward S., born 1841; G 5, Oliver W., born 1843; G 6, 
Mary L., born 1844; G 7, James M., born 1845; G 8, Martha J., 
born 1848; G 9, Sarah A., born 1851; G 10, Garland T., born 1852, 
and G 11, John C, born 1859. Nancy P. Goode resides in Ruther- 
ford county. North Carolina. 

F 3. Garland Dickerson, son of Edward Goode, married Melinda 
Orr; has three children, viz.: G 1, Frances Cornelia; G 2, Sarah 
Jane, and G 3, Margaret Ann. Post-office, Muskrat, Bradley, Tenn. 

F 4. Mildred Rowland Goode, daughter of Edward, married 
James Armstrong; has no children. 

F 5. Elizabeth Hopson, married Clinton Armstrong, and has ten 
children, viz.: G 1, Frances Rowland; G 2, Nancy; G 3, James; 
G 4, Harriet; G 5, Henry Clay; G 6, Eliza; G 7, Thomas; G 8, 
Pauline Price; G 9, Sarah, and G 10, William Garland. 

F 5. Richard Thomas Goode, son of Edward, married a Miss 
Dorsey; had two children, viz. : G 1, Eliza, and G 2, Thomas Talia- 
ferro. 

F 6. Sarah Stephens Goode, married John Epperson; has chil- 
dren, viz. : G 1, William Miles; G2, Mahala Magdalene; G 3, Green. 
Craig Miles; G 4, Nancy Caladonia; G 5, Joseph Pinckney. 

Edward Goode, after the death of Frances Rowland, his first 
wife, emigrated and settled in Bradley county, Tennessee, taking 
with him all of his children except Nancy P., where he married hi& 
second wife, Elizabeth Armstrong. 

E 7. John Sharp Rowland, son of Thomas and Mildred Lewis, 
was born in Rutherford county. North Carolina, in 1795. In 1816 
he married Frances M. Lewis, his cousin, daughter of Joel Lewis, 
of Spartanburg District, S. C, and his wife, Mary W. Machen, 

Joel Lewis, son of David, had but two children, viz. : Dr. John 
W. Lewis and Mary W. Lewis, wife of John S. Rowland, who after 
their marriage, settled in Spartanburg District, S. C, where he was 
for many years tax collector of the District, and a merchant at 
Spartanburg Court House. In 1839 he moved to Cass, now Bartow 
county, Georgia, where he engaged in farming and trading. He 
was the owner of a very valuable mineral springs in said county, 
known as "Rowland Springs," which was very much resorted to 
during the summer season, by thousands of votaries of pleasure 
and seekers of health. 



2-18 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

In 1863 Cass county was divided, and a new county organized 
called Bartow. 

[From the Southern Confederacy, published at Atlanta, Ga., December 31, 1862.] 

Major John S. Rowland, of Bartow count}', has presented to the Justices 
of the Inferior Court of said county two hundred bushels of corn for the 
use of families of soldiers; and Messrs. Quinby and Roberson, of the same 
county, have made a donation to the Inferior Court of one thousand bushels 
of corn, and ground it free of toll, for the same noble purpose. Such gen- 
erous liberality deserves to be recorded. The people, and especially the 
brave and patriotic soldiers of Bartow, should know that they have such 
true, patriotic and liberal-hearted friends at home as Major Rowland and 
Messrs. Quinby and Roberson in these days of speculation and extortion. 
God bless such generous souls! Bartow. 

[From the Weekly Mississippian of September 30, 1863.] 

Major John S. Rowland, the efficient superintendent of the Western & 
Atlanta Railroad, died at Atlanta on Saturday last from diarrhoea. 

Major John S. Rowland was a very energetic business man. He was 
about five feet ten inches in height, with dark hair, eyes and skin, weigh- 
ing about two hundred pounds. 

Frances M. Lewis, his wife, is a woman that has no superior, and but 
few equals in point of great fortitude, untiring industry and perseverance. 
She has taken a great many premiums of money, premium plates, silver 
cups, .etc., at the agricultural fairs in Georgia by the exhibition of her own 
work, such as woolen blankets, cotton blankets, negro cloth, carpeting, 
coverlets, comforts, jeans, diapers, plaids, flannels, patchwork, etc. 

James Charles Rowland, in speaking of her indefatigable industry, once 
facetiously remarked that "when his brother John's wife got to heaven, 
should there be any spinning and weaving going on there, she would be 
placed at the head of that department." 

Frances M. and John S. Rowland had eleven children, viz. : 
F 1. Mary Lewis, born 1818; F 2, Mildred Emily, born 1819; 
F 3, John Lewis, born 1822, died in infancy; F 4, Eliza Frances, 
born 1824; F 5, Joel Thomas, born 1827; F 6, John Lewis, born 
1830; F 7, Wm. Lewis, born 1833; F 8, Joseph Preston, born 1835, 
died in infancy; F 9, Harriet Elizabeth, born 1837, died in infancy; 
F 10, Joseph Henry, born 1839, died in infancy, and F 11, Robert 
Hayne, born 1842. 

F 1. Mary Lewis Rowland, daughter of John S., was born in 
1818 and married Joseph Michael, a merchant at Spartanburg C. 
H., S. C, in 1836. They had two children, both of whom died in 
infancy. Joseph Michael died in 1840. Mrs. Mary L. Michael 
married again, in 1851, Dr. S. C. Edgeworth, and resides in Cass, or 
Bartow county, Georgia. Dr. S. C. Edgeworth is a relative of the 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 249 

celebrated authoress, Miss Maria Edgeworth, of Edgeworthtown, 
Ireland. For her biography, the reader is referred to another page 
of this work. 

F 2. Mildred E. Rowland, daughter of John S., was born in 
1819; married Ck)l. Henry H. Thompson, a lawj'er of Spartanburg, 
S. C, in 1838, son of Richard Thompson, of Spartanburg, S. C. 
Mrs. Mildred E. Thompson had six children, viz.: Gr 1, Henry H., 
married a Miss West, of Charleston, S. C. ; G 2, John S. Rowland, 
married Martha Jane Clawson ; G 3, Mary F. , married Hazel Scaife, 
Spartanburg, S. C. ; G- 4, Mildred E., married Thomas Nowell, 
Gafney Citj*, S. C. ; G 5, W. Wadd}-, married Jessie Means; Gr 6, 
Eugenia Edgeworth, married Ladson Mills. 

G^ 2. J. S. R. Thompson, died August 28, 1889, when the fol- 
lowing obituary notice appeared in the Yorkville Enquirer: 

COL. J. S. R. THOMPSON. 

It was with feelings of deep regret that our citizens received tidings on 
Wednesday last of the death of Col. J. S. R. Thompson, a former citizen of 
our town, who died suddenly at his residence in Spartanburg on Wednesday 
morning. It was known here that Col. Thompson's health was in a low 
state, he having not long since spent several weeks in Yorkville for the pur- 
pose of recuperating and resting, and though our people were not entirely 
unprepared for the event the news was a severe shock. 

Col. J. S. R. Thompson was the second son of the late Col. H. H. 
Thompson, and was born in Spartanburg in 1841. He graduated from the 
Soutli Carolina College a short time before the war, and entered the Con- 
federate service as a private in the Palmetto Sharpshooters. Before quit- 
ting the service he attained the rank of orderly sergeant, but after hav- 
ing been in the army two years he was assigned to the enrolling department 
and served in it until the close of the war. 

On the 10th of August, 1863, he married Miss Martha J. Clawson, of 
Yorkville, and settling down in this place he commenced the stud}' of law. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1868, and after several j'ears' successful 
practice at the Yorkville bar, he moved to Spartanburg, where he continued 
more assiduously than ever, and with marked success, the practice of his 
chosen profession. He was mayor of Spartanburg for two terms, and also 
represented that county in the general assembly. 

Prom a just tribute to his worth, published in the Spartanburg Herald 
of last Saturday, we talve the following: 

"Considered altogether. Colonel Thompson was a very remarkable man. 
He was not a genius, unless we accept the definition that ' genius is the 
result of labor as applied to talent,' for he had wonderful capacity for 
labor, and all the application that talent could demand for its highest 
development. He was one of the best all-round lawyers in the State, being 
apparently equally as good in criminal or civil cases, on the law or on the 



250 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

equity sides of the courts. No wonder then, that with his wonderful' 
application and capacity for labor, his faithful and conscientious attention 
to his business, his sincere love for, and pride in, his profession, as well as. 
his remarkable kindness and courtesy, both in and out of the courts — no 
wonder, we say, that he should have won a position among the first lawyers, 
in the county and State, and that his reputation should be more than local 
in its character. He will be missed and regretted at the bar ; he will be^ 
deeply lamented by his friends; he will be sadly missed by this commu- 
nity ; but sadder than all these, he will be missed, regretted, lamented^ 
mourned and yearned for by his sorrowing family. 

" His funeral was held Thursday afternoon at the Episcopal church, of 
which he was a member. All the stores were closed and the city bell tolled 
the requiem, and the whole city assembled at the grove in respect for a 
man whom all honored and esteemed. The Knights of Honor, the Knights 
and Ladies of Honor and the Knights of the Golden Rule, of each of which 
he was a member, all were represented. Col. Thompson was at one time 
Supreme Commander of the Knights of the Golden Rule, and was one of 
its most useful and valued members. His funeral showed the respect and 
esteem in which this community held him." 

Issue of Mary F. Thompson and Hazel Scaife: 

HI. Mildred Emily; H 2, Henry Eugene; H 3, Hazel; H 4, 
Mary Agnes, died 1882, and H 5, Kowland Edgeworth. 

F 5. Joel Thomas Rowland, son of John S., born 1827; married 
Louisa J. Keith, daughter of the Hon. Charles F. Keith, of Athens, 
McMinn county, Tenn., in 1852. He settled in Tennessee in 
1855 and died in 1856, leaving two children, viz. : G 1, John S., and 
G 2, Charles Keith. 

F 7. William Lewis Rowland, son of John S., born 1833, and 
married in 1855, Serene J. Dillard, from Lawrence District, South 
Carolina. He is a farmer and is living on the Etowah river in Bar- 
tow county, Georgia. The other children of Major John S. Rowland 
were all single in 1856. 

E 8. William Tillman Rowland, son of Thomas and Mildred 
Lewis, was born in Rutherford county, North Carolina, in 1797. 
In 1819 he married Mrs. Hamlin, whose maiden name was Emily 
Edgeworth, and was the daughter of John Edgeworth, of Edge-: 
worthtown, Ireland, who emigrated to America in 1790. Emily waa 
a relative of the celebrated authoress, Miss Maria Edgeworth, of 
Edgeworthtown, Ireland. 

[From Blake's Biographical Dictionary, page 3M.] 
Richard L. Edgeworth was born at Rath in 1744 and died at Edgeworth- 
town June 13, 1818. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, and next 
at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, from whence he removed to the Temple^ 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 251 

Instead, hcp'ever, of studying the law, he applied the mathematical 
sciences and became an excellent mechanic. In 1767 he invented the tele- 
graph, which, many years after, he saw generally adopted. He also con- 
trived several agricultural instruments and wheel carriages upon new prin- 
ciples. On going to France he was employed in directing the works across 
the Rhine at Lyons. In 1780 he became a member of the Royal Societ}-, 
and in 1785 he was named in the patent for establishing the Royal Irish 
Academy. He proved a great benefactor to that part of the country where 
he resided by making railways, draining bogs and introducing an improved 
system of agriculture. Some years before he died he formed aspire for the 
church of Edgeworthtown, which was all constructed of frame work on the 
ground and then elevated by machinery to the town, where it was fixed. 
Mr. Edgeworth published : 1. Poetry Explained ; 2. Readings on Poetry ; 
3. Essays on Practical Education, 2 vol., 8vo.; 4. Professional Education; 
5. Letter to Lord Charlemont on the Telegraph ; 6. Essay on the Construc- 
tion of Roads, besides various tracts and papers in the Philosophical Trans- 
actions, the Transactions of the Royal Irish Academy, etc. He was married 
four times and had several children, one of whom, Miss Maria Edgeworth, 
is well known by her excellent publications and the continuation of her 
father's memoirs, from which this is extracted. 

[From Blake's Biographical Dictionary.] 

Maria Edgeworth, a distinguished authoress of Great Britain and a 
daughter of Richard Lovell Edgeworth, was born January 1, 1763. She 
has been admitted to be a woman of rare genius by all who are familiar 
with her works. She commenced her successful literary career about the 
year 1800, and in her earliest productions she was aided bj' the suggestions 
and advice of her father. The famous "Essay on Irish Bulls" was the 
joint production of herself and father. Her " Castle Rackrent " abounds 
in admirable sketches of Irish life and manners, and for fifty years after- 
ward was admired and read without anj' seeming abatement of interest. 
Her "Belinda," a novel portraying real life, is descriptive of some of the 
most striking traits in Irish character. 

In 1804 she published her "Popular Tales," and two years afterward 
"Leonora," a novel in two volumes. In 1809 she issued "Tales of Fash- 
ionable Life ; " in 1812 three other volumes of "Fashionable Life," and in 
1814 her novel called "Patronage." Before the publication of her Irish 
stories nothing of the kind had ever been presented to the public. They 
produced a great effect, not merely on the reading world, but also on that 
of literature and politics. 

Walter Scott admits that he commenced his Scottish novels with the 
desire of emulating Miss Edgeworth. 

To offer a complete list of her works of fiction would exceed the limits 
of this memoir ; but the last which appeared, in 1834, under the title of 
"Helen," was a masterpiece of beautiful conception and descriptive 
imagery. She was blessed with a long life, numerous firm friends and held 
a distinguished place in English and Irish societj-. 

But few tourists of worth or note ever visited Ireland during the last 



252 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

fifty years of her life without bearir.g testimony of her vivacity and her 
great value in the large circle in which she associated. She died at Edge- 
worthtown, County of Longford (Ireland), May 21, 1849. 

Emily Edgeworth, daughter of John, was born in Charleston, S. C. , 
in 1793. Her father married the widow of Sir Francis Knapp, of 
Dublin, in Ireland, whose maiden name was Bridget Ryan, and 
emigrated to America in 1790. 

William Tillman Rowland, Sr. , son of Thomas, married (as before 
mentioned) Emily Edgeworth in 1819; located at Greenville C. H., 
S. C. , where he kept a hotel for many years previous to his death, 
which occurred in 1838. 

After his death the following obituary notice appeared in a 
Greenville paper: 

OBITUARY. 

Died at his residence in this vicinity on Tuesday, the 36th inst., after a 
protracted illness, Mr. William T. Rowland (senior), in the forty-second 
year of his age. Thus has fallen in the meridian of life a gentleman 
extensively known in this community — one who has long been an active 
and useful citizen of our village, one whose uncommon share of the social 
virtues and habitual discharge of all the duties which spring from the 
relations of man to man attracted the affectionate esteem of his numerous 
friends during his life, and in his death elicits emotions of unaffected sor- 
row and regret. Alas! it is not friendship alone that bewails this calamity; 
the anguish and tears of a devoted wife and family of children attend this 
affecting event. 

They who have best known and appreciated the domestic virtues of the 
husband and father, who have been blessed with the fruits of his energetic 
exertions and provident solicitude for their welfare and whose affection and 
love have most tenderly reciprocated the feelings of the heart now forever 
stilled in death feel, more keenly than others can describe, the pangs of 
bitter sorrow now that his "days are passed" and his "purpose of life are 
broken off." Than the deceased few were so courteous in manners, so kind 
and obliging in disposition ; highly prizing whilst he won the approbation 
and regard of his friends and neighbors. 

The grateful remembrance of the estimable and endearing qualities of 
the departed, though it enhances our regard for his loss, bears with it also 
a solace to our minds, which time will only increase, that he who possessed 
those qualities in this world and who delighted in their practical use will 
not be unrewarded with the joys of the next before that Being who esteems 
a benevolent service done to the least of his creatures as one rendered unto 
Himself, and gives the hope that " after life's fitful fever he sleeps well ; " 
to have the deep repose of the grave which encloses him only broken by 
the dawning of that day which knows no night. 

Greenville, S. C, June 29, 1838. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 253 

The following inscription on his tombstone may be found at 
Greenville C. H., S. C. : 

SACRED TO THE MEMORY 
— OF — 

WILLIAM TILLMAN ROWLAND, 

Who departed this life 

On the 26th of June, 1838, 

In the forty-second 3-ear of his age. 



He raised three children, viz, : 

F 1. Sophia Frost, born 1820. 

F 2. William Tillman, Jr., born 1822; died single. 

F 3. Thomas Robert, born 1823, etc. 

F 1. Sophia Frost Rowland, married Henry Montague Earle ia 
1838, and has the following-named children: 

G 1. William Edward, born 1839. 

G 2. Emily Edge worth, born 1841. 

G 3. Mary Montague, born 1843. 

G 4. John Hamlin, born 1845, etc. 

F 2. Major William Tillman Rowland, Jr., died single at Green- 
ville C. H, S. C, in 1843. 

The following obituary notice appeared in a Green\ille paper: 

OBITUARY. 

Died at Greenville C. H. on the 20th Inst., Major William T. Rowland, 
in the 2?th year of his age. It is enough to say of the lamented deceased 
that he died without an enemy, and with the friendship and kind feelings of 
our whole community. Scrupulously just and honorable in all his dealings, 
imassuming, sincere, kind and benevolent in his feelings, he has left a char- 
acter untouched with even the imputation of an unjust or ungenerous action. 

Major Rowland has been for the last two years, Intendendant of our 
town, an office to which, although so young a man, he was called by the 
undivided suffrages of his neighbors, and the duties of which he has dis- 
charged to the satisfaction of all. 

Greenville, October 27, 1848. 

The following is a copy of the epitaph upon his tombstone : 



SACRED TO THE MEMORY 
— OF — 

WILLIAM T. ROWLAND, Jr., 

Who departed this life 

On the 20th of October, 1848, 

In the twenty-seventh year of his age. 



254 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

F 3. Thomas Kobert, third child of Wm. T. Kowland and his 
wife, Emily Edge worth, was born in 1823. He is a merchant at 
Oreenville C. H., S. C. In 1847 he married Elizabeth Sloan 
Brooks, and has the following-named children: 

G 1. William Edgeworth, born 1850. 

G 2. John Brooks, born 1852. 

G 3. Bettie, born 1854, etc. 

E 9. James Charles Rowland, son of Thomas and Mildred, was 
born in Rutherford county. North Carolina, in 1800; was a twin. 
In 1827 he married Mary Wilkins, daughter of Robert, near Goucher 
Meeting-house, on Goucher Creek, in the eastern part of Sgartan- 
barg District, S. C. She had but two brothers — William and Rus- 
sell, and no sister. In 1821-2 James C. sold goods at Lockhart's 
Shoals, in Union District, S. C, and after his marriage he sold 
goods in Spartanburg District, for some years. After the death of 
his wife he emigrated to Wetumpka, Ala., where he spent a few 
years, after which he moved to Montgomery, Ala. After the death 
of his children in the Confederate war he returned to South Caro- 
lina, and died in 1886. He had four children by Mary Wilkins; 
only two lived to be grown. Their names were: F 1, James, and 
F 2, William ; both died in the Confederate Army. 

E 10. Melinda Jane Rowland, daughter of Thomas, was born in 
Rutherford county. North Carolina, in 1800, and was a twin sister 
to James Charles. She married Dr. Anderson Thomas, in 1824, in 
Greenville District, S. C, and died in Elmore county, Alabama, in 
1889. She had eight children, viz. : 

F 1. Mary Jane, born 1825. 

F 2. Pauline Louisa, born 1827. 

F 3. Josephine Elizabeth, born 1828. 

F 4. Jerome, born 1830, and died 1836. 

F 5. Orlando Lewis, born 1832, and died 1832. 

F 6. Mildred Susan, born 1835. 

F 7. Sarah Frances, born 1838. 

F 8. John Mclver, born 1840, and died 1841. 

F 1. Mary Jane, daughter of Dr. Thomas, married in 1842, 
Thomas J. Mitchell, and has children, viz. : 

G 1. Pauline Thomas, born 1848; G 2, Louise, born 1850; G 3, 
John William, born 1852; G 4, Josephine Taylor, born 1854; G 5, 
Anderson Lewis, born 1857; G 6, Claudine M., born 1861. 

F 2. Pauline Louisa, daughter of Dr. Thomas, married William 
A. Graham, in 1845. Mr. Graham is a relative of General George 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 255 

<3raham, of Revolutionary fame, and also of Governor "William A. 
Oraham, of North Carolina. Pauline died in 1852, and left two 
children, viz. : 

G 1. Robert Leonidas, born 1849; G 2, Mary Caroline, born 
1851, and died 1853. 

F 3. Josephine Elizabeth, daughter of Dr. Thomas, born in 
1828; married James Blakely Taylor, in 1847, and resides at 
Wetumpka, Ala. They have children, viz. : 

G 1. Elbert Frances, born 1848; G 2, Holt, born 1850; G 3, 
Henry Mitchell, born 1852; G 4, Walter Thomas, born 1855; G 5, 
Shernlan, born 1857; G 6, James Blakely, born 1861; G 7, Mary 
Josephine, born 1862. 

F 6. Mildred Susan, daughter of Dr. Thomas, born in 1835. 

F 7. Sarah Frances, daughter of Dr. Thomas, born in 1838. 

G 6. Claudine M. , daughter of Dr. T. J. Mitchell, was born in 
1861, and married in 1889, Charles A. Owen, They reside at Ware, 
Elmore county, Ala., and have (in 1891) two children, viz.: H 1, 
Melinda Thomas, born 1890, and H 2, William Terrell Lewis, born 
1891. 

E 11. Richard Demarquis, son of Thomas Rowland and his wife, 
Mildred McCoy Lewis, was born in 1802. He weighed about two 
hundred pounds. His height was about five feet and ten inches, 
with dark hair and florid complexion. In 1828 he married Nancy A., 
daughter of Dr. Ryan, on Broad river, in Chester county. South 
€arolina. He settled near Jacksonville, in Calhoun county, Ala., 
where he died in 1849, and his wife in 1855. They had five chil- 
dren, viz. : 

F 1. Mildred Anna, born in South Carolina, in 1829. 

F 2. Thomas Ryan, born in South Carolina, in 1834. 

F 3. William Thilman, born in 1836, and died 1836. 

F 4. John Daniel, born in 1837, in Calhoun county, Alabama. 

F 5. Mary Elizabeth, born in 1842, in Calhoun county, Alabama. 

F 1. Mildred Anna Rowland's weight is about one hundred 
pounds, with blue eyes and dark hair. She married Thomas L. 
Wakely, of Jacksonville, Ala., in 1849, and had the following- 
named children, and died: 

G 1. Richard David, born 1850; G 2, John Clark, born 1852, 
and died 1853; G 3, George Rowland, born 1854, and G 4, Thomas 
Ryan, born 1856. 

F 2. Thomas Ryan Rowland weighed about one hundred and 
fifty pounds, with fair complexion, blue eyes and light curly hair. 



256 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

He was a merchant at Jacksonville, Ala. He married, in 1855, 
Mary E. Stipes, of Jacksonville, by whom he had four children, 
viz. : 

G 1. George Demarquis, born 1856; G 2, William Tilghman, 
born 1857, etc. 

In 1861, when the tocsin of war was sounded, Thomas Ryan 
Rowland threw aside his yard-stick, bade adieu to his young wife and 
little babes, shouldered his musket, marched to the battlefield and 
fell a martyr to freedom's cause. His first service was in the 10th 
Alabama Regiment in Virginia, and in consequence of ill-health he 
procured a substitute ; but so soon as his health was recovered he 
enlisted again under John H. Morgan. In an engagement, at the 
town of Augusta, in the extreme northern part of Kentucky, on the 
banks of the Ohio river, he was wounded in the leg, which was am- 
putated and from the effects of which he died and was buried at 
Cynthiana, Ky. 

F 4. John Daniel Rowland, the fourth child of Richard Demar- 
quis, was a member of General John H. Morgan' s original regiment. 
For some time previous to the close of the war he was Second Lieu- 
tenant of General Wheeler' s escort, and was on stafl'-duty with Gen- 
eral Wheeler a great portion of the time. 

He was very fortunate while in service; was never wounded, 
captured, nor confined a day with sickness. 

His height was five feet six inches, weighed one hundred and 
thirty pounds, with light hair, gray eyes and fair complexion. He 
was a merchant in Jacksonville, Ala., where he died. 

F 5. Mary Elizabeth, fifth child of Richard Demarquis Rowland, 
was born in 1842. She weighed about one hundred pounds, had blue 
eyes, light hair and fair complexion. She married Mr. H. A. Earns, 
resided at Jacksonville, Ala. , and had children as follows : 

G 1. Nancy Catharine, born 1862. 

G 2. Thomas Rowland, born 1863, and died 1863. 

G 3. John Daniel, born 1865. 

G 4. Annie Alice, born 1868. 

G 5. Archibald Demarquis, born 1869, and died 1870. 

G 6. Harriet Rowland, born 1870. 

G 7. Mary Augusta, born 1872. 

Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Earns died in Jacksonville, Ala., in 1874. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 257 



CHAPTEE Xn. 

CHARLES C. LEWIS. 

D 5. Hon. Charles Crawford Lewis, son of John and his wife, 
Sarah Taliaferro, was born in Albemarle county, Virginia, in 1761. 
He was a hatter by trade. 

He emigrated to Rutherford county, North Carolina, with liis 
father before the Revolutionary war, and settled on Mountain creeii, 
four miles west of Rutherfordton. 

At the time of their settlement in North Carolina the country was 
infested with Indians, bears, wolves, etc., which proved a great 
source of annoyance to the early settlers. 

On one occasion he was out hunting with his dog and gun and 
unexpectedly came in contact with a large bear on his farm. The 
dog encountered the bear in a fight and had it over and under for a 
few minutes, but the bear proved an over-match for the dog oa 
account of the great difference in their sizes and would soon have 
dispatched him but for the timely aid of Charles, his master, who, 
to save his dog, fired hastily at the bear, but missed his aim; he 
loaded again in a great hurry and neglected to ram down a wad on 
his shot, and by the time he got his gun loaded the bear had the dog 
in his embrace and was giving him some of his most affectionate 
hugs. Charles rushed upon the bear with his gun, placed the muzzle 
against the side of the bear and fired ; but having no wad on his 
shot, as he lowered the muzzle of the gun the shot all ran out; but 
he fired, notwithstanding, and the burning of the powder set Bruin's 
wool on fire, which, together with the report of the gun, alarmed 
him so that the bear let loose the dog and made his escape in double- 
quick time to the nearest jungle. 

He had often heard the old bear-hunters spin their long yarns 

about their wonderful adventures, their hair-breadth escapes, their 

hand-to-hand fights, their shooting and stabbing the bears, but he 

was always rather incredulous as to the stabbing part, until he had 

the above-mentioned encounter with the bear himself, which removed 

all his doubts and feelings of incredulity. 

When the Revolutionary war commenced he was only fourteen 

years of age, but after he arrived at a proper age was in the ser\ice. 
17 



258 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

It is not known how long he served in the army as he never applied 
for a pension. 

After his death the following certificate (now filed in the archives 
of the War Department at "Washington City) was found among his 
papers, which, together with other living evidence, enabled his 
widow to prove his services and to draw a pension : 

This is to certify that Charles Lewis, Sergeant, has faithfully served out 
his tour of three months, in General Lillington's brigade, to the southward, 

Robert Gilkey, Captain. 

Andrew Hampton, Colonel. 
Charleston, S. C, March 24, 1780. 

He acted as a magistrate for some years in Rutherford county, 
North Carolina, after which he was elected in 1798 as a member in 
the House of Commons of the State Legislature and only served one 
term. It was the only time that he ever aspired to that office. His 
name can. be found in Wheeler's History of North Carolina on page 
400. He was afterward elected, during life or good behaviour, to 
the office of register of the county, which office he held upward of 
thirty years, until about the time of his death, which occurred in 1833. 

He was strictly honest and upright in all his dealings with 
mankind. 

In 1786 he married Elizabeth Russell, daughter of George Rus- 
sell, from Ireland, whose wife was the widow of John Whiteside and 
whose maiden name was Molly Underwood. 

Elizabeth Russell was born in Rutherford county. North Carolina, 
in 1770. She was about five feet three inches in height, weighing 
about one hundred and fifty pounds, with black hair and ej^es, and 
dark skin. In 1848 she made a profession of religion and attached 
herself to the Baptist church at Mountain Creek Meeting-house in 
Rutherford county. North Carolina, and died in 1851. 

She was a descendant of Molly Brown, the widow of John Brown, 
who emigrated from Ireland to Virginia. John Brown died shortly 
after his arrival in Virginia, leaving an only son, Richard, 

His widow afterward married, in Virginia, Joseph Underwood, 
by whom she had four more children, viz.: 1, Elizabeth; 2, Lett}^; 
3, Joseph, and 4, Molly. 

1, Elizabeth Underwood, first married Matthew Deavenport, by 
whom she had two sons, Griover and John, of Rutherford county. 
North Carolina. After the death of her first husband she married 
Samuel King, by whom she had five children, viz. : 

1. Joseph, married a Miss Morgan. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 259 

2. Samuel, married a Miss Kelly. 

3. Jonathan, married a Miss Taylor. 

4. Benjamin, married a Miss Shipman. 

5. Elizabeth, married a Mr. Taylor. 

2. Letty Underwood, married Mr. Guffy and emigrated to 
Missouri. 

3. Joseph Underwood died a bachelor in Buncombe county, North 
Carolina, aged one hundred and six years. 

4. Molly Underwood, was born in 1734, and died in Rutherford 
county. North Carolina, in 1828. She first married John Whiteside, 
Sr., by whom she had three children, viz. : 1, Thomas; 2, Mary, and 

3, John, Jr. John, Jr., was twice married; first to Eleanor Kelly, 
by whom he raised ten children, viz. : 

1. William, married Elizabeth Ledbetter. 

2. Mary, married Richard Ledbetter. 

3. Moses, married Anna Hemphill, Rosa Mackey and Ann 
Shackelford. 

4. Elizabeth, married John Ledbetter, Gabriel Wilmot and 
Jones Bradley. 

5. Thomas, married Rachel Hemphill and Jane Flack. 

6. Nancy, married Johnson Ledbetter. 

7. Sarah, married Washington Harris. 

8. John U. , married Ruth Hemphill and Martha Burns. 

9. Aaron W. , married Elizabeth Lewis, and 

10. Jonathan, married Nancy Lewis, daughter of Chas. Lewis. 
Mary Whiteside, daughter of John, Sr., married Henry Kelly 

and had eight children, viz.: 1, William; 2, John; 3, George; 

4, Jacob; 5, Elisha; 6, Mary; 7, Eleanor, and 8, Sarah. 

After the death of Eleanor Kelly, the wife of John Whiteside, 
Jr., he married a Miss Sarah Cook, by whom he had two children, 
viz.: 1, Eleanor, married Mr. Williams; 2, Joseph, died single. 

After the death of John Whiteside, Sr. , his widow (Molly Under- 
wood) married George Russell, Sr. , an Irishman, who was killed by 
the Indians while on a bear-hunt soon after the close of the Revo- 
lutionary war. 

George Russell, Sr., lived about ten miles west of Rutherfordton, 
N. C, on Broad river, where the Hickorynut Gap Road crosses said 
river, at a plantation which has since been owned by George Russell, 
Jr., John U. Whiteside, Elias Lynch and others. The first settle- 
ment was made on the west side of the river; at this place George 
Russell, Sr. , was living during" the Revolutionary war when Ferguson 



260 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

and his army marched as far west as his house, which they plundered 
and then returned to the East. What money the family had was in 
silver; when they saw the army approaching the house they threw 
the bag of money in a little barrel of feathers that stood in the 
corner of the house. When the soldiers entered the house they 
commenced plundering and appropriating everything they saw 
proper to their own uses; one of them ran his arm down into the 
barrel of feathers, grabbed the bag of money and left. All the bed 
clothes and wearing apparel that the family saved were such as they 
carried to the swamp and were stowed away in a hogshead before 
the arrival of the army. 

Molly Underwood had but two children by Geo. Kussell, her sec- 
ond husband, viz.: 1, George, Jr., and 2, Elizabeth Russell. 

George married Minta Reavis and had the following-named 
children, to-wit: 

1. David, married Rachel Bagwell. 

2. Polly, married Joseph Dial. 

3. William, married Hannah Reavis. 

4. Elizabeth, married James Dial. 

5. Sarah, married Robert Neely. 

6. John, and 

7. Matilda, married Mr. Brittain. 

George Russell, Jr., finally emigrated from Rutherford county, 
North Carolina, to Missouri, and has never been heard of since, 

Charles C. Lewis and Elizabeth Russell were married in Ruther- 
ford county, North Carolina, in the year 1786. They had thirteen 
children but raised only twelve, viz. : 

E 1. Geo. Russell, born 1788; died single in Winston county, 
Mississippi, 1867. 

E 2. Pitman, born 1789; married lantha Dalton; died in Ruther- 
ford county, North Carolina, 1858. 

E 3. Mary, born 1791; married Moses Simmons; died in Ruther- 
ford county, North Carolina, 1877, 

E 4. Sarah, born 1793; married Joshua Simmons; died in 
Marshall county, Mississippi, 1891. 

E 5. John, born 1795; died a bachelor in Rutherford county. 
North Carolina, 1883. 

E 6. Mildred, born 1799; married Colonel Ed. Patterson; died 
1856; buried in South Carolina. 

E 7, Elizabeth, born 1800; married Aaron W. Whiteside; died 
in North Carolina, 1862. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 261 

E 8. Charles C, Jr., born 1802; married Jane Flack; died in 
Texas, 1846. 

E 9. Nancy, born 1804; married Jon. Whiteside and John Dickey. 

E 10. Preston, born 1806; married Martha Blanton; died in 
Kutherford, N. C. 

E 11. Jesse T., born 1808; married Susan Cowart, Rutherford, 
N. C. 

E 12. Wm. Terrell, born 1811 ; married Eliza J. Steele and Mary 
Ann B. Norton, Winston county, Mississippi. 

D 5. Charles Lewis, Sr. , and his wife, Elizabeth, both died in 
Rutherford, N. C, on the same farm upon which he settled before 
the Revolutionary war. He died in 1833 and she in 1851. 

E 1. George Russell Lewis, eldest child of Charles, was a black- 
smith by trade. After he arrived at majority he located at Pendle- 
ton Village, S. C, and worked at his trade a few years. He 
hen engaged n clerking and afterward engaged in farming. He 
at length became intemperate, spent his property and finally 
became an itinerant pedagogue. He emigrated to Mississippi, where 
he made a profession of religion and joined the Baptist church at 
Antioch, in Winston county. He died a bachelor near Webster, 
W^inston count}'. Miss., in 1867. 

E 2. Pitman Lewis, son of Charles C, Sr., was a blacksmith by 
trade, but when he became of age he settled on a farm about one 
mile north of his father's old homestead, where he spent his life in 
seclusion. He was about five feet seven inches high, with black 
hair and eyes. 

When Pitman made his settlement on his farm game was very 
plentiful in the country, and like a " nimrod " he spent much of his 
time in the chase after the deer. During one of his hunting 
excursions he wounded a very large buck which his dog pursued to 
the nearest water-course, where he kept the deer "at bay" until he 
arrived. The deer being badly wounded and tired, he concluded 
that he had nothing to do but to walk in, take him by the antlers, 
lead him to the shore and dispatch him, but to his great astonishment 
the deer was not so docile ; he bristled up, turned his hair the wrong 
way and pitched into him for a fight, but as he made his thrust he 
seized him by the horns. Then came the "tug of war" with. pugnis 
et calcibus ; he fought with his hands and the deer with his feet, and 
by the time the fight was over the deer had torn nearly all his clothes 
off and had cut his flesh considerably. During the scuffle he felt for 
his knife to cut the deer's throat, but it was lost and he was left in 



262 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

rather an awkward predicament, for it appeared that if he held on 
the deer would kill him with his feet and if he let him go he would 
probably gore him to death with his horns; so he was at a loss 
whether to ' ' hold on " or " let go. ' ' Fortunately, he found a pin in 
the lapel of his coat; with this he pricked out the deer's eye and 
stealthily made his escape, until he found a pine knot with which he 
knocked him on the head. 

He married, in 1837, lantha, daughter of Wm. Dalton, in Ruther- 
ford county, North Carolina, where he died of dropsy in 1858, leav- 
ing four children, viz. : 

F 1. Elizabeth, born 1838; married Wm. H. Cantrell in 1862. 
He was a lieutenant in the Confederate war. He raised eight chil- 
dren and died near Boiling Springs, Spartanburg county, S. C. , where 
his wife and children were residing in 1891. His children are: 

GT 1. Ella Lavinia, born 1863, and married Coatesworth Wall 
near Brannon, Spartanburg, S. C. 

G 2. Louisa Jane, born 1864. 

Q 3. Sallie lantha, born 1866. 

Gr 4. Albert Sydney, born 1870; married Dora Clement, Bran- 
non, S. C. 

G 5. Stella May, born 1874. 

G 6. Leola, born 1875. 

G 7. Charles T, born 1877, and 

G 8. Victoria Carolina, born 1879. 

The family are Baptists. Their membership is at Boiling 
Springs, S. C. 

F 2. Charles Rufus, son of Pitman Lewis, born in 1840. 

F 3. Mary Louisa, born 1843; post-office, Rutherfordton, N. C. 

F 4. Pinckney Pitman, born 1847 in Rutherfordton, N. C. In 
1891 he married Hattie Boatright, of Mecklenburg, N. C. His post- 
office is Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Charles Rufus was in the Confederate Army stationed at Golds- 
boro, N. C, and finally committed suicide by hanging himself. He 
never married. 

E 3. Mary Lewis, daughter of Charles C, Sr., was born in 1791 
in Rutherford, N. C. She was about five feet eight inches high, 
weighing about one hundred and eighty pounds, with black hair, 
blue eyes and dark skin. She was a very pious woman, devoted to 
the service of God and was an exemplary member of the Methodist- 
Episcopal church. 

In 1811 she married Moses Simmons, son of James and brother 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 263 

of Joshua. Moses was also a member of the Methodist church. 
They lived some three miles below Island Ford ou Broad river, in 
Rutherford county, North Carolina. , where he died very suddenly in 
1856. Mary, his wife, died in 1877. They raised twelve children, 
viz. : 

F 1. John Drayton, born in 1812; married Mary Ann Riley. 

F 2. Charles Lewis, born in 1814; married Hulda Williamson 
and Mary Harrison. 

F 3. Mary Mansfield, born in 1816; married Joseph Howell; died. 

F -4. Mildred, born in 1818; married Warner Hyder, Bellton, Ga. 

F 5. Myra, born in 1820 ; married Richard Hicks, Hicksville, N. C. 

F 6. Moses Waters, born in 1823; married Myra J. Thorn. 

F 7. Richard Lewis, born in 1825; married Margaret Cobb and 
Mrs. Bryan, nee Mary C. Hunter, Yorkville, S. C. 

F 8. James Overton, born in 1827; married Myra Kemp, Island 
Ford, N. C. 

F 9. Elisha Taliaferro, born in 1829; married Mary Ann Petty. 

F 10. Jane Elizabeth, born in 1832; married Thos. J. Campbell, 
Gafney, S. C. 

F 11. Wm. Schieffelin, born in 1834; married Sarah Brooks, 
Atlanta, Ga, 

F 12. Joshua Sylvanus, born 1838; married Miss Armstrong, 

Belton, Ga. 

F 1. John D. Simmons, son of Moses, born 1812; married Mary 
Ann Riley, daughter of James, of Hall county, Georgia. They 
reside near Gainesville, Ga. , and have fourteen children, viz. : 

G 1. Elizabeth Jane, born 1837; married Jas. M. Chamblee, son 
of Elisha, and has children, viz.: HI, Mary Mildred; H 2, John 
Draj'ton; H 3, Lucintha; H 4, Elisha Taliaferro; H 5, George 
Lee, etc. 

G 2. Moses Taliaferro, son of John D., born 1839; died. 

G 3. Laura Louisa, born 1841; married Alonzo Brooks, son of 
Alfred, and has children, viz.: H 1, James Moses; H 2, Mary 
Elizabeth, etc. 

G 4. James Overton, son of John D. , born 1843 ; is in Atlanta, Ga. 

G 5. Mary Mildred, born 1845; married Wm. R. Chamblee, son 
of Elisha, and has children viz.: H 1, Julia Laura, etc. 

G 6. Xancy Eveline, born 1847; married Berrien Brooks, son of 
Alfred, and has children, viz. : H 1, Alfred Cicero, etc. 

G 7. Martha Sapsony, born 1849; died. 

G 8. Susan Adeline, born 1851; G 9, Sarah Ann, born 1853; 



264 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Gr 10, John Robert, born 1855; Gr 11, Julia, born 1857; G 12, Isaac 
Sylvanus, died; G 13, Florence Eugenia, born 1862, and G- 14, Vir- 
ginia Ladora, born 1864; all in Hall county, Greorgia. 

The oldest sons of John D. Simmons were in the Confederate war 
and were in the battles of Manassas, Seven Pines, Yorktown, Get- 
tysburg, Leesburg, Chilesville, Goldsboro, etc. 

F 2. Charles Lewis Simmons, son of Moses, was born in 1814, 
and died in Hall county, G-eorgia, in 1887. He married Hulda 
Willliamson, daughter of Adam, of Hall county, Georgia. After 
her death he married Mary Harrison. He left children, viz. : 

G 1. Vestal Lewis, is in the Rocky Mountains. 

G 2. Augusta Ann, married Thomas Brooks, son of Alfred, and 
died. 

G 3. Moses Sylvanus; G 4, Ophelia; G 5, Mary; G 6, Adam; 
G 7, Florida; G 8, Ella, and G 9, died — no name. 

F 3. Mary Mansfield Simmons, daughter of Moses, born in 1816; 
married Joseph Howell, of York county. South Carolina. After his 
marriage he settled in Hall county, Georgia, where Mary M., his 
wife, died in 1842, leaving three children, viz. : 

G 1. Mary Mansfield, married Thomas Dickson, of Spartanburg, 
S. C. 

G 2. Miriam Mildred, married William Dickson, of York county, 
South Carolina. 

G 3. William Joseph, died in childhood. 

After the death of his wife Joseph Howell married, as his 
second wife, Mary Waters, daughter of Joshua Simmons, of Hall 
county, Georgia. She died without issue. The wives of Joseph 
Howell were first cousins. 

F 4. Mildred Simmons, daughter of Moses, born in 1818; mar- 
ried Warner Hyder, son of Benjamin, Jr., and grandson of Ben- 
jamin, Sr. ; all of Rutherford count}''. North Carolina. 

Benjamin Hyder, Sr., had a brother, Jacob, who died single. The 
name of Jacob can be found in " King's Mountain and its Heroes." 
His sister married reel-footed Jonathan Hampton, whose name can 
also be found in "King's Mountain and its Heroes," by L. C. 
Draper. 

Warner Hyder lives near Belton, Banks county, Ga., and has 
children, viz. : 

G 1. Adam, was killed in Virginia during the war of 1861. 

G 2. James; G 3, Moses; G 4, John; G 5, ir William; G 6, 
Charles; G 7, Dr. Garrett Sylvanus, and G 8, Mary. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 265 

F 5. M}Ta Lewis Simmons, daughter of Moses, born in 1820; 
married Kichard Hiclis, son of Rev. Berry Hicks. He merchan- 
dized many years at Hicksville, Rutherford county, N C, where he 
died in 1863, leaving eight children, viz. : 

G 1. Romeo, is a ph3'sician, practicing at Hicksville, Rutherford 
county, N. C. He was a member of the 1st North Carolina Cavalry 
the last year of the war, and was in a battle on the 27th of October, 
1863, near Surges' Mills, in Virginia. He married Miss C. 0. 
Dickerson, of Rutherford county, North Carolina. 

G 2. Volney, was a member of the Junior Reserves, and was 
engaged in a fight at Morganton in the latter part of the war. He 
married Miss Abi Carpenter, and is now (1890) a merchant at Rath- 
er fordton. 

Q 3. Wellington, is single, and is a cotton buyer. 

G 4. Junius, married Ann McCraw, of South Carolina; is a 
farmer, and his post-office is State Line, S. C. 

G 5. Leonidas, married Sady Burton, of New Prospect, S. C. , 
where he is engaged manufacturing shoes. 

G 6. Zeno, married Nancy McKenney, of South Carolina; is a 
farmer, and his post-office is Ezell, S. C. 

Gr 7. Myra Leonora, and 

G 8. Theodore. 

The family are all Methodists that belong to the church. 

F 6. Moses Waters Simmons, son of Moses, born in 1823; mar- 
ried Myra J. Thorn, and resides near Hicksville, Rutherford county, 
N. C. 

F 7. Richard L., son of Moses, born in 1825; married Margaret 
€obb and Mrs. Mary C. Bryan, nee Hunter, daughter of Dr. John 
Hunter. He had only one child by his first wife, and several by his 
second. He resides in Gaston county. North Carolina. The names 
of his children are as follows: G 1, Clementine; G 2, John Hunter; 
G 3, Mary, etc. 

F 8. James Overton, son of Moses Simmons, born in 1827; mar- 
ried Myra Kemp, daughter of Joshua, near Island Ford on 
Broad river, in Rutherford county, N. C. He has children, viz. : 
G 1, Madora; G 2, George; G 3, Louisa; G 4, James, died; G 5, 
Susan; G 6, Anna, etc. 

F 9. Elisha Taliaferro Simmons, son of Moses, born 1829; mar- 
ried Mary Ann Petty, daughter of George, of Spartanburg, S. C, 
and has children, viz.: G 1, Mary Jane; G 2, Nancy McCoy, and 
G 3, George Elisha. 



266 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY, 

Elisha T, Simmons died in the hospital at Richmond, Va.j, 
during the Confederate war. 

F 10. Jane E., daughter of Moses Simmons, born in 1832; mar- 
ried Rev. Thomas Jeff Campbell, a Baptist minister at Gafney City, 
S. C, They have children, viz.: Gr 1, Moses Sylvanus; G 2, Thomas 
Jefferson, Jr.; G 3, Mary Elizabeth; G 4, James Richard, etc. 

F 11. William Sylvanus, son of Moses Simmons, born in 1834; 
married Sarah Brooks, in Hall county, Georgia, where he re- 
sides. 

F 12. Joshua S., son of Moses, born in 1838; married Miss 
Armstrong, of York county. South Carolina, in 1860. He lost a leg^ 
in the Confederate war, and resides in Rutherford county, North 
Carolina. 

E 4. Sarah, daughter of Charles Lewis, Sr., of Rutherford 
county, North Carolina, was born in 1793. She was a very pious 
and exemplary member of the Methodist Episcopal church. In 
1814, she married Joshua Simmons, brother of Moses. Joshua 
weighed about two hundred and twenty pounds, and Sarah, his wife, 
about one hundred and sixty pounds. They lived in Hall county, 
Georgia, for many years, where Joshua died in 1861. In 1872^ 
Sarah, his widow, moved to Marshall county, Mississippi, and 
resided with her son, Richard 0., where she died January 13, 1891, 
in her ninety-eighth year. She had eleven children, sixty grand- 
children, one hundred and fifty great grandchildren and fifteen 
great great grandchildren at the time of her death. 

Issue of Sarah Lewis and Joshua Simmons: 

F 1. Elizabeth L., born in 1815; married "Wm. C. Chambers. . 

F 2. Dr. James Waters, born in 1816; married Mrs. Henry, nee 
Angeline Elrod. 

F 3. Mary Waters, born in 1818; married Jo. Howell, and died 
without issue. 

F 4. Nancy Lewis, born in 1820; married A. T. Garrison. 

F 5. Dr. Charles Lewis, born in 1822; was killed; never married. 

F 6. Rhoda Emiline, born in 1824; married Burwell F. Wells, of 
Sharon, Tenn. 

F 7. Didama McKenney, born in 1825; married John F. Hud- 
son and A. W. Collins. 

F 8. Emily Eliza, born in 1827; married Ellison E. Crow. 

F 9. Richard Omero, born in 1829; married Mary Ann BuflSng- 
ton and Mrs. Gill. 

F 10. John Taliaferro, born in 1832; died single. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 267 

F 11. Martha Jane, born in 1833; married Jonathan J. Bowen 
and James M. James. 

Issue of Elizabeth L. Simmons and Wm. C. Chambers, viz. : 

G 1. Joshua Sylvanus, born in 1839; was killed at Gettysburg 
in 1863. 

G- 2. Mary Jane, born in 18-41. 

G 3. James Thompson, born in 1844. 

G 4. John Richard, born in 1846. 

G 5. William Lafayette, born in 1848. 

G 6. Henry Smith, born in 1851. 

G 7. Charles Simpson, born in 1855, and 

G 8. Thomas, born in 1858. 

G 1. Joshua Sylvanus Chambers, married Mary E. Scales in 
1859, and has children, viz.: H 1, Sarah Frances; H 2, Joshua 
Sylvanus, born 1866. 

F 2. Dr. James "W. Simmons, son of Joshua, born in 1816; is by 
profession a dental surgeon. In 1854 he married Mrs. Henry, nee 
Angeline Elrod, daughter of George, James W. died in 1868 
from the effect of a wound received below the cap of his knee from 
a scythe blade while cutting wheat in Banks county, Georgia. He 
left children, viz. : 

G 1. Rosa Lee, born in 1854. 

G 2. Charles Crawford, born in 1856, and died 1860. 

F 3. Mary "Waters, daughter of Joshua Simmons, born 1818; 
married Joseph Howell in 1844, the same man who married Mary, 
the daughter of Moses Simmons. Mary died childless in Hall countj', 
Georgia, in 1845. 

F 4. Nancy Lewis, daughter of Joshua Simmons, born 1820; 
married Allen T. Garrison, of Jackson county, Georgia, in 1839, and 
died in Marshall county, Mississippi, in 1874. The}' have issue, viz.: 

G 1. Sarah Eliza, married Wm. J. Hardin and resides near 
Lebanon, Marshall county. Miss., and have children, viz.: H 1, 
John Allen ; H 2, Thomson Bascomb ; H 3, Nancy Jane ; H 4, Dough- 
erty Virginia; H 5, Robert Didama; H 6, Wm. Jackson; H 7, 
Austin Moore, etc. 

G 2. Mary Emeline, daughter of Nancy L. Garrison, born 1843. 

G 3. Hannah Angeline, born 1846; G 4, Andrew Soule, born 
1848; G 5, Nancy Ann, born 1850; G 6, David Bascomb, born 1853; 
G 7, Martha Virginia, born 1 856 ; G 8, Margaret Didama, born 
1859. 

F 5. Dr. Charles Simmons, son of Joshua, bom 1822; was a 



268 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

dental surgeon, and was killed by Dr. Mayfleld at Plum Bayou, Jef- 
ferson county, Ark., in 1871. He never married. 

F 6. Rhoda Emeline, daughter of Joshua Simmons, born 1824; 
married, in 1840, Rev. Burwell F. Wells, of Jackson county, Georgia, 
and now (1885) resides near Sharon, Weakley county, Tenn. They 
have issue, viz. : 

a 1. John T., born 1841; died 1856. 

G 2. James F., born 1843; married Elizabeth Freeman and 
Beanna Fowler, Veal Station, Parker county, Tex. 

G 3. Sarah E., born 1845; married Wm. Gallaher, Shiloh, Den- 
ton county, Tex. 

G 4. Mary E., born 1847; married B. C. Freeman, Waterford, 
Marshall county. Miss. 

G 5. William G., born 1848; married Mattie J. Sigman, Sharon, 
Tenn. 

G 6. Nancy V., born 1851; married James Gilmore, Ennis, 
Ellis county, Tex. 

G7. Joshua T., born 1853. 

G 8. Martha J., born 1856. 

G 9. Amanda C, born 1858; married Austin Evans, Waterford, 
Marshall county, Miss. 

G 10. Charles W., born 1860, Pott's Camp, Marshall county. Miss. 

G 11. Susan A., born 1863; married Rob. Marshall, Richmond, 
Fort Bend county, Tex. 

F 7. Didama McK., daughter of Joshua Simmons, was born in 
1825. In 1843 she married John F. Hudson, by whom she had 
three children, viz.: G 1, Dr. George Wesley; G 2, Wm. Fletcher; 
G 3, Martha Jane. 

Mr. Hudson died in Pulaski county, Arkansas, in 1853. In 1856 
his widow married J. W. Collins, of Saline county, Arkansas. They 
resided near Camden, in Ouachita county, Ark., where she died in 
1891. She was a very pious woman and a devout member of the 
Methodist-Episcopal church. Her funeral was preached by Rev. J. 
F. Carr and Rev. E. M. Munroe. 

Mr. Collins was a gallant soldier, and was wounded in the shoulder 
while fighting for the rights of the Confederacy. 

F 8. Emily E., daughter of Joshua Simmons, born 1827; married 
Ellison Crow in 1855. He resides near Panceana, Orange county, 
Fla. They have issue, viz. : 

G 1. John Randolph, born 1856. 

G 2. Joshua Thomas, born 1859 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 269 

G 3. Samuel Jefferson, born 1862. 

G -i. Braxton Bragg, born 1863. 

G 5. Alvin Benson, born 1865. 

F 9. Kichard Omero, sou of Joshua Simmons, born 1829 ; married 
Mary Ann Bufflngton in Hall county, Georgia, in 1852. They resided 
near Waterford, Marshall county, Miss. TMiey had eight children. 
Mary Ann, his wife, died in 1887, after which he married Mrs. Gill, 
as his second wife, in 1888. The names of their eight children are: 

G 1 and G 2, Emily Eliza and Joshua, both died in childhood. 

G 3. Sarah Elizabeth, born 1855- married Willis Henderson near 
Waterford, Miss. They have children, viz.: H 1, Mary; H 2, 
John, etc. 

G 4. Mary Savannah, daughter of R. 0. Simmons, born 1857; 
married Henry Gill. They have children, viz.: H 1, Mamie; H 2, 
Mattie; H 3, James, etc. 

G 5. Julia Clare, born 1860 ; married John Gilmore at Waterford. 

G 6. Richard Filoe, born 1861. 

G 7. Joshua Thomas, born 1864, and 

G 8. Charles Lewis, born 1866; married, in 1887, Miss 

Barber. 

F 10. John Taliaferro, son of Joshua, born 1832; died single in 
Auburn, Ala., in 1861, 

F 11. Martha Jane, daughter of Joshua Simmons, born 1835; 
married, first, Jonathan Bowen, of Campbell county, Georgia, in 
1850, by whom she had two children, viz. : G 1, Nancj' Didama, born 
1852, and G 2, Joshua Thomas, born 1854, who married Gertrude 
A. Dickerson and died without issue. 

Mr. Bowen was a Confederate soldier and sacrificed his life in 
defense of Southern rights. He was killed near Atlanta, Ga., in 
1864. After his death his widow married John M. James, who lost 
a leg in the same war. They have issue, viz. : 

G 3. Lewis Washington James, married Kate Rousseau. 

G 4. Sarah E., married John S. Bowden. 

G 5. Flora Ann, married John C. Smith, and 

G 6. Mary Lee, married Thomas Blair. 

Their post-oflflce is Lithia Springs, Douglas county, Ga. 

E 5. John Lewis, son of Charles Lewis and Elizabeth Russell, of 
Rutherford county. North Carolina, was born 1795. He was a 
soldier in the War of 1812; went as a substitute for William White- 
side, under John Carson, to fight the Indians, and was stationed the 
most of his time at Wadesboro, N. C. He was allowed a pension by 



270 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

the United States Government for his services. He was about five 
feet eight inches in height, weighing about one hundred and fifty 
pounds. He died an eccentric bachelor, four miles west of Ruther- 
fordton, N. C, in 1883, in the house built by his father. 

E 6. Mildred McCoy, daughter of Charles C. Lewis, Sr., was 
born in 1799 ; married Colonel Edward Patterson, of Spartanburg, 
S. C, son of Wm. Patterson, of Bedford county, Virginia. He 
served a twelve months' tour in the War of 1812, and was stationed 
the most of his time on Bull's Island, near Charleston, S. C. 

He was a merchant and farmer, and resided on Pacolet river, 
opposite the celebrated Pacolet Springs, until about the year 1837, 
when he moved and settled within one mile of Spartanburg C. H., 
S. C, where he died in 1842. His mother resided with him and 
lived to be one hundred years of age. A short time before her death 
she was preadmonished in a dream that she would die on a certain day 
and that her son, Edward, would die within a month afterward. 
AVhen that day arrived she actually died, and exactly one month 
from that day her son died, also, though not without being also fore- 
warned of his approaching dissolution. As he was shaving himself 
one morning he ceased suddenly, wheeled around, manifesting great 
perturbation of mind. His wife, discovering his emotion, inquired 
of him as to the cause. He replied that "he had that moment been 
warned of his death, which would take place within a few days. ' ' 

He made his will; his wife took charge of all his business, and 
he died within a few days from constipation of the bowels. 

He was about five feet five inches high, with light hair and blue 
eyes, weighing about one hundred and twenty-five pounds. 

A few years before his death he made a profession of religion and 
attached himself to the Methodist- Episcopal church and, like his 
aged mother, ' ' prayed without ceasing. ' ' 

He was an afl'ectionate husband, an indulgent father, a kind 
master, an humble Christian and an honest, upright man in all his 
dealings. 

After the death of Colonel Patterson the cares and responsibilities 
of his wife became so great that within a few years her general health 
declined so much that she paid a visit to Epps' Springs, in North 
Carolina, owned by her son, Wm. G., with a view of improving her 
health, where she died in 1856. Her remains were deposited by the 
side of her husband at their old homestead near Spartanburg C. H. 

In the Carolina Spartan, a paper published at Spartanburg C. H., 
S. C, the following obituary appeared September 18, 1856: 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 271 

OBITUARY. 

Died at the residence of her son William, at Epps' Springs, Shelby 
county, N. C, on Wednesday, the 10th inst., Mrs. Mildred Patterson, widow 
of the late Edward Patterson, of Spartanburg, S. C, in the fifty-fifth year 
of her age, after a short illness of five days. 

Mildred Lewis was born in Rutherford county, North Carolina, on the 
7th day of May, 1799, at a time when virtue, industry and economy were 
regarded as the only sure and safe roads to happiness and prosperity. At 
the age of nineteen she married Edward Patterson, then a resident of 
Pacolet Springs, in Spartanburg District, where they lived until about the 
year 1837, when he bought land and built near Spartanburg C. H., where 
he died shortly after, leaving Mrs. Patterson and twelve children — none of 
whom were grown. Shortly after his death her responsibilities were in- 
creased by the birth of another daughter, making eight daughters and five 
sons, all of whom were young and dependent upon her. 

Such was the confidence which her husband had in her energy and 
cfiscretion that he bequeathed to her absolute control during life, or widow- 
hood, over his entire estate, both real and personal, consisting of several 
plantations and a number of negroes, and the faithful and successful dis- 
charge of her trusts for fourteen 3'ears of toil and responsibility, as the sole 
manager and head of a large family, proved that the unlimited confidence 
of her husband was not misplaced. She raised and educated all her children 
without detriment to the estate, the most of whom are now grown and mar- 
ried, and all live to cherish and honor the memory of their noble mother. 

A member of the Methodist church for many years previous to her 
death, she practiced in the fullness of human perfection all the cardinal 
virtues of that faith. A devoted and aflfectionate mother, she was no less 
a. kind and prudent mistress. As a neighbor she was, emphatically, the 
good Samaritan. All were her neighbors, and all shared alike her bounty 
and her kindness. As a friend and companion, frank, cheerful and happ3', 
she was alwaj's the life and soul of the social circle. It was impossible to 
be otherwise than pleasant and happy in her company. In fine, she was 
the purest model of a Christian, a mother, a mistress and a friend. "None 
knew her but to love her " — the rich and the poor, the bond and the free, 
delighted to love and admire her general and noble impulses. And hence, 
pride, selfishness, env}', moroseness and their concomitants fled from her 
presence as from the glance of destinj'. 

But alas! mysterious Providence, not all the virtues of the just on earth 
can secure us against the shafts of the fell destroyer directed by Thine 
inscrutable hand. Dreadful, indeed, is the warning when the gay and 
thoughtless drop into the silent tomb ; but equallj- solemn and impressive 
is the lesson to the living when the pure and lovely of earth are borne to 
the grave. Such, nevertheless, is the will of God, and although Mildred 
Patterson no longer lives to aid us bj' her counsels or cheer us with her 
smiles, yet we know that her sainted voice swells the chorus of heaven in 
songs of eternal joy, and it is our dutj' to submit without a murmur to the 
will of Him whose will is the law of the universe. 



272 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

She leaves many friends, besides her children, bowed down with grief, 
whose only but joyous consolation is that they can truthfully and without 
doubting exclaim in the language of the poet : 

Go, sainted mother, thy toils, thy suffering's o'er, 

Enjoy that perfect bliss denied below; 
Go, and with angels, on a happier shore. 

Reap the rich recompense of every woe. 

From mortal darkness to the throne of day, 

Ah, never did a purer spirit rise. 
More meekly firm, more innocently gay, 

More humbly good or charitably wise. 

Yet still we weep the mother and the friend 

Snatched by death's relentless hand from our eyes; 
Oh, teach us, as o'er the tomb we bend. 

To trace thy steps and join thee in the skies. 

W. 

Mildred and Edward Patterson had thirteen children and all 
lived to be grown, viz. : 

F 1. Harriet Elizabeth, born 1819; married E. S. E. Chambers. 

F 2. Madison Lewis, born 1820; married Augusta P. Benning. 

F 3. William George, born 1823; married Rebecca Hogue. 

F 4. Sarah Adeline, born 1825; married Jacob Walker. 

F 5. Giles Jarret, born 1827; married Mary Jane Gage and Mrs. 
Winsmith. 

F 6. Mary Drucilla, born 1829; married Lawson Wilson. 

F 7. Jane Eliza, born 1831; married Jas. Y. Cooper. 

F 8. Hester Caroline, born 1833; married Jas. Heath. 

F 9. Robert Hayne, born 1835; married Martha Walker. 

F 10. Albert Edward, born 1836; married Lizzie Dardeu. 

F 11. Mildred Anna, born 1839. 

F 12. Laura Cleone, born 1840; married R. H. Porter and John 
Cuthburtson. 

F 13. Adora Eugenia, born 1843; married Mr. Smith. 

F 1. Harriet E., born 1819; is fiA^e feet high, weighing about 
one hundred pounds, with black hair, blue eyes and dark complexion. 
She married, in 1842, Elliot S. E. Chambers and resided at or near 
Stices Shoals, in Cleveland county, N. C. After the death of Mr. 
Chambers she resided near Gainesville, Ga. Mr. Chambers was 
about five feet eight inches high, weighing about one hundred and 
fifty pounds, with light hair and blue eyes. He taught school in 
early life, and afterward engaged in the manufacture of iron, flour, 
etc. He was also a merchant, and was a very enterprising business, 
man. Her post-office is Gainesville, Ga. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 273 

They have had the following-named children, but only two or 
three are living, viz. : G 1, Mildred Anna, died; G 2, Giles Madison, 
died; G 3, Charles Augustus, died; G 4, Edward Patterson; G 5, 
Adella Louisa, etc. 

F 2. Madison L., born 1820; is five feet six inches high, weigh- 
ing one hundred and twenty pounds, with sandy hair and blue eyes. 
He is a lawyer and farmer located near Oswichee, Russell county, 
Ala. In 1852 he married Augusta P. Benning, of Columbus, Ga., 
daughter of Pleasant Mhoon Benning and his wife, Melinda Lewis 
White, who was a descendant of General Robert Lewis and of 
Nicholas Meriwether, of Virginia. 

There were three brothers, William, David and Nicholas Meri- 
wether, who originally emigrated from Wales to Virginia. David 
died without issue. William had one daughter, who married a man 
by the name of Skelton. From them descended Meriwether Jones, 
of Richmond, Va., celebrated as a political writer over sixty years 
ago; General Walter Jones, the distinguished lawyer of Washington 
City; General Roger Jones, of the regular army, and Commodore 
Catesby Jones, of the navy. 

Madison Lewis Patterson married Augusta Palmira, daughter of 
Pleasant Mhoon Benning and his wife, Melinda Lewis White, 

Melinda L. White was a daughter of Richard P. and his wife, 
Mary Meriwether, of Harris county, Georgia. 

Mary Meriwether was a daughter of Thomas and his wife, Jane 
Lewis, daughter of Robert, of Albemarle county, Virginia, and his 
wife, Jane Meriwether, daughter of Nicholas (the emigrant) and his 
wife, Elizabeth Crawford, daughter of David, of New Kent county,, 
Virginia. 

Richard P. White and his wife, Mary Meriwether, had five chil- 
dren, viz.; Thomas M., William, Nicholas M. , Clement B. and 
Melinda Lewis, all of whom died without issue except the latter, 
who married Pleasant Mhoon Benning and had eleven children, six 
of whom died in infancy. Sarah Amanda Benning died seventeen 
years of age. 

General Henry Lewis Benning was born in 1814, was a graduate 
of Franklin College at Athens, Ga., and was a lawyer by profession; 
served one term of six years as one of the judges of the Supreme 
Court of Georgia. His term of office expired the last of December, 
1859. He married, in 1839, Mary Jones, daughter of Colonel Sea- 
born Jones, of Columbus, Ga,, who is also a lawyer of high repute 
in Georgia. 



274 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Daring the Confederate war Judge Benning served as a Brigadier- 
General, and was assigned to tlie command of the brigade lately 
commanded by General Toombs. 

[From the Mississippiaii, October 6, 1863.] 
We learn that Brigadier-General Benning's horse was shot under him 
during one of the late battles on the Chickamauga, and that he dismounted, 
cut a horse loose from an artillery wagon, mounted it bareback, returned 
to his command and was seen, with the utmost sangfroid, eating a biscuit 
amid the din and clangor of arms. 

Richard Edwin Benning, born in 1818; married Frances Simpson, 
daughter of Robert Simpson, of Harris county, Georgia. 

He is a farmer and resides in said county. 

Caroline Matilda Benning, born in 1824; married Benjamin Yancy 
Martin in 1842, then of Abbeville, S. C, but now of Columbus, Ga. 
Mr. Martin is a lawyer, and is a reporter of the decisions of the 
Supreme Court of Georgia. Caroline died in 1858. 

Augusta P. Benning, the youngest, was born in 1827, and was 
married, in 1852, to Madison Lewis Patterson, a son of Colonel 
Edward Patterson and his wife, Mildred Lewis, of Spartanburg, S. C. 
M. L. Patterson was a lawyer by profession and for many years was 
engaged in merchandising at Columbus, Ga. He now resides at or 
near Oswichee, Russell county, Ala. 

M. L. Patterson was a descendant of John Lewis, of Hanover 
county, Virginia, and Augusta P. Benning a descendant of General 
Robert Lewis, his brother, of Gloucester county, Virginia. 

Madison L. Patterson and his wife have the following-named 
children : 

G 1. Pleasant Benning, born in 1856. 

G 2. Edward Morris, born in 1861. 

G 3. Mildred Lewis, born in 1863. 

G 4. Jerome Augustine, born in 1869. 

G 5. Madison Lewis, born in 1870. 

Their post-office is Oswichee Russell county, Ala. 

F 3. William George, son of Colonel E. Patterson, was born in 
1823. He is about five feet ten inches in height, with light hair, 
blue eyes and fair skin. He owns the Epps Mineral Springs in 
Shelby county, North Carolina, a place of great resort during the 
summer seasons by invalids and votaries of pleasure. He was a 
soldier in the Confederate Army and was captured and retained as 
a prisoner during the war. His post-office is Shelby, N. C. 

In 1848 he married Rebecca, daughter of David Hogue, of Cleve- 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 275 

land county, North Carolina. Thej^ have the following-named chil- 
dren : 

G 1. David Edward, born in 1848. 

G 2. William Lewis, born in 1850. 

G 3. Charles Jacob, born in 1854. 

G 4. Harriet Chambers, born in 1858. 

G 5. George, born in 18G0. 

G 6. Leonard P. Hayne, born in 1862. 

F 4. Sarah Adaline, daughter of Colonel E. Patterson, was born 
in 1825. She is about five feet three inches in height, and weighs 
one hundred and twenty-five pounds. In 1852 she married Jacob 
Walker, son of John A. Walker, of Spartanburg, S. C, where she 
resided until after the death of her husband, when she and her chil- 
dren moved and settled near Hatchechubbee, in Kussell county, Ala. 
She has the following-named children: 

G 1. Lewis Patterson, born in 1853. 

G 2. Augusta Benning, born in 1855. 

G 3. John Edward, born in 1858. 

G 4. Jacob Allen, born in 1860. 

G 5. Eugenia Adora, born in 1862. 

F 5. Hon. Giles Jarret Patterson, son of Colonel Edward, was 
l)orn in Spartanburg county, South Carolina, in 1827. He was five 
feet ten inches in height, with dark brown hair and blue eyes. He 
is a graduate of South Carolina College at Columbia. He studied 
law and was admitted to practice in 1852, and located at Chester- 
ville, S. C. In 1857 he was elected Commissioner in Equity. After 
serving some years in that office, he was elected as Senator in the 
State Legislature. In 1855 he married Miss Mary Jane, daughter 
of Dr. John Gage, of Union county. South Carolina. 

The Gage family was from Colerain, Count}' of Antrim, Ireland. 
There were three brothers— Robert, John and Matthew. Robert 
died in Ireland. His son, John, emigrated with his uncles, John 
and Matthew, to Union, S. C. John moved from Union, S. C, to 
Winston county, Mississippi, where he died. His brother, Matthew, 
moved to, and died in, Holmes county, Mississippi. Dr. John, son 
of Robert, married a Miss Nanc}' McKibben, and died in Union, 
S. C. He raised five children, viz. : 

1. Colonel Robert, married Martha Williams. 

2. Christopher, married Louisa Gist. 

3. Dr. James, married Mary Jane Lewis. 

4. Nancy, married Mr. Patton. 



276 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

5. Mary Jane, married Giles J. Patterson, Esq. 

After the death of Mary Jane Gage, his first wife, he married 

Mrs. Winsmith, near Glenn Springs, S. C, by whom he had 

three children. The following notice we copy from the Shelby 
Aurora, a North Carolina paper: 

DEATH OF A PROMINENT SOUTH CAROLINIAN. 

Giles Patterson, Esq., a wealthy banker and prominent citizen of 
Chester, S. C, died a few days ago. He was a brother of Mrs. Harriet 
Chambers and William G. Patterson, of Patterson's Springs, and his many 
friends in North and South Carolina will regret to hear of his death. 
Deceased was born in Spartanburg county, South Carolina, and was about 
sixty-five years old. Leaves a wife and three children, viz.: G 1, Giles J.> 
Jr., etc. 

Thursday, December 17, 1891. ' 

[ Prom the Yorkville Enquirer.] 
LETTER FROM CHESTER. 

DEATH OF HON. GILES J. PATTERSON. 

It is doubtful whether in the history of Chester, she has sustained a 
greater loss by the removal of any citizen, than in the death of Hon. Giles 
J. Patterson, which occurred yesterday morning. The illness, which was 
pneumonia, lasted but little more than a week. At the funeral this after- 
noon at 3:30, which will take place from the Methodist church of which 
he was a valued member, there will be many sympathetic friends of the 
esteemed deceased. The following communication from the town council 
was circulated this morning : 

Chester, December 14, 1891. 

We, the Intendant and Council of the town of Chester, S. C, do most 

respectfully request that all places of business be closed in honor of the 

Hon. Giles J. Patterson, deceased, during his funeral, which will take 

place from three to five o'clock this p. M. 

S. M. Jones, Intendant. 

Mr. Patterson was chairman of the Board of School Trustees, and in 
respect to him the school will attend the funeral in a body. The Lee Light 
Infantry, of which he was once Captain, and always an ardent friend, will 
escort the remains to the cemetery. All the church bells and the town 
bell will be tolled, and the flag on the City Hall will be at half-mast. He 
was loved by his friends, and honored and respected by his enemies, if he 
had such. 

F 6. Mary Drucilla, daughter of Colonel E. Patterson, was born 
in 1829. In 1855 she married Lawson Wilson, of Crowder's Creek, 
P. 0., Gaston county, N. C. Mr. Wilson read law, then turned his 
attention to farming. They have children, viz. : 

G 1. Mildred Adora, born in 1857. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 277 

G 2. Sarah Louisa, born in 1859. 

Gr 3. Hester Cleone, and 

G 4. William, died. 

F 7. Jane Eliza, was born in 1831. In 1860, she married, at the 
residence of her brother, Robert Hayne, in Winston county, Missis- 
sippi, James Y. Cooper, son of James Cooper, near Cedar Springs, 
in Spartanburg county, S. C. Mr. Cooper served through the Con- 
federate war; had his clothes riddled by bullets, but received no 
flesh wound. He resided near Mushulaville, in Noxubee county, 
Miss., as a farmer until after the death of his wife. He then 
located in Macon, Miss., as a merchant, and married, as his second 
wife, Miss Alice Farmer. He finally located in Anniston, Ala., where 
he died in 1890. He had four children by his first wife, viz. : 

G 1. James Y., born 1861; died 1864. 

G 2. Willie, born 1863; died 1864. 

G 3. Lula Jane, born 1865; Anniston, Ala. 

G 4. Ed. Patterson, born 1867; post-office, Anniston, Ala. 

James and Willie were both attacked with diphtheria in the fall 
of 1864 and died within a few days, while their father was absent in 
the army. Their anxious mother, who was expecting to learn from 
every messenger that returned from the seat of war that their father 
was killed, now had her cup of sorrow filled to overflowing. 

Weep not because thy loved ones have left thee, 
Weep not that the}' are in the dark grave ; 

Remember, mj' sister, the hand that bereft thee 
Has taken away onlj- that which He gave. 

Remember He chasteneth to show his great love; 

Then murmur no more, but let 3'our heart say: 
" I'm the mother of angels now dwelling above — 

'Tis God who has taken my darlings away." 

A mother of angels! Oh, with that one thought 

Let the chains of thy sorrow be riven. 
As through life's long pathway j-ou joyfully walk 

'Till you meet your two angels in heaven. 

Mrs. Cooper was an humble and pious member of the Methodist- 
Episcopal church at Mushulaville, Noxubee county, Miss. She was 
cheerful, kind and courteous with all whom she had intercourse, and 
was much beloved and esteemed by all who knew her. She was 
suddenly called from time to eternity in February, 1868, leaving an 
affectionate husband, two little children and many relatives and 
friends to mourn her loss. Her funeral was preached by Rev. A. 



278 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

J. Coleman, and her remains deposited in the grave-yard at Mrs. 
Kuff's, three miles west of Mushulaville, in Noxubee county, Miss.^ 
where her tombstone can be found with the following inscription 
upon it: 



IN MEMORY OF 

JANE E., 

Consort of J. Y. Cooper, 

Born April 27, 1831 ; 

Died February 6, 1869. 

Asleep in Jesus; blessed sleep, 
From which none ever wake to weep. 



Mr. J. Y. Cooper now (1886) resides in Anniston, Ala., with his- 
second wife, Alice Farmer. 

F 8. Hester Caroline Patterson, was born in 1833. She is about 
five feet one inch high, weighing one hundred and fifteen pounds, 
with blue eyes and sandy hair. In 1859 she married James Heath, 
of Union county, North Carolina. Their children are, viz. : G 1,. 
James Edward, died ; G 2, George Lawson, died ; G 3, Blanche ; G 4, 
John Dossey, etc. 

F 9. Robert Hayne Patterson, was born in 1835. He was about 
five feet ten inches in height, weighing one hundred and thirty-five 
pounds, with fair skin, blue eyes and dark hair. He married 
Martha, daughter of Jacob Walker, of Spartanburg county, South 
Carolina. Susan, the first wife of Jacob "Walker, was a daughter of 
John Cannon and sister of Dr. Ibra Cannon and of Hon. Gabriel 
Cannon, who was Representative and Senator from Spartanburg in 
the State Legislature of South Carolina, and from 1856 to 1858 was- 
Lieutenant-Governor of South Carolina. 

R. H. Patterson was a soldier in the Confederate war, was a 
member of Company D, Captain Rogers, commanded by W. F. 
Tucker, in 41st Mississippi Regiment. He was wounded in the finger 
at Perry ville, Ky., in 1862, was taken prisoner at Chickamauga and 
was confined in prison at Camp Douglas sixteen months, where he 
died in February, 1865, from pneumonia. He left two children, 
viz. : G 1, Albert Edward, and G 2, Susan. After his death his 
widow married Dr. Jno. Inabnet, of Mushulaville, Miss., who finally 
moved to Texas and resides at Terrell. Susan Patterson, hia 
daughter, married Hugh McLeod and resides at Athens, Tex. 

F 10. Albert Edward Patterson, son of Colonel Edward, was born 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 279 

in 1836. He is five feet six inches in lieight, with very light hair, 
dark sliin and blue eyes. In 1867 he married Lizzie Darden, of 
Alabama, and resides near Columbus, Ga. His post-office is Hatche- 
chubbee, Russell county, Ala. 

F 11. Mildred Anna Patterson, daughter of Edward, was born in 
1839. She is about five feet one inch high, weighing about one 
hundred and twenty pounds, with blue eyes and auburn hair. Her 
post-office is Crowder's Creek, Gaston county, N. C. 

F 12. Laura Cleone Patterson, daughter of Colonel Edward, was 
born in 1840. She is about five feet one inch in height, weighing 
one hundred and fifteen pounds, with blue eyes and fair skin. In 
1859 she married Robert H. Porter, of Lancaster District, South 
Carolina. Their post-office is Fort Hill, York District, S. C. Mr. 
Porter was a cavalry man in the Confederate Army and was stationed 
most of his time at Pocataligo, S. C, where he died in 1864. They 
had one child, viz. : G- 1, Lula May, born 1860. 

In 1866 Laura C. married John Cuthburtson, of Charlotte, N. C, 
by whom she had children, viz. : G 2, Anna Eugenia, etc. Their 
post-office is Monroe, N. C. 

F 13. Adora Eugenia Patterson, daughter of Colonel Edward, was 
born in 1843, after the death of her father. She married Mr. Smith; 
post-office, Monroe, N. C. 

E 7. Elizabeth Lewis, daughter of Charles C, Sr., was born in 
1800. In 1821 she married Aaron Whittington Whiteside, son of 
John. Elizabeth Lewis' mother and A. W. Whiteside's father were 
half-brother and sister; consequently they were half-cousins. They 
lived on the head-waters of Broad river in the western part of Ruth- 
erford county, thirteen miles from Rutherfordton, where they both 
died, he in 1855 and she in 1862. They were both members of the 
Baptist church. They raised five children, marked F, viz. : 

F 1. Sarah Eveline, born in 1825. In 1843 she married Madison 
Lynch, son of Elias Lynch, the great corn monger. Elias Lynch 
married a daughter of John Deavenport; therefore Madison Lynch 
and Sarah E. , his wife, were third cousins. 

They live on the head-waters of Broad river in the western part 
of Rutherford county. North Carolina. Madison Lynch, like his 
father, is a very energetic business man. Their post-office is Green 
Hill, N. C. They have the following-named children : 

G 1. Julia Adelaide, born in 1844; married Mr. James Merriman, 
a lawyer by profession, of Asheville, N. C. 

G 2. Adora Elizabeth, born in 1846, and died in 1848. 



280 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

G 3. George Washington, born 1848; G 4, Laura Louisa, born 
1851; G 5, Charles Martin, born 1853; G 6, Thomas Madison, born 
1855; G 7, Henry Harrison, born 1858; G 8, Ada, born 1860; G 9, 
Ida, born 1862; G 10, Fannie, and G 11, Matrick. 

F 2. Almina Clementine Whiteside, daughter of Aaron W. , was 
born 1827, and married, in 1849, Batey Blanton, of East Tennessee. 
They had the following-named children: G 1, George Washington, 
born 1850; G 2, Wm. Hackett, born 1853; G 3, Jonathan Batey, 
born 1857. Mr. B. Blanton died in 1858. After the death of Mr. 
Blanton Almina C. married Mr. Wilson, of Shelby, N. C. 

F 3. Louisa Jane, daughter of A. W. Whiteside, born 1829. In 
1849 she married Benjamin Hedrick, of East Tennessee. She had 
two children and died in 1852. Her children were: G 1, Louisa 
Elizabeth, born 1852, etc. 

F 4. Jonathan Marion Whiteside, son of Aaron W. , was born in 
1832. In 1852 he married Sarah Minerva Caroline Hedrick, sister 
to Ben. Hedrick, of East Tennessee, by whom he had one son: G 1, 
Thomas Whittington, who died in 1855. His wife also died in 1855. 
In 1856 he married Lucinda Mullinax, of Yorkville, S. C, by whom 
he had one child, G 2, Wm. Albert James, when his second wife 
also died. 

He volunteered at the commencement of the Confederate war in 
1861, as a cavalry man, and served throughout the whole campaign 
of four years, and displayed in many a hard- fought battle a prowess 
that would have done honor to a Trojan. He was several times 
wounded with saber cuts, and once shot through the leg. After the 
close of the war he married (his third wife) Miss Falls, of Gas- 
ton county. North Carolina. He now resides in Kutherford county, 
North Carolina, and his post-office is Chimney Rock or Green Hill. 
He, like his father and most of the Whiteside family, is about six 
feet high, and of a strong muscular frame. He is brave and 
fearless even to recklessness. When quite a youth he came in 
contact one night with an armed runaway negro, and attempted to 
capture him. The negro shot at him with a pistol, and he in return 
shot at the negro, but the negro made his escape under cover of 
night. 

F 5. John Taliaferro Whiteside, son of Aaron W. , was born in 
1836, and died in 1864. He was an invalid and was never able to 
walk or talk. 

E 8. Charles C. Lewis, Jr., son of Charles C, Sr. , was born in 
1802. In 1825 he married Jane Flack, daughter of George Flack, 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 28X 

of Rutherford county, North Carolina. George Flack raised but 
three children, \iz. : John, Jane and Andrew. 

Charles C. Lewis, Jr., was about five feet six inches in height, weigh- 
ing about one hundred and thirty-five pounds, with light hair and 
blue eyes. He died in Montgomery county, Texas, in 184G, while 
on a visit to that country. His widow and children are in Yell 
county, Arkansas. He had three children, viz. : 

F 1. George Washington, born in Rutherford county. North 
Oarolina, in 1826. 

F 2. Elizabeth Louisa, born in Rutherford county, North Caro- 
lina, in 1830, and 

F 3. Emily Warner, born in Rutherford county, North Carolina, 
in 1834. 

Jane Flack, his wife, died in Yell county, Arkansas, in 1885. 

F 1. George W., son of Charles C, Jr., was born in 1826. In 
1847 he married Margaret Ann De Berry, in Yell county, Arkansas, 
by whom he had six children, viz. : 

G 1. Cordelia Melissa, born in 1848; married Franklin Waters. 

G 2. Jonathan Winfield, born in 1850; married Amanda Waters, 

G 3. Gerard Chesterfield, born in 1853; married Mary Pruitt. 

G 4. Sterling Menafield, born in 1855, and died 1864. 

G 5. Genela Belona, born in 1857; married William Putnam. 

G 6. Andrew Terrell, born in 1859: married Susan Amanda 
Herring. They have children, viz.: H 1, Minter Terrell; H 2, 
William; H 3, Susan; H 4, Nelly Dorcas, and H 5, Lenty May. 

The wife of George W. Lewis died in 1862, and he married, as 
his second wife. Gillie McCutchen, by whom he had two children, 
viz.: G 7, John Crier, and G 8, Minter Flack, who died. 

George W. was in the Confederate Army and was killed through 
mistake by a Mr. Foster, within five miles of his own home. 

Marvinville, Yell county, Ark., is the post-ofBce of Frank 
W^aters, Jonathan W. Lewis and Gerard C. Lewis; Mountain Fork, 
Polk county. Ark., is the post-office of William Putnam; Rocky 
€omfort, Little River county, Ark. , is the post-office of Andrew T. 
Lewis; Riley, Yell county, Ark., is the post-office of John E. 
Lewis, and of Mrs. Elizabeth Jean. 

F 2. Elizabeth Louise, daughter of Charles C. Lewis, Jr., was 
born in 1830, and married, in Yell county, Arkansas, in 1846, John 
J. Derrick, by whom she had five children, viz. : 

G 1. William Henry, born in 1847. 

G 2. Adam Jackson, born in 1850, and died 1862. 



282 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

G- 3. George Morris, born in 1852; married Martha E. Gatlin,, 
in 1872. 

G 4. Francis Marion, born in 1853. 

G 5. Mary Jane, born in 1855. 

Mr. Derrick died in 1854, after which Elizabeth L., his widow^ 
married Albritton H. Jean, in 1870, and resides near Riley, Yell 
county. Ark. 

F 3. Emily Warner, daughter of Charles C. Lewis, Jr., was 
born in 1834. In 1852 she married William L. Foster, and died 
near Palarm, Pulaski county. Ark. , leaving issue, viz. : 

G 1. Nancy Jane, born in 1853; died in childhood. 

G 2. Mary Elizabeth, born in 1856; married Presley Caldwell; 
post-office, Palarm, Ark. 

G 3. Lewis Columbus, died in childhood. 

William L. Foster died in the Confederate Army, between Corinth 
and Columbus, Miss. Emily W. , his widow, then married Jackson 
Kennesly, and resides near Little Rock, Ark. , and has issue, viz. : 

G 4. Amanda Viola Kennesly. Mrs. Emily W. Kennesly died 
near Palarm, Pulaski county, Ark., in 1880. 

E 9. Nancy Lewis, daughter of Charles, Sr., was born in 1804. 
In 1824 she married Johathan Whiteside, brother of Aaron W., and 
son of John Whiteside and his wife, Eleanor Kelly. They moved 
from Rutherford county, North Carolina, to what was then Benton 
county, Alabama, and settled near the White Plains, where he died 
in 1841. They had only one son: F 1, Oliver Decatur, born in 
1825. He married, first, Sarah Jane Teague, of Benton or Calhoun 
county, Alabama, by whom he had one son, viz. : 

G 1. Jonathan Teague, born in 1847. 

In 1878 he married as his second wife, Mrs. Magdalene S. Frank- 
lin, by whom he had two children, viz. : 

G 2. William M., born in 1879, and 

G 3. Taliaferro T., born in 1880. 

0. D. Whiteside married, as his third wife, Sarah E. King, and 
has children, viz. : 

G 4. Grover Lee, born in 1884. 

G 5. Mary Emma, born in 1886, etc. 

Sarah Jane, his first wife, died in 1877. 

Magdalene S., his second wife, died in 1882. 

G 1. Jonathan Teague, married Nancy Coflfey, and has children,, 
viz.: H 1. Oliver; H 2, Frank; H 3, Maggie; H 4, Pearl, etc. 
He is now (1891) near Hollis, Madison county, Tex. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 283 

After the death of Jonathan Whiteside, Nancy, his widow, mar- 
ried Rev. John Dickey, and now (1891) resides a widow, in Ruther- 
ford county. North Carolina. 

Gr 1. Jonathan Teague, son of Oliver D. Whiteside, married 
Nancy Coffey, and has children, viz. : 

H 1. Oliver D. 

H 2. Frank, married a Miss Coffey. 

H 3. Maggie, married Mr. Fannin. 

H4. Pearl. 

H 5. Talmage. 

E 11. Preston, son of Charles Lewis, Sr., was born in Rutherford 
county. North Carolina, in 1806. He was about five feet seven 
inches in height, weighing about one hundred and forty pounds, 
with black eyes and dark hair. He was a farmer, and a member of 
the Baptist church at Mountain Creek Meeting-house. In 1846 he 
married Martha, daughter of Colonel James Blanton, of Rutherford 
county. He raised eleven children and died in 1880, five miles west 
of Rutherford C. H. The names of his children, marked F, were as 
follows : 

F 1. Jay Whittenton, born in 1847; married Mary C. Bennett. 

F 2. Flavins Adonigah, born in 1849; died single in Kansas. 

F 3. Charles Manoah, born in 1851; married Hattie Andrews. 

F 4. James Taliaferro, born in 1853; married Laura McEntire 
and Hampton. 

F 5. Mary Adora, born in 1855; married Weldon E. Thom. 

F 6. Martha Goode, born in 1857; married William White. 

F 7. Ann Narcissa, born in 1859; married F. F. Haston. 

F 8. Sarah Louisa, born in 1861. 

F 9. Joseph Preston, born in 1864. 

F 10. Lillie Idora, born in 1866; married John Walker. 

F 11. William Edward, born in 1869. 

They are all in Rutherford count5% North Carolina. 

F 1. Jay W., is a very energetic business man. He is Post- 
master at Darlington, Rutherford county, and is engaged in mer- 
chandising, running steam mills, cotton gins, saw mills, shingle 
machines, grist mills, etc. As above mentioned he married, in 1866, 
Mary Catharine Bennett. She was born in 1851, and is a descend- 
ant of the Baxter family. Jay W. is a clerk and deacon of the 
Baptist church at Mountain Creek Meeting-house. His eight chil- 
dren are as follows: 

G 1. Joseph Volney, born in 1869; graduated at Chapel Hill, 



284 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

N. C, June 4, 1891, and is now (1891) at Clinch Port, Va., on the 
United States geological survey. 

G 2. Margaret Henrietta, born in 1871. 

G 3. Martha Catharine, born in 1873; married Adin P. Kucker, 

Thomas Plato, born in 1876; died in 1877. 

John Baxter, born in 1877. 

Ellen Adora, born in 1880. 

Lillie Ann, born in 1882, and 

Mamie Jay, born in 1889. 

Charles Manoah, married Hattie Andrews, of Buncombe 

North Carolina, in 1872. They have five children, 

Martha Florence, born in 1872. 

Samuel Doss, born in 1876. 

Alfred B., born in 1878. 

David Judson, born in 1881, ana 

Cleo, born in 1889. 
F 4. James Taliaferro, born in 1853; married Laura A. McEntire, 
They have five children, viz. : 

Flavius 0., born in 1877. 

Minnie C, born in 1880. 

Ida May, born in 1881. 

Joseph Mc, born in 1883, and 

Mary Josephine, born in 1886. 
After the death of his first wife, James Taliaferro married Nancy 
Hampton. 

F 5. Mary Elizabeth Adora, born in 1855; married Weldon E. 
Thorns, in 1878, and had five children, viz.: 
G 1. Virgil Lewis, born in 1879. 
G 2. Thomas Preston, born in 1880. 
G 3. Pearlie Victoria, born in 1884, and died in 1887. 
G 4. Effle Belle, born in 1887, and 
G 5. Myrtle Deborah, born in 1889. 

F 6. Martha Goode, married William White, in 1885. They 
have five children, viz. : 

G 1. Burlin Lewis, born in 1886. 
G 2. Edgar Pinkney, born in 1887. 
G 3. William Rowland, born in 1889. 
G 4. Leila May, born in 1890. 
G 5. Not named; born in 1891. 



in 1889, 


G4. 


G5. 


G6. 


G7. 


G8. 


F3. 


county. 


viz.: 


Gl. 


G2. 


G3. 


G4. 


G5. 


F4. 


in 1875, 


Gl. 


G2. 


G3. 


G4. 


G5. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 285 

F 7. Nancy Ann Narcissa, born in 1859; married Fortesque 
Haston, in 1884. Has two children, viz. : 

G 1. Freddie Jay, born in 1886, and 

G 2. Annie Belle, born in 1889. 

F 8. Sarah Louisa, born in 1861; married Harrison McEntire, in 
1889. Has one child, viz.: 

G 1. William Jesse, born in 1890. 

F 9. Joseph Preston, born in 186-1. 

F 10. Lillie Idora, born in 1866; married John "Walker, in 1886. 
Has one child, viz. : 

G 1. Romeo Martin, born in 1889. 

F 11. William Edward, born in 1869. 

Preston Lewis and his children are all members of the Baptist 
church, and reside in Rutherford county, North Carolina. 

E 11. Jesse Taliaferro, son of Charles Lewis, Sr. , was born in 
Rutherford county. North Carolina, in 1808. He is a farmer, and 
member of the Baptist church at Mountain Creek Meeting-house. 
He is about five feet seven inches in height, with blue eyes and 
auburn hair. His post-ofBce is Green Hill, Rutherford county, 
N. C. In 1843 he married Susan, daughter of Stephen Cowart, of 
Rutherford county, who died in May, 1886. She had seven chil- 
dren, viz. : 

F 1. Nancy Elizabeth, born in 1844. In 1860 she married Wil- 
liam Jay, son of James Jay, of Rutherford county, North Carolina. 
She died in Newton county, Missouri, and left the following-named 
children: 

G 1. Karl Pulfio Cummins, born in 1S63. 

G 2. Grisef Dreadnaught Xerxes, born in 1865, and died 
1866. 

F 2. Mary E., daughter of Jesse T. Lewis, born in 1846; mar- 
ried Jesse Sorrels. 

F 3. Louisa Jane, born in 1848; married Munroe Lovelace. 

F 4. William Thomas, born in 1850; died single. 

F 5. Richard Taliaferro, born in 1851. 

F 6. James Madison, born in 1853. 

F 7. Laura Elizabeth, born in 1855. 

E 12. William Terrell, the youngest child of Charles C. Lewis, Sr., 
and Elizabeth Russell, his wife, of Rutherford county. North Caro- 
lina, was born in 1811. In 1827 he went to Spartanburg county, 
South Carolina, for the purpose of going to school, where he 
remained until 1835. He made his home at Colonel E. Patterson's, 



286 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

opposite the celebrated Pacolet Mineral Springs, owned then by 
John Poole, eight miles east of Spartanburg C. H., where he taught 
school two years, and then commenced a course of studies under 
Elias C. Leitner, at the Spartanburg Village Academy, which he was 
constrained to abandon on account of ill-health. In 1835 he left 
South Carolina for Alabama, spending one year in Marion, Perry 
county; from there he went to Louisville, Miss., in November, 1836, 
and spent fourteen years in the town, during which time he acted 
as Deputy Sheriff, Deputy Probate Clerk, County Surveyor and as a 
clerk in dry-goods stores, until 1848, when he married Eliza Jane 
Steele, and settled on a farm near Perryville P. 0., eight miles 
southeast of Louisville, in January, 1851, where he has ever since 
resided. 

In 1839 he was elected County Surveyor, and served several 
years, until 1861, when he was elected a member of the State Legisla- 
ture. After serving out his time he retired to private life, until 
1871, when he was appointed Deputy Surveyor by A. J. Shields. 
In November, 1873, he was elected County Surveyor again, and was 
re-elected several times and continued to serve as Surve3'or until 
the expiration of the year 1891. In 1880 he enumerated the census 
■of Supervisor's Beat No. 3, of Winston county; and in 1890 he 
enumerated the census of Beat No. 2. 

His stature is five feet five inches, weighing about one hundred 
and twenty-five pounds, with black hair and hazel eyes. Eliza Jane 
Steele was a daughter of Thomas Steele and his wife, Ann Miller, 
and granddaughter of Thomas Morehead Steele and his wife, Mary 
Barnes, from Ireland. Ann Miller was a daughter of Moses Miller 
and his wife, MoUie Bennett, and granddaughter of Etiene Monier, 
or Stephen Miller, who emigrated from France to America in 1725. 
Thos. M. Steele and Mary Barnes raised four children and died in 
South Carolina. Their children were, viz. : 

1. Margaret, married John Gr. Williams. 

2. Robert, died single. 

3. John, married Sallie Chandler. 

4. Thomas, born about 1780; married Ann Miller; both died in 
Williamsburg, S. C. They had eleven children, viz. : 

1. Mary Ann, born 1808; died in childhood. 

2. Thomas Moses, born 1809; married Sarah Lane, sister of 
John W. 

3. Mary Hannah, born 1811 ; married Henry C. Durant and died 
in Winston county, Mississippi, in 1852. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 287 

-t. Susan Ann, born 1813; married Henry Bailey and died with- 
out issue in South Carolina. 

5. Magdalen Maria, born 1816; married John W. Lane and died 
in Choctaw county, Mississippi, in 1855. 

6. Margaret Isabella, born 1818, and died in 1821. 
. John, born 1821; died 1822. 

8. William Henry, born 1824; married Sarah Catharine Gregg 
and died in Attala county, Mississippi, in 1885. 

9. Dr. John James, born 1826; married Sarah Ann Miller, his 
cousin, daughter of John Miller and Jane Hewett, of South 
Carolina. 

10. Eliza Jane, born 1828; married Wm. T. Lewis, had four 
children and died in Winston county, Mississippi, in 1867. 

11. Stephen M., born 1830; married America Fields and died in 
<^hoctaw county, Mississippi, after the close of the Confederate 
war. 

Eliza Jane Steele was born in Williamsburg District, S. C, in 
1828, where she remained until about the year 1845, when she came 
to Winston county, Mississippi. Her father and her mother both 
having died during her childhood Richard Green became her guardian 
while she remained in South Carolina. After she came to Mississippi 
she chose Dr. R. D. Brown as her guardian, and soon afterward 
■entered the Louisville Female Academy as a student, where she 
remained for several sessions. On the 19th of September, 1848, she 
was married by Rev. Wm. H. Head at the residence of Dr. R. D. 
Brown. In the year of 1856 she made a profession of religion and 
attached herself to the Baptist church and was baptized by Rev. 
Wm. H. Head at Liberty church, in Winston county. Her member- 
ship was removed from there to Louisville, where she continued to 
be a consistent member to the day of her death. On the 17th of 
January, 1867, in the thirty-ninth year of her age, she sank to rest 
calmly, without a struggle or murmur, for — 

Jesus can make the dying bed 

Feel soft as downy pillows are, 
While on his breast she leaned her head 

And breathed her life out sweetly there. 

She left her husband, four children and many relatives and 
friends, to mourn her loss; but their loss, it is to be hoped, was her 
eternal gain. 

Her remains were deposited in the grove near Masonic Hall, in 
Louisville, Miss. , on lot No. 48, where she will rest from her labors 



288 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

until the great day of judgment, when Christ shall come to make up 
His jewels. 

Then will He own her worthy name 

Before her Father's face, 

And in the new Jerusalem 

Appoint her soul a place 

The following epitaph points out the place where she lies: 



IN MEMORY OF 

ELIZA J. STEELE, 

First wife of Wm. T. Lewis, 

Born April 25, 1828, 

Died January 17, 1867, 

Aged thirty-nine years eight months 

and twent3'-two days. 



Her funeral was preached at the Baptist church in Louisville, 
Miss,, on the 5th day of May, 1867, by Rev. Wm. H. Head from the 
following text: 

"Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will 

fear no evil; for Thou art with me; Thy rod and Thy staff comfort me." 

Psalms xxii., 4. 

She is gone and I am lingering 

In this weary world of ours, 
Bearing on my heart the ashes 
Of affection's broken flowers. 
Ever longing to be with her 

In that better world above ; 
When the heart rejoices ever 

In the deathless bonds of love. 
For a moment death divides us. 

But when I have crossed its gloom 
I shall then be resting with her 
Ever, ever more at home. 
[For the Bulletin.] 
MY WIFE. 
When youthful bloom was on her cheek 

And her brow unmarred by care, 
She bid adieu to home and friends 
With me my lonely lot to share. 

We at Hymen's altar plighted 

Our vows of affection ever ; 
Each other we would not forsake 

Until stern death should us sever. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 289 

Hand and hand we moved together 

Along the rugged path of life ; 
Her presence, like the polar star, 

Guided me safely through each strife. 

Amid the low'ring clouds that scowl, 

When no gleam of hope could I see ; 
When anguish wrung my fevered brow 

A solace then she was to me. 

When our earthly hopes were brightest, 

When endeared by affection's tie, 
I could not then believe that she 

In the cold grave so soon would lie. 

Death, with its bleak and icj^ hand. 

Has wrested from me her presence ; 
In keen despair still I languish 

Until time shall summon me hence. 

She is gone to the spirit-land. 

Her cheering smiles no more I'll see ; 
Without which my life is darkness 

And earth's a waste of woe to me. 

"Oh, ever thus from childhood's hour 

I've seen my fondest hopes decay ; 
I never loved a tree or flower 

But 'twas the first to fade away." 

She sleeps now in the sylvan grove, 

Where birds chant their matin songs ; 
She heeds them not — her soul's at rest 

With its God to whom it belongs. 

In early spring the flowers will bloom 

And revive the hopes of many. 
Yet find my heart cold as the clay 

That enwraps my dearest Janie. 
Louisville, Miss., October 1, 1867. Wm. T. Lewis. 

In October, 1867, Wm. T. Lewis made a profession of religion 
and attached himself to the Baptist church at Louisville and was 
baptized by Rev. Wm. M. Farrar. 

He had four children by Eliza Jane Steele, his first wife, \iz. : 

F 1. Overton Taliaferro, born January 1, 1850; has black hair 

and eyes. He is five feet eight inches in height and weighs one 

hundred and fifty pounds. He married, in 1873, Eugenia, daughter 

of Captain Jas. L. Duck, of Meridian, Miss. , and resides near Perry- 

19 



290 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

ville P. 0., Winston county, Miss. He has no children and is a 
farmer and a member of the Methodist-Episcopal church at Rocky 
Hill, in the vicinity of Perryville. 

F 2. Laura lone, born December 31, 1851; had light hair and 
blue eyes, was five feet in stature and weighed one hundred pounds. 
She married, in 1870, Wm. W. Hudson, moved to Newton count}-, 
Missouri, where she died childless in October, 1871. 

F 3. Mary Ella, born May 22, 1857; has dark hair and eyes. 
Her stature is five feet one inch and weighs one hundred pounds. 

F 4. Eliza Jane, born August 4, 1861 ; has light hair and blue 
eyes. Her stature is five feet five inches, weighing one hundred and 
fifteen pounds. 

The following lines were written by William T. Lewis, at the 
request of the Committee of Arrangements, and was sung by a 
lodge of sorrow held at Louisville, Miss., in memory of deceased 
Masons who were soldiers in the late war: 

AIR — BKUCE'S address. 

Noble soldiers ! Whose sad fate, 
We with pain commiserate ; 
Their mem'ries we would consecrate 
In a hallowed urn. 

They were Masons good and true ; 
Each one proved a patriot, too, 
To their homes they bid adieu — 
Never to return. 

When our country was involved, 
Each one stepped forth and resolved. 
Be what might on them devolved, 
The3^'d strike for liberty. 

Gettysburg or Malvern Hill, 
Fredericksburg or Knoxville, 
: Each can testify at will • 

To their chivalry. 

Soldiers who by Lee were led, 
Soldiers who with Johnson bled. 
Now are sleeping with the dead 
Who fought so valiantly. 

Let their names be ever sung. 
In ev'ry land, by ev'ry tongue. 
While the echo we'll prolong 
Throughout eternity. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 291 

No more will war's dread alarms 
Call those patriots to their arms 
Who now sleep from worldly harms 
In their solitude. 

Let the loud-mouth cannon roar, 
Let it sound from shore to shore ; 
They'll sleep 'till time's no more — 
With our gratitude. 

At our lodge no more we'll meet 
Those whom we were wont to greet ; 
Our flag is now their winding sheet 
In a distant land. 

Let the stranger lightly tread 
On the graves of sacred dead, 
Whose glorious deeds a luster shed 
Around our mystic band. 

Fathers ! Mothers ! Who now weep, 
Maidens, who their vigils keep ^ 
O'er the graves where loved ones sleep, 
Vent a sigh of love. 

Their lovely faces we shall see 
In that bright eternity, 
Where we'll meet them joyfully 
In that lodge above. 
XiOuisviLLE, Miss., April 14, 18G6. 

THE SOUTHERN PEOPLE. 

BY WILLIAM T. LEWIS. 
L For the Banner.] 
Long, long did our fathers, brothers and sons 
Fearlessly face death and the enemies' guns ; 
Long, long did thej' strive and contend in the fight 
For what thej^ conceived to be their sacred right. 
Long, long did they suffer from fire and sword, 
While on the plains their blood was freely poured ; 
Long, long were their marches through rain and through sleet ; 
Encrimsoned were their tracks with blood from their feet. 

Thousands were slaughtered upon the battlefield ; 
Thousands in prison died, who refused to yield ; 
Thousands of graves are now unmarked by a stone ; 
Thousands of widows for lost husbands now mourn ; 
Thousands are left now in poverty to roam ; 
Thousands of orphans are left without a home. 
Sighs and tears can never our losses restore, 
Nor revive lost friends we so much dejilore. 



292 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Shall we now forget our'brave and gallant dead, 

And the tears for them we have in anguish shed ? 

Shall we now forget the debt of gratitude 

We owe our heroes for their firm fortitude ? 

Shall we now forget our desolated homes, 

Our smouldering cities, our charred spires and domes ? 

Shall we now forget the weeping widow's wail, 

Or the orphan's cry now heard upon the gale '? 

Never ! No, never while reason holds its sway, 

Will those tragic scenes from our minds fade away ; 

But let them be numbered with the things that were, 

While towards our foes we no malice should bear. 

Let us endeavor our losses to retrieve, 

And over our misfortunes nevermore grieve ; 

Let North, South, East and West, all unite again, 

When peace, harmony and love will ever reign. 

On the 9th of January, 1868, Wm. T. Lewis married as his sec- 
ond wife Miss Mary Ann Brandon Norton, of Winston county, Mis- 
sissippi, daughter of Lemuel M. Norton and Letitia Kennedy, his 
wife. Lemuel M. Norton was a son of Fielder Norton and Nancy 
Murray, of Burke county, North Carolina, and grandson of Nehemiah 
Norton, of Pitsylvania county, Virginia. Letitia Kennedy was a 
daughter of Thomas B. Kennedy and Elizabeth Potter and grand- 
daughter of Wm. Kennedy and Mary Ann Brandon, a sister of Gen- 
eral Thomas Brandon, of Union county. South Carolina, whose name 
may be found in "King's Mountain and its Heroes," by L. C. Draper. 
Wm. Kennedy and General Thos. Brandon were both Kevolutionary 
soldiers. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 293 



CHAPTER XIII. 

D 6. Jesse Pitman Lewis, son of Jolin and his wife, Sarah Talia- 
ferro, of Albemarle county, Virginia, was born in 1763 in Albemarle 
county, about one mile west of Charlottesville. In 1786 he married 
Nancy Clarkson, daughter of Manoah Clarkson, three miles south of 
Charlottesville. Nancy Clarkson was born in 1764. 

Jesse P. Lewis was about six feet in stature, weighing about one 
hundred and eighty pounds, with blue eyes and light hair. He was 
a blacksmith by trade and also a farmer He inherited the home- 
stead of his father, to which he added many acres during his life. 
On the top of a brick house which he^ had erected was a fish-pond 
well-stocked with fish. His house, by some accident, caught fire 
and consumed his fish-pond. This is the first instance that we have 
on record of a fish-pond being burnt up. He served two tours in 
the Revolutionary war, part of his time under Baron Stuben. He 
was in all the principal battles fought in Virginia, Pennsylvania and 
New Jersey and, finally, witnessed the surrender of Lord Cornwallis 
at Yorktown. 

After his death, which occurred on the 8th of March, 1849, the 
following tribute of respect was paid to his memory by the editor of 
the Charlottesville Republican: 

ANOTHER REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIER GONE. 
Died at his residence in Albemarle county, Virginia, on Thursday last, 
March 8, 1849, Mr. Jesse P. Lewis, in the eighty-sixth year of his age. Mr. 
Lewis was born May 13, 1763, and at the age of sixteen entered the Revolu- 
tionary Army in aid of his country's cause and to defend her with his life, 
if necessary, against the insolence and oppression of the mother country. 
Having served out his time of enlistment, he returned home to the quiet 
pursuits of civil life. A requisition for more troops being made, and some 
-of those who were drafted from the militia expressing an unwillingness to 
go, Mr. Lewis stepped forth and volunteered in the place of one of them, 
and in this tour he was present at the ever-memorable siege of Yorktown. 
On the 13th of April, 1786, he was married to Miss Nancy Clarkson, who 
survives him and with whom he lived happily for nearly sixty-three years. 
Their descendants to the fifth generation reside in the county and are 
among our most substantial citizens. It is the good fortune of few to live 
to the age of Mr. L., and fewer still who live to enjoy the confidence, 
respect and esteem of the whole community. 



294 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



A gentleman who had known Mr. L. and his wife for sixty years re- 
marked that he had never heard an individual speak an unkind word of 
either of them. Mr. L. exemplified the true meaning of "Virginia hospi- 
tality ; " the utmost stranger as well as any of his neighbors were received 
and hospitably entertained at his mansion ; the poor were made pfirticipants 
of his bounty, and none were ever sent away empty from his doors ; his 
servants were treated with kindness and humanity, and in all the relations 
of life, as husband, father, master, citizen, neighbor or friend he was 
exemplary and correct. 

Mr. L. was from his earliest youth a zealous Republican, and such he 
continued to the end of life. Mr. Jefferson, on one occasion passing his 
residence, remarked to a friend : " That in such men as Jesse Lewis con- 
sisted a nation's safety." 

He is now gone to reap his reward in another and a better world, as he 
gave good evidence that his peace was made with his Maker, and trusted 
In the merits of a crucified redeemer for salvation. Peace to his ashes! 

Let the rising generation imitate his example, and long will the blessings, 
which he aided in securing to our common country, remain as beacons for 
all mankind. 

His remains were inhumed at tlie old homestead, one mile west 
of the University of Virginia, where he was born, raised and had 
spent his life. 

The place is now owned by one of the Randolph family, where 
his tomb, enclosed with a stone wall, can be found with the following 
inscription upon it: 



UNDERNEATH THIS SLAB REPOSES 
THE BODIES OP 

JESSE LEWIS and of NANCY, his wife. 

He was born on the 13th of May, 1763, and 
died the 8th of March, 1849. 

She was born on the 21st of March, 1764, and 
died the 2d of November, 1849. 

They were married on the 13th of April, 
1786, and lived together sixty-three years in 
uninterrupted harmony, and enjoyed the uni- 
versal respect of all who knew them for their 
integrity and uprightness. 



D 6. Jesse P. Lewis and Nancy Clarkson, his wife, had six chil- 
c[ren — one son, who died in infancy, and five daughters. The fol- 
lowing are the names of his five daughters : 

E 1. Jane, born 1787; married Nelson Barksdale. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 295 

E 2. Mary, born 1788; married Julius Clarkson and John Craven. 

E 3. Elizabeth, born 1791 ; married Reuben Maury. 

E 4. Sophia, born 1795; married Michael Johnson, and 

E 5. Sarah Taliaferro, born 1799; married Major Alexander 
St. C. Heiskell. 

His daughters all lived and died in Albemarle county, Virginia. 

E 1. Jane Lewis, daughter of Jesse, born 1787; married, in 1804, 
Nelson Barksdale and died in 1856 a few miles north of Charlottes- 
ville on the farm that was once owned by David J. Lewis. Nelson 
Barksdale died in 1860. She had ten children, viz. : 

F 1. Mary Jane, born 1804; married Jas. Frank Fry. 

F 2. Nancy Lewis, born 1806, and died 1808. 

F 3. Sarah Taliaferro, born 1808; married John T. Bowcock. 

F 4. Sophia Lewis, born 1810, married James Frey. 

F 5. John Taliaferro, born 1813; died a bachelor in Albemarle 
county. 

F 6. Eliza M. , born 1815; married Albert Terrell and Rob. 
Durrett. 

F 7. Caroline C, born 1819; married Thomas J. D. Eddins. 

F 8. Jesse Lewis, born 1824, and died 1825, ] , . 

F 9. Maria, born 1824, and died 1826, j 

F 10. Margaret C, born 1827; married Dr. Henry 0. Austin. 

Albert Terrell died in 1849. 

The following tribute of respect to the memory of John T. 
Barksdale, was published in a Charlottesville paper April 11, 1879: 

John T. Barksdale, long and favorably known in our community and 
county, departed this life on the morning of the 8th inst. in the sixty-seventh 
year of his age. It was his province to fill within the last half century many 
and varied positions and functions of public and private confidence and trust, 
and he has closed his days on earth without a suspicion of his failure in any 
respect to do his duty in them all to the utmost of his opportunities and 
ability. He was the son of Nelson Barksdale and the grandson of Jesse 
Lewis, and from them inherited a large share of the manly virtues which 
adorned and dignified their most useful and honored lives. Faithful in the 
discharge of all obligations, whether voluntarily assumed or providentially 
devolved upon him, fidelity was the rigid and uncompromising rule of his 
life. General and liberal benefactions to the utmost of his means were the 
delight of his days; courteous, civil and conciliatory in all his daily inter- 
course with his fellow-men. He made no enemies, and many friends ; free 
and open in his hospitality to the worthy and true. He was seriously af- 
fected when increasing infirmities of age and disease rendered it proper that 
he should exchange his commodious home for one of more modest preten- 
sions. Among his virtues conspicuous Avas his respect and reverence for Intel- 



296 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

ligence, merit and moral character. And it may be truly said of him that 

be was an honest and truthful man, and a sincere, firm and faithful friend. 

Chaklottesville, Va., April 11, 1879. X. 

F 1. Mary Jane, daughter of Nelson Barksdale, married in 1822, 
James Francis Fry; raised seven children, and died near Charlottes- 
ville in 1850. He died in 1880. Mr. Fry was an active busi- 
ness man. He was Sheriff of Albemarle county for four years; 
took the census of the county in 1840; assessed the lands in 1856, 
and is now (1864), and has been for the last twelve years, Commis- 
sioner of the Revenue for one-half of Albemarle county. The 
names of their seven children are, viz. : 

Gr 1. Thomas Wesley, born in 1823, married Sarah Jane Mc- 
Laurin, of Powhattan county, Virginia, and died in 1849. He acted 
as Deputy Sheriff of Albemarle county. He left two children, viz. : 

H 1. Edward James, born in 1846, and 

H 2. Clara Thomas born in 1849; married Frank Starr. 

After the death of Thomas W. Fry, his widow moved to Sabine 
City, Tex., where she married George W. Clapp, a merchant of that 
city, but is now a widow, and lives in Marshall, Tex. , with her son, 
Edwin, who is a prominent banker of that place. 

Gr 2. Matthew Henry Fry, son of J. Frank, born in 1824; mar- 
ried Sarah Taliaferro Heiskell, daughter of Alexander St. C. Heis- 
kell, a relative; settled in Prince George county, Maryland., on a 
farm, where he died, leaving no children. 

G 3. Mildred Jane Fry, daughter of James Frank, was born in 
1825; married James S. Barksdale, son of Rice G., a farmer, who has 
been engaged in the sheriffalty for twelve or thirteen years in Albe- 
naarle county. They have children, viz. : 

H 1. Mary Elizabeth, born in 1852. 

H 2. Frank Nelson, born in 1855. 

H 3. Sarah Lewis, born in 1858. 

;H 4. Mildred Fry, born in 1860. 

H 5. James Rice, born in 1864. 

G 4. John Nelson, son of James Frank Fry, born in 1828; mar- 
ried Elizabeth Goodman, daughter of Rowland Goodman, of Han- 
over county, Virginia. He is a farmer ; post-office, Charlottesville, Va. 

G 5. Jesse Lewis, son of James Frank Fry, born in 1829; mar- 
ried Frances Dunkum; is a farmer near Charlottesville, Va. He 
served twelve months in the Confederate Army, after which he was 
elected Justice of the Peace. The names of their children, are: 

H 1. William Dunkum, born in 1857. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



297 



H 2. Frank Barksdale, born in 1859. 

H 3. Jesse Lewis, born in 1861, and 

H 4. John Thomas, born in 1863. 

G 6. Ann Elizabeth, daughter of James Francis Fry, born in 
1831; married James D. Goodman, a merchant of Charlottesville. 
They have one child: 

H 1. Mary Mildred, born in 1858, and married in 1887, James 
W. Garnett, of Culpeper county, Virginia. 

G 7. Mary Catharine, daughter of James Francis Fry, born in 
1837; married John L. Jarman, and lives one mile north of Char- 
lottesville. Mr. Jarman is Deputy Sheriff of Albemarle county. 
They have children as follows: 

H 1. Frank Dabney, liorn in 1861. 

H 2. John Thomas, born in 1864, etc. 

F 2. Nancy Lewis Barksdale, daughter of Nelson, born in 1806, 
and died in 1808; was buried in the graveyard of Jesse P. Lewis, 
her grandfather, one mile west of the University of Virginia. The 
following is the epitaph on her tombstone: 



IN MEMORY OF 

NANCY L. BARKSDALE, 

Born July 31st, 1806, and 

Died June 5th, 1808. 

Dear are earthly caskets 
Thy rich jewels flown, 

And shine in glory 
At Jehovah's throne. 



F 3. Sarah Taliaferro Barksdale, daughter of Nelson, born in 
1808; married Colonel John J. Bowcock, in 1836. Colonel Bow- 
cock is a very energetic business man. He is a farmer and mer- 
chant, and has been several times a member of the Legislature. 
He is now (1864), and has been for many years, the presiding 
Justice of the county. His post-office is Charlottesville, Va. The 
following are the names of Sarah T. and Colonel Bowcock' s 
children. 

G 1. William Henry, born in 1827; married Letitia S. Temple- 
man, of the city of Richmond, Va. William Henry is engaged in the 
commission business in the city of Richmond. They have children 
as follows: H 1, Bessie Bell, born 1854; H 2, Lillie, born 1856; 



298 GEiNEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

H 3, May Willie, born 1858; H 4, Anna Virginia, born 1859, and 
H 5, Sarah Mildred, born 1860. 

G 2. Dr. James Matthew Bowcock, son of Colonel John J., was. 
born in 1829; married Ann Baker, of Morgan county, Virginia. 
They reside in Clarksburg, Harrison county, Va. , and have children 
as follows: H 1, Ida, born 1853; H 2, Willie M., born 1855; H 3, 
Charles W., born 1857, etc. 

G 3. Jane Mildred, daughter of Colonel John J. Bowcock, was 
born in 1830, and married James H. Burnley. Mr. Burnley is a 
farmer. His post-ofBce is Charlottesville. Their children are: H 1, 
John Seth, born 1852; H 2, Ann Lewis, born 1854; H 3, Jane 
Barksdale, born 1856; H 4, Lucy C, born 1858; H 5, Lizzie Over- 
ton, born 1860, etc. 

Gr 4. Dr. Charles S. Bowcock, son of Colonel John J. , born in 
1832; married Maggie M. Branch, of Goochland county, Virginia. 
His post-ofBce is Kesnick, Albemarle county, Va. They have chil- 
dren, viz. : HI, Branch, born 1862, etc. 

G 5. Jesse Lewis Bowcock, son of Colonel John J. , was born in 
1835, and married Maggie S. Reppeto, of Rockingham county, Vir- 
ginia. He is a farmer. His post-office is McGaheysville, Eocking- 
ham county, Va. The names of their children, are: H 1, Ann 
Edgar, born 1860; H 2, Stewart, born 1862, etc. 

G 6. Eliza Catharine Bowcock, daughter of Colonel John J., 
was born in 1838, and died in 1844. 

G 7. John Overton Bowcock, son of Colonel John J., born in 
1844. 

G 8. Sarah Ann Bowcock, daughter of Colonel John J., born 
in 1847. 

F 4. Sophia Lewis Barksdale, daughter of Nelson, born in 1810; 
married James Frey, and died childless in Albemarle county, Vir- 
ginia, in 1852. He died in 1849. He was a farmer, and owned 
large manufacturing mills. 

F 5. John T. Barksdale, born in 1813; was a bachelor, and 
resided in Albemarle county, Virginia. ( See his obituary notice on 
another page.) 

F 6. Eliza M. Barksdale, born in 1815; married in 1827, Albert 
C. Terrell, son of Joel Terrell, of Albemarle county, Virginia. 
Albert C. Terrell died in 1849, leaving seven children, viz. : 

G 1. Jane Lewis, born in 1836, and died in 1859. 

G 2. John Albert, born in 1838; killed at the battle of Win- 
chester, Va., in 1863. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 29& 

G 3. George William, born in 1840; wounded in the leg at 
Chancellorsville. 

G 4. James C, born in 1843; taken prisoner at Brandy 
Station. 

G5. Sallie E., born in 1848. 

G 6. Maggie, born in 1850. 

After the death of Albert C. Terrell, she married Robert Durrett, 
from Tennessee, and resides in Albemarle county. By her second 
husband, Mr. Durrett, she has two children, viz.: 

G 7. Maud, born in 1857, and Eliza Maury, born in 1859. 

F 7. Caroline C. Barksdale, daughter of Nelson, born in 1819; 
married Thomas J. D. Eddins, in 1839, of Green county, Virginia. 
She had seven children, and died in 1855, in Green county, Virginia. 

Mr. Eddins for several years held the office of Commissioner of 
the Revenue; is a farmer, residing near Stanardsville, Green county, 
Va. The names of his children by Caroline C. are: 

G 1. John Thomas, born in 1841; died in the army in 1862. 

G 2. Jane Lewis, born in 1843. 

G 3. James S., born in 1844. 

G 4. William Lewis, born in 1846. 

G 5. Davis R., born in 1848. 

G 6. Mary Lewis, born in 1852. 

G 7. Caroline Barksdale, born in 1855. 

Mr. Eddins, since the death of his wife, married a Miss Early, of 
Green county, as his second wife. 

F 8 and 9 (twins), Jesse Lewis and Maria Barksdale, born 1824. 
He died in 1825 and she in 1826. 

F 10, Margaret C. Barksdale, daughter of Nelson, born 1827; 
married, in 1852, Dr. Henry 0. Austin and resides six miles north 
of Charlottesville, Va. They have children as follows: G 1, Sarah 
Jane, born 1853; G 2, Henry 0., born 1859, and died 1862; G 3, 
Jesse Lewis, born 1862, and died 1864. 

E 2. Mary Lewis, daughter of Jesse P., born 1788; was twice 
married; first to Julius Clarkson, in 1805, by whom she had one 
daughter, F 1, Elizabeth A., born 1806, who married Thos. W. 
Maury, brother of Reuben Maury, and died childless in 1833. 
After the death of Julius Clarkson, Mary, his widow, married as her 
second husband, John Craven, by whom she had no children. Mr. 
Craven died in 1845 and she in 1852 near Charlottesville, Va. They 
were very pious members of the Episcopal church at Charlottes- 
ville, Va. Mrs. Mary Craven and her daughter were both buried in 



300 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

the graveyard of Jesse P. Lewis, where the following inscriptions 
can be found on their tombstones: 



ERECTED TO THE MEMORY OF 

Mother and Daughter. 



MRS. MARY CRAVEN, 

Born July 21, 1788 ; 

Died December 16, 1853. 

Sleep on, sweet angel, till the day star dawns. 
Thy dreams are ended and thy sorrows o'er. 

* * * 

ELIZABETH A. MAURY, 

Wife of Thomas W. Maury, 

Born March 13, 1806 ; 

Died September 14, 1833. 

Take, holy earth, 

All that my soul holds dear. 



IN MEMORY OF 

THOS. W. MAURY, 

Who departed this life February 10, 1842, 

Aged sixty-two years. 



E 3. Elizabeth, daughter of Jesse P. Lewis, was born in 1791 ; 
married Reuben Maury, resided near Charlottesville, Va., where she 
died in 1863 and he in 1868. She was a zealous member of the 
Baptist church ; lived and died like a Christian ; loved and esteemed 
by all who knew her. They raised only one son, viz. : 

F 1. Jesse Lewis, who married Lucy Price, of Fauquier county, 
Virginia, and resides at his father' s old homestead, ' ' Piedmont, ' ' 
near the University of Virginia. 

Issue of Jesse L. Maury and Lucy Price, viz. : 

Gr 1. Nannie Jessie, married Matthew Fontaine Maury, son of 
William Maury, of Liverpool, England. 

G- 2. Reuben. 

G 3. Elizabeth Lewis, married Dr. R. H. Lemmon, of Campbell 
county, Virginia. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 301 

Gr 4. Stephen Price, is a ship engineer in the English service. 

G 5 Charles Harper, died young. 

G 6. Lucy Jessie, died young. 

G 7. Matthew Fontaine, married Eliza Fry, daughter of Eev. 
Matthew Fontaine Maury, of Kentucky. They live near Piedmont, 
in Albemarle county, Va. 

G 8. Jane Lewis, married Albert Maverick, of San Antonio, Tex. 

G 9. Ellen McGregor. 

G 10. Sallie Fontaine, died young. 

G 11. Robert. 

Reuben Maury was a near relative of the distinguished Matthew 
Fontaine Maury, whose fame as a scientist was world-wide. 

E 4. Sophia Lewis, daughter of Jesse P., was born in 1795. 
She had dark hair and blue eyes. She married, in 1816, Colonel 
Michael Johnson, son of Benjamin Johnson, of Henrico county, Vir- 
ginia. She had five children and died near Charlottesville in 1863, 
and her husband in 1864. She was a very kind-hearted, hospitable 
woman, an humble Christian and a member of the Baptist church. 

The following are the names of her children and some of her 
grandchildren : 

F 1. Benjamin Johnson, son of Michael, was born in 1817; 
married Mary E. Moore, of North Garden, in Albemarle county, 
where he died in 1857, leaving five children, viz. : G 1, Sallie; G 2, 
Lewis; G 3, MoUie, G 4, Fannie, and G 5, Martha. 

F 2. James Richard Johnson, son of Michael, was born 1819; 
he married Martha E. Yancy, of Illinois, and settled as a farmer 
near Cambridge, in Saline county, Mo. , where his wife died, leaving 
four children, viz. : G 1, Susan Ann, born 1841; G 2, Sophia Lewis, 
born 1844; G 3, Mary S. ; G 4, Robert Michael. His second wife 
was a Miss Pigg- Lie resides in Bates county, Missouri. 

F 3. Thomas Alexander, son of Michael Johnson, born 1822; 
married Matilda T. Nelson, of Fauquier county, Virginia. He died 
near Charlottesville, Va., 1871, leaving three children, viz.: G 1, 
Elizabeth Lewis, born 1843, married Ray Phillips, of West Virginia, 
and G 2, Mollie N., born 1847, who makes her home with her aunt, 
Mollie Bruce, of Staunton, Va. 

F 4. Jesse Lewis Johnson, son of Colonel Michael, born 1825; 
married Margaret Evans Atlee, of Richmond, Va. , and settled as a 
farmer on James river, six miles below the city of Richmond. The 
names of his children are: G 1, Mary Evans, born 1855; G 2, Atlee, 
born 1857, etc. 



302 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



F 5. Mary Ann Johnson, daughter of Colonel Michael, was born 
in 1832. She is a noble, generous-hearted, self-sacrificing, patriotic 
woman. During the Confederate war she spent her time at the 
hospital in Charlottesville waiting on the sick and wounded soldiers. 
She is kindly and gratefully remembered by Southern soldiers, and 
only spoken of in the most exalted terms of commendation and praise 
by those who were so unfortunate as to be confined in the hospital at 
Charlottesville. Untiringly, like a ministering angel, did she attend 
to and supply their daily wants, while her own home and interest 
were entirely neglected for that of the soldiers. It was to her kind 
oflSce and ministering care that many a poor soldier was rescued 
from a premature grave and enabled to return to his home. Nor 
were the recipients of her kind favors unmindful of her generosity; 
for with a bountiful hand did many a soldier, his mother or sisters 
bestow upon her their largesses as a manifestation of their gratitude 
and as a memento of their kindest regards and friendship. 

F 5. Mary A. Johnson, married a Mr. A. M. Bruce and resides 
in Staunton, Augusta county, Va. 

E 5. Sarah Taliaferro Lewis, daughter of Jesse P., was born 
1800, and married Major Alexander St. C. Heiskell, had five children 
and died in Albemarle county in 1831. Her relic was inhumed in 
the graveyard at her father's mansion-house. The following is a 
copy of the epitaph on her monument: 



IN MEMORY OF 

SARAH TALIAFERRO, 
"Wife of Alexander St. C. Heiskell and 

daughter of Jesse and Nanc3\Lewis, 

Born December 16, 1800, and departed 

this life July 30, 1831. 

Having done her duty as a child, a 

mother and a wife, she was beloved in 

life ; in death lamented. 



Some years after the death of his wife Major Heiskell returned 
to Maryland, married his second wife, by whom he had two or three 
children, and died there in 1851. 

The following are the names of his children by his first wife, Sarah 
Taliaferro Lewis, viz. : 

F 1. Jesse Lewis Heiskell, was, at different times, a stage con- 
tractor, merchant, farmer, etc. He married Elonora Martin, resid- 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 303 

ing some four or five miles west of Charlottesville, Va, From this 
union there was no offspring. He left Charlottesville and settled on 
a farm in what is known as ' ' South Garden, ' ' in Albemarle county. 
His post-office was "Cross Roads." 

Jesse L. Heiskell was one of the finest-looking men in Albe- 
marle county. He was about five feet eight inches in stature, weigh- 
ing about one hundred and sixty pounds, with ruddy complexion, 
dark hair and blue e3^es. In his manners he was complaisant, cour- 
teous and conciliating, with a nobleness of soul, elevated senti- 
ments, liberal and magnanimous. 

We copy from the Blue Ridge Herald, of July 26, 1861 — a paper 
published at Walhalla, S. C. — which speaks for itself : 

PLEASING INCIDENT. 

We find the subjoined in the Charlottesville Review, and agree with our 
contemporary that such instances of generous regard for the defenders of 
our soil ought not to pass unnoticed. Says the Review: 

A circumstance connected with the recent passage of the Lj^nchburg 
and Bedford troops through this country is so honorable to one of our citi- 
zens that it deserves a public notice. 

The night before reaching Charlottesville, the squadron arrived about 
dark, at the place which had been selected for their encampment. They 
found that the choice had been singularly unfortunate. The inequalities 
of the surface did not allow them to raise their tents — no food nor forage 
had been provided, and a heavy rain was falling. Jaded and disheartened, 
the officers and men threw themselves on the ground, and lying all night 
in the mud and rain, prepared at day-break to resume their march. As 
they were in the act of moving forward, Mr. Jesse Lewis Heiskell rode up 
and stating that he lived near the road some miles ahead, invited them to 
stop and take breakfast at his house. Having had nothing to eat since 
noon the previous day, thej' gladly consented, and the reception they met 
with ma}' best be given in the words of an officer who related it. 

"A few minutes after we arrived at Mr. Heiskell's residence breakfast was 
announced, and I was directed by the Commander to carry the men to the 
table in successive squads of thirty-five. It would be doing great injustice 
to the entertainment if I contented m3'self with saying that it was a suffi- 
cient, or even a comfortable, meal. It was a bountiful feast — the abund- 
ance, variety and excellence of the fare left nothing literally to be desired. 
If, after ample time for preparation, a select party of friends had partaken 
of Mr. Heiskell's hospitalit}', it would not have been possible either to 
have furnished them a finer breakfast, to serve it in a neater stj'le, or to 
dispense the honors with greater courtesy and cordialitj-. Guess my amaze- 
ment when I found that this was repeated with each detachment. Nothing 
fell short — but in every particular, coffee, tea, cream, milk, fresh butter, 
different kinds of bread, meat, preserves — the last squad fared as well as 
the first. 



304 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

"While thus entertaining one hundred and sixty-five men he fed all our 
horses — one hundred and eighty in number, and made us load our wagon 
with provender for them to eat at noon. 

" Mr. Helslvell's kindness would have been gratefully received undor 
any circumstances, and his munificent generosity properly appreciated. 
But no one can tell how acceptable it was nor how thankful we felt, unless 
he had shared our experience — had slept supperless in the rain — and thcn» 
hungry, wet and stiffened, resumed his march." 

All honor to Mr. Heiskell ! 

Jesse L. Heiskell died in Albemarle county, Virginia, without 
issue, in 1876. 

F 2. Susan Ann Heiskell, daughter of Alex. St. Clair, married 
George Craven, son of John Craven, by his first wife. She died on 
the Rivanna river, near Charlottesville, Va., in 1867, her husband 
having died in 1852, leaving four children, viz. : 

G 1. Peter Henry, was killed in 1873, while engaged in blasting 
on the Chesapeake & Ohio R. R. 

G 2. Jesse Lewis, post-office, Staunton, Va. 

G 3. William. 

G 4. James, was drowned in Texas. 

F 3. Dr. Peter Henry Heiskell, son of Major Alexander St. 
Clair, graduated in March, 1849, in the Jefferson Medical School at 
Philadelphia; located at Charlottesville, where he successfully en- 
gaged in the practice of medicine a few years, when he married 
Hester S. A. Hill, his cousin, in Prince George county, Maryland, 
where he afterward settled on a farm. His post-office is Oxen 
Hill, Prince George county, Md. Their children are, viz. : 

G 1. Sarah Lewis, born 1847; G 2, Mary Josephine, born 1849; 
G 3, Mary Hester, born 1852; G 4, Emma Eleanora, born 1854; 
G 5, Peter Henry, born 1856; G 6, Mary Ann Lewis, born 1858, 
and G 7, James Alexander, born 1860. 

F 4. James Heiskell, son of Major Alexander St. C, died single 
in 1857. 

F 5. Sarah Taliaferro Heiskell, daughter of Alexander St. C, 
married Matthew H. Fry, son of James Frank Fry, a cousin. He 
was a farmer, and did reside near Washington City, in Prince 
George county, Md. They have no progeny. He is dead, and his 
widow is with Jesse L. Maury, near Charlottesville, Va. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 305 



OHAPTEE XIY. 

COLONEL RICHARD LEWIS. 

' D 7. Colonel Richard Lewis, son of John and his wife, Sarah 
Taliaferro, was born in 1765, in Albemarle county, Virginia. He 
was upward of six feet high, with light hair, blue eyes and fair 
complexion. He emigrated to Rutherford county. North Carolina, 
with his father before the Revolutionary war, and was a saddler by 
trade. After the close of the Revolutionary war there were but 
four offices within the gift of the people of the county; three of 
those offices were conferred upon three of the Lewis brothers, 
viz.: Major John Lewis was elected Sheriff of the county; 
Charles Lewis was elected as Representative of the county in the 
State Legislature, and Colonel Richard Lewis was elected Clerk of 
the County Court. He was a member of the convention that revised 
the Constitution of North Carolina. He married Sarah Miller, 
daughter of General James Miller and his wife, Agnes Miller, in 
1789. General Miller and his wife were cousins. They emigrated 
from Ireland to the United States. He was an officer in the Revo- 
lutionary war, and commanded at the siege of Augusta, Ga. , as 
Captain or Colonel, and after the war he represented Rutherford 
county. North Carolina, as Senator in the State Legislature in 1782, 
1784, 1785 and 1787. ( See Wheeler's History of North Carolina.) 

General Miller raised only two daughters: Sarah, married Col- 
onel Richard Lewis, and the other married James Erwin, of Ruth- 
erford county. North Carolina. Richard Lewis and his wife were 
members of the Methodist-Episcopal church. They finally moved 
from Rutherford county. North Carolina, and settled near Pendle- 
ton, S. C, on Seneca river, where he died in 1831, and she a few 
years afterward. Their remains were interred at the Stone church 
( Hopewell ), near Pendleton, S. C. 

Colonel Richard Lewis and his wife, Sarah Miller, had nine chil- 
dren, viz. : 

E 1. Mary Mansfield, married Hon. John McDowell, in 1810. 

E 2. Lindamira, died single in 1838. 

E 3. James Overton, married Mary Lawton, in 1822. 

E 4. Nancy Elvira, married Joseph Van Shanklin, in 1820. 
29 



306 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

E 5. Richard Marius, died single. 

E 6. John Earle, died single. 

E 7. Sarah Ann, married Edwin Reese, in 1834. 

E 8. Eliza Love, died single, and 

E 9. Andrew Fielding, married Susan Sloan, in 1840. 

E 1. Mary Mansfield, born in 1790, in Rutherford countj^. North 
Carolina. She was the first graduate from the Salem Academy, For- 
sythe county. North Carolina. Her father sent to London, England, 
for a piano, and sent it to Salem for her especial benefit — it being the 
first piano in this part of the State. She was afterward educated in 
Raleigh, N. C, and became quite an accomplished lady; was mod- 
est and unassuming; was a true patriot, and when the War of 1861 
came on she worked early and late making clothes for the soldiers. 
She was a member of the Methodist church. She died of heart 
disease in 1872, honored and beloved by all who knew her. 

She married Hon. John McDowell, of Pleasant Garden, McDowell 
county, N. C. He was born in 1785, and was a son of General 
Joseph McDowell, one of the heroes of King's Mountain, and 
grandson of John McDowell. 

Joseph McDowell and his wife, Margaret O'Neal, emigrated from 
Ireland and settled in Winchester, Va., and afterward removed to 
Burke county. North Carolina. 

The McDowells were men of ability, and distinguished officers of 
the Revolutionary war. Charles and Joseph were oflBcers at the 
battle of King's Mountain, where Ferguson was killed and his army 
captured. 

Hon. John McDowell represented Rutherford county. North 
Carolina in the House of Commons in the State Legislature, in 
1820 and 1821. He resided on the north side of Broad river, above 
Island Ford, in the southern part of Rutherford county. North 
Carolina, where he died in 1855. They had eleven children, viz. : 

F 1. Dr. Joseph McDowell, born in 1812; graduated in medicine 
and was appointed surgeon of the troops sent to remove the Indians 
from North Carolina and Georgia. He married Louisa Twitty, of 
Rutherfordton, N. C, and moved to Georgia. They had eight chil- 
dren, viz. : 

G 1, and G 2, James Albert and Livingston, died young. 

G 3. Adelia Jane; G 4, John Lewis; G 5, Josephine, died young; 
G 6, William ; G 7, Margaret, married Rev. Jesse Siler, a Presby- 
terian minister, and lives in Shelby, N. C. They have one son: HI, 
Arnold Miller, lives in Augusta. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 307 

F 2, and F 3, Sarah and Richard, son and daughter of John 
McDowell, died young. 

F 4. Mary Ann McDowell, was born in Rutherford county, 
North Carolina, in 1819; was educated at Salem Academy, in For- 
sythe county, North Carolina. She married Rev. William Asberry 
Oamewell, a Methodist minister of South Carolina Conference. They 
raised six children, viz. : 

Gr 1. Sarah Ann, born in 1841; married Dr. Daniel De Saussure, 
of Camden, S. C. , where they now reside. They had four children, 
viz. : HI, Daniel; H 2, Mary M., died; H 3, Sallie, married Wil- 
liam Parish, and H 4, Fannie Martin. 

G 2. Mary W. Gamewell, is a school-teacher. 

G 3. Joseph McD. Gamewell, was a Confederate soldier, and is 
now in New Jersey. He married his cousin, Abbie Gamewell. They 
have three children, viz.: H 1, John Asberry; H 2, Mary Ann, and 
H 3, Minnie. 

G 4. Martha E. B. Gamewell, is a teacher in Con vers College, 
Spartanburg, S. C. 

G 5. Joseph A. Gamewell, was a Confederate soldier. He grad- 
uated at Wafford College, Spartanburg, S. C, where he is now 
(1891) Professor of Languages. He married his cousin, Julia 
McDowell, and has two children, viz.: H 1, Joseph McD., and 
H 2, Mary Lily. (There is an error as to the two Josephs.) 

G 6. Susan A. Gamewell, lost her eyesight from measles. 

Rev. Wm. Asberry Gamewell was a very able and practicable 
preacher, and was much beloved by all who knew him. He died in 
Spartanburg county. South Carolina, in 1869, when the following 
obituary notice appeared in the Carolina Spartan : 

REV. W. A. GAMEWELL. 

About thirty-five years ago this pure and useful minister of God began 
the labors of the itinerancy in the Methodist church, on the Spartanburg 
circuit. At about 3 o'clock p. m. of the 30th ult., his work was finished and 
*'he rests from his labors." His funeral was preached the next day by 
Rev. W. Smith, D. D., in the Methodist church. The seats of the church 
were filled to their utmost capacity and the galleries were crowded by the 
colored friends of the deceased, indicating the universal esteem in which 
he was held by the entire community. 

We have never known a man whose loss will be so universally deplored 
by all who knew him, both saints and sinners. He possessed to a degree, 
which we have never observed in any other person, that innate qualitj' of 
attractiveness which compelled the respect and captivated the affection of 
everybody with whom he came in contact. We have heard men, who 



308 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

seemed to hold in derision and contempt tlie religion he professed and so 
beautifully exemplified in all his life and conversation, speak of him in 
terms of the highest respect, and even affection. And yet he was faithful 
in reproving sinners and bold in the denunciation of all manner of wicked- 
ness. Intellectually, he did not rank as high as some of his compeers in 
the ministry. He had cultivated none of the mere accomjdishmenis of pulpit 
oratory — made no sort of effort at display ; but he was blessed with a large 
share of strong common sense, a sound judgment, a clear, logical mind, and, 
above all, a fervent spirit. The secret of his wonderful power and influence 
in the pulpit and out of it, we think, is this : he was always in earnest. 
Entirely forgetting himself, his mind, soul and body were unreservedly 
devoted to the great work he had undertaken. And yet with all his zeal he 
was very free from the excesses of enthusiasm. We have seen him in the 
midst of the highest religious excitement, when his whole being seemed 
aglow with holy joy, and yet we have never known him to do or saj' any- 
thing which the severest critic could pronounce an impropriety. He was 
an indefatigable laborer. He seemed to have no time for anything outside 
the duties of his high vocation. And never did he cease to labor until 
disease had so far completed its fearful work as to produce complete physi- 
cal prostration. His body now rests in our village graveyard— his spirit is 
reveling in the full fruition of the joy it had so long anticipated by faith, 
and to us is left the light of his example and the treasure of his memory. 
The world has lost one of its purest characters ; the State one of its most 
useful citizens; Christianity one of its brightest ornaments, and the church 
one of its- most efficient and beloved ministers. 

Spartanburg, S. C, Thursday, November 4, 1869. 

F 5. Dr. Jas. Overton McDowell, son of Mary and John, was 
born in 1822. He graduated in medicine and located at Auburn, 
Ala., where he married Mariah Wynn, by whom he had four children, 
viz.: G 1 and G 2, died young; G 3, Thomas A., resides at Fort 
Worth, Tex., and is a commercial traveler; G 4, Augustus G., is 
married and doing business in Dallas, Tex. After the death of 
Mariah, his first wife, he married Jacquilin Wynn, a sister of his 
Qrst wife. 

F 6. Nancy, daughter of Mary and John McDowell, born 1824; 
lied unmarried in 1885. 

F 7 and F 8. Myra E. L. and her twin sister, Martha Moflfett,, 
were born in 1827. 

F 7. Myra E. L., married, in 1850, Colonel Champion T. N. 
Davis, a lawyer by profession. He was a Colonel of the 16th Eegi- 
ment of North Carolina troops during the Confederate war, and was 
killed at the battle of Seven Pines. Myra E. L. , his wife, died in 
1853, leaving only one daughter, viz. : G 1, Mary Susan, who married 
Jas. A. Torney, a lawyer of Rutherford county, North Carolina. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 309 

They have six children, viz. : H 1, Albert C. ; H 2, Lewis B. ; H 3, 
l^rances J. ; H 4, Mary M. ; H 5, Myra E. , and H 6, James A. 

F 8. Martha Moffett, daughter of Dr. J. 0. McDowell, married 
Dr. Geo. W. Michal in 1860. They have two children, viz. : G 1, 
Mary M., and G 2, John McD., who married Mary Lenoir, a grand- 
daughter of General Wm. Lenoir, in 1889. They had one son, viz. : 
H 1, Thomas, whose post-offlce is Hickory, Catawba county, N. C. 

F 9. John Lewis McDowell, was born in 1829; was a farmer and 
lived at his father's old homestead. He was a Colonel of the 34th 
North Carolina Regiment during the Confederate war. His hat, coat 
and canteen were shot through by the enemies' bullets, yet he escaped 
imhurt. He married Sophia Kelly, of South Carolina, by whom he 
had five children, viz.: G 1, Augustus S., is in Dallas, Tex.; G 2, 
Frances E. ; G 3, Wm. K. ; G 4, John H., and G 5, Elizabeth S. 
John Lewis McDowell died in 1890 and his wife in 1889 in Ruther- 
ford county, North Carolina. 

F 10. Sarah Taliaferro McDowell, was born in 1833, and resides, 
unmarried, in Rutherford county. North Carolina. 

E 2. Lindamira Lewis, daughter of Colonel Richard, was born 
about 1795, and died single near Pendleton Village, S. C, about the 
year 1838. She was a very pious and exemplary member of the 
Episcopal church. Several days before her death she lay in a state 
of insensibility or trance. At length she recovered from her apathetic 
stupor in which she had lain, and conversed freely with her friends 
and relatives. She informed them that she had visited both hell and 
heaven, and portrayed to them the transcendent beauties of the 
ethereal world and the honors of the infernal regions. She turned 
to her brother John and remarked that ' ' she was about to leave this 
world and for him to prepare himself to meet his God, that he would 
soon follow her, ' ' and expired after giving indubitable evidence of 
her bright hope of her consummate bliss beyond the grave. Her 
brother John survived her only a few months. 

E 3. James Overton Lewis, son of Colonel Richard, was born 
about 1797; married Mary Lawton, a very amiable and worthy lady 
of Pendleton Village, S. C. J. 0. Lewis represented his county in 
the State Legislature, and died finally near Walhalla, Oconee 
county, S. C, in 1872. He raised eleven children, viz.: 

F 1. Sarah, married Dr. Wm. B. Cherry, of Athens, Ga., and 
has children, viz. : G 1, Mary Lorton, born 1851; G 2, Samuel, born 
1854; G 3, Fannie Lewis, born 1856, etc. 

E 4. Ann Elvira Lewis, daughter of Colonel Richard, was born 



310 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

about 1799, in Rutherford county, North Carolina. She married 
Joseph Van Shanklin, a lawyer by profession, of Pendleton Village, 
S. C, where she died in 1859. J. V. Shanklin, her husband, died 
at the same place in 1862. They raised three children, viz.: 

F 1. Rev. Joseph Augustus 

F 2. Captain Julius Lewis, and 

F 3. Edward Henry. 

F 1. Rev. Joseph Augustus Shanklin, was born about 1826; was 
a graduate of the University of Virginia. He was an Episcopal 
minister, and Rector of St. Peter's church at Charleston, S. C. He 
died of yellow fever in Charleston, and was buried at St, Peter's 
church. He married Catharine Ann, daughter of Henry M. Sadler, 
of Jacksonville, Fla. He had by her five children, viz. : Gr 1, 
Catharine Ann; G 2, Edwin Albertie, died; G 3, Mary Lewis; G 4, 
Lila; G 5, Joseph Augustus. 

After the death of Rev. J. A. Shanklin, his widow married Rev. 
J. H. Elliott, of Charleston, S. C, now of Georgia. 

F 2. Mary Lewis, daughter of James Overton, married Dr. Bev- 
erly Allen Henry, of Ruckersville, Elbert county, Ga. He was raised 
and educated by his aunt, Mrs. Mildred Allen, who afterward mar- 
ried John Frederick Gray, of Louisville, Miss. The names of their 
offspring are: G 1, Beverly Allen, died; G 2, Overton Lewis; G 3, 
Lucy, etc. 

F 3. Dr. Thomas L. Lewis, son of James Overton, married Miss 
Eliza Maxwell, daughter of John Maxwell. Their children's names 
are: G 1, Elizabeth Earle, born 1849; G 2, Mary T. ; G 3, Mattie 
D. ; G 4, Julia K. ; G 5, Emily W., etc. 

F 4. Captain Richard L., son of James 0. Lewis, belonged to 
Captain Kilpatrick's company. He served in the Civil war of 1861, 
' 62, ' 63, ' 64 and ' 65. Went in as a private. Company B, 4th South 
Carolina Regiment; was elected 3d Lieutenant in the P. S. S. Jenkins 
Brigade, Longstreet's Corps; served four years with the same com- 
pany; was in all the principal battles — commencing with the first 
Manassas, July 21, 1861; was in all the battles around Richmond; 
was in second Manassas, Antietam; with Longstreet through East 
Tennessee ; through the AVilderness, etc. , until the surrender. 

In one of the battles around Richmond he had thirty-two 
men under his command when he went into the battle — he came 
out with only one; the balance were all killed, wounded or taken 
prisoners. 

During the campaign through Tennessee his rations were four 



aENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 311 

ears of corn per day. He suffered from hunger, half-clothed, 
-wounded and in prison. 

The following incident, copied from the Richmond Sentinel^ was 
published in the Mobile Register^ October 17, 1863: 

Our cavalry boys occasionally play off a Yankee trick which makes 
the wooden-nutmeg heroes open their eyes. 

Not long ago two j'oungsters — Channing Smith and Richard Lewis, of 
the Black Horse scouts, got some intimation that a band of sutlers were 
coming up the Warrenton turnpike from Alexandria, and determined to 
nab them if possible. While lying in wait for their expected prey five 
newsboys came jogging merrily along, whistling for lack of thought. Our 
two grey-coats charged them boldly, when they surrendered at discretion. 
The proposal was made to them, that if they would assist in capturing the 
sutlers their horses should be returned to them ; and, true to their Yankee 
instinct they accepted it. Presently, on came nine sutlers armed to the 
teeth ; the seven charged on them and led them off, unresisting captives, 
into an adjoining wood, where they were disarmed, and after a little 
parley our boys sold them one of their own wagons to carry them back 
from the Old Virginia shore. 

About this stage of the proceedings, a gentleman came up with the 
party. One of the sutlers said : " I suppose you have come to see how 
nine fools have been taken in by seven of your men." Five of the seven 
were Yankees. "Who are you? said the sutlers to the newsboys." 
"Yankees," replied they. The newsboys received back their horses, the 
sutlers mounted their empty wagon, and our boys brought their spoils safe 
through to Dixie, and, it is said, realized $30,000 by the operation. 

After the close of the war he was nominated by Hon. W3"att 
Aikin, M. C, and appointed Post-master at Central, Pickens county, 
S. C. He married Miss Sue Gaines, of Pickens county. South Caro- 
lina, but left no posterity. He died of apoplexy at Central, S. C. , 
in April, 1890, aged about sixty years. 

F 5. Frances, daughter of James 0. Lewis, married in 1857, 
E. A. Tate. 

F 6. R. Fielding, son of James O. Lewis. 

F 7. John E. , was a member of Captain Kilpatrick's company 
in the Confederate war and was one of the Captain's body-guards. 
He married Florence Boatright, of Columbia, S. C. 

F 8. Lucy. 

F 9. James Clarkson, belonged to Longstreet's company through 
Tennessee; was wounded and taken prisoner in 1861. 

F 10. James Overton, married Miss Martha R. Sharpe, of Pen- 
dleton, S. C. She is a granddaughter of Rob. Y. Hayne, ex-Gov- 
ernor of South Carolina, and a descendant of the Pickneys and 



312 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Laurences, of South Carolina. His post-office is No. 1511 Eoss 
avenue, Dallas, Tex. 

F 2. Julius Shanklin, son of J. V., was born in 1829. In 1857 
he represented Anderson count}', South Carolina, in the State Legis- 
lature. During the Confederate war he was elected Captain of a 
company in the 4th Regiment of South Carolina Volunteers. 

F 3. E. Henry, son of J. V. Shanklin, married in 1867, Jenny, 
the daughter of Dr. William Robinson, of Pendleton, S. C. , and is 
a farmer living near Pendleton, S. C. 

E 6. John E. Lewis, son of Colonel Richard, was born about 
1801, and died a bachelor, in 1840. 

E 7. Sarah Ann, daughter of Colonel Richard Lewis, was born 
about 1806, in Rutherford county. North Carolina. She was a 
woman of medium size, with blue eyes and auburn hair. In 1834 
she married Edwin Reese, a merchant at Pendleton, S. C, who was 
a son of George Reese. They finally settled in Auburn, Ala., where 
they both died — she in 1865, and he in 1877. They were both mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church. They raised seven children, viz. : 

F 1. Ann Eliza, married A. B. Croft, in 1855, and died at West 
Point, Ga. , in 1874. 

F 2. Richard Lewis, was a soldier in the Confederate war; mar- 
ried Carrie Lightfoot, in 1868; is a member of the Baptist church, 
and resides near Evanston, Fla. 

F 3. John Lewis, was a soldier in the Confederate war. He mar- 
ried Emma Pope, in 1865; was a member of the Presbyterian 
church, and died in Callahan county, Texas, in 1882. 

F 4. Sarah Miller, married W. E. Smith, in 1864. Their post- 
office is Opelika, Ala. 

F 5. Mary Eleanora, is a member of the Presbyterian church; 
post-office, Auburn, Ala. 

F 6. Carolina Alabama, is a Presbyterian; post-office. West 
Point, Troup, Ga. 

F 7. Margaret Miriam, first married Professor E. Q. Thornton, 
in 1878. Her second marriage was to G. W. Barnett, in 1882. 
Their post-office is Montgomery, Ala. 

F 1. Anna E. Croft left two children, viz. : G 1, George Richard, 
married Lola Blitch, in 1886, and G 2, Annie M., married William 
B. Boyd, in 1885. 

F 2. Richard L. Reese has four children, viz. : G 1, Edwin; G 2, 
Clyde; G 3, Maggie, and G 4, John. 

F 3. John Reese left five children, viz. : G 1, Maud, married 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 313 

William Robinson, in 1888; G 2, Pope; G 3, Pauline; G 4, Eugenia, 
and G 5, Earle. 

E 9. Andrew Fielding Lewis, son of Colonel Richard, born about 
1808; married Susan M. Sloan, daughter of David Sloan and his 
wife, Miss Nancy Trimmier, daughter of Obadiah Trimmier. He 
resides at his father's old homestead near Pendleton Village, S. C. 
He is about six feet in stature, with blue eyes and dark auburn hair. 
In 1858 he was elected a member of the South Carolina Legisla- 
ture. The following are the names of his ten children, viz. : 

F 1. Richard, was born near Pendleton Village, in Anderson 
county, S. C, about 1846. 

The following notice is copied from the Weekly Constitution, 
Atlanta, Ga., Tuesday, January 12, 1892. 

SUICIDE OF RICHARD LEWIS. 
[Special.] 

Richard Lewis, Master of Equity and Judge of Probate of Oconee 
•county, committed suicide in his office at Walhalla to-daj% by shooting 
himself through the heart with a pistol. Judge Lewis has held the two 
offices above-mentioned for many years, and was one of the popular men in 
the county. He entered the Confederate Army when but fifteen years old, 
and at sixteen was promoted to lieutenant for bravery on the field. In Colo- 
nel Walker's South Carolina Infantry, Bratton's Brigade, Longstreet's 
Corps, he lost a leg, and was otherwise terribly wounded. Continuous suf- 
fering and prostration of the nervous system is the supposed cause of his 
suicide. 

Columbia, S. C, January 4, 1893. 

F 2. David Sloan, died in the Confederate Army. 

F 3. John E. 

F 4. William, accidentally shot and killed himself. 

F 5. Sue A. 

F 6. Sally M. 

F 7. James Overton. 

F 8. Andrew Fielding. 

F 9. Emma Elford, died in 1859, and 

F 10. Barnard Bee. 



314 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



CHAPTER XY. 

HENRY G. LEWIS, OF BUNCOMBE COUNTY, N. C. 

D 8. Henry Graves Lewis, son of John, of Albemarle county, 
Virginia, and his wife, Sarah Taliaferro, was born in 1767, and was- 
a twin-brother to Mrs. Frances Rhodes Twitty, of Rutherford county, 
North Carolina. 

When a boy he and his brother were out chopping with an ax. 
He, wishing to chop a while, asked his brother for the ax ; but his 
brother refusing to grant his request, he determined to stop him 
from cutting by placing his hand on the log where his brother was 
chopping. His brother paid no attention to his hand but continued 
chopping, consequently chopped off the ends of all his fingers on his 
left hand; hence he was called "Stump-fingered Henry Lewis." 

He was a tailor by trade, and emigrated from Albemarle county, 
Virginia, to Rutherford county. North Carolina, with his father, 
before the Revolutionary war. 

He- married Morning Mills, daughter of Colonel Wm. Mills and 
granddaughter of Ambrose Mills, about the year 1791 and settled in 
what was then Buncombe county, near where the town of Hender- 
sonville has since been built as the county seat of Henderson county; 
Henderson county was formed in 1838 from Buncombe. 

Colonel William Mills was a son of Ambrose Mills. He emigrated 
to the "Block House " on the Catawba and thence to Green river, in 
Rutherford county, in 1766. He was of English extraction and was. 
born on James river, Virginia, in 1746. He married Eleanor Morris, 
of South Carolina, with whom he lived sixty-nine years, and died in 
1834, and is buried near Edneyville, in Henderson county, N. C. 
He was a man of small stature, but very compact and sinewy, with 
strong constitution and indomitable courage. He was a very benevo- 
lent, industrious, kind-hearted, honest man. When he first settled 
in the country the Indians were very numerous and, like all new 
settlers on the frontiers, he had to fight his way with the savages. 
Several times they pillaged and burned his houses and left him and 
his wife without a shelter. Mills Gap and Mills river, in Hender- 
son county, took their names from him. 

D 8. Henry G. Lewis raised eleven children and died in 1815 in 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMITiY. 315 

Buncombe county, North Carolina, now Henderson. The following 
are the names of his children : 

E 1. Wm. Jones, born 1792; married Celia Wilson. 

E 2. Sarah Myra, born 1794; married Rev. David Hilliard. 

E 3. Marville Franklin, born 1796; died single at sea 1833. 

E 4. Phalby Caroline, born 1798; married Rev. Thos. W. 
Craven. 

E 5. Richard Tali^aferro, born 1800; married Elizabeth Case. 

E 6. Sophia Melinda, born 1801 ; married General Philip Brit- 
tain. 

E 7. Eliza Eleanor, born 1803; married Dr. Marville Mills 
Edney. 

E 8. John DeLafayette, born 1804; died single in Polk county, 
North Carolina, 1857. 

E 9. Jas. Madison, born 1810; married Leander E. Perdue. 

E 10. Dr. George Walton, born 1812; married Lucy H. Wel- 
born. 

E 11. Henry Rufus, born 1814; married Nancy Goodbread. 

E 1. Wm. J. Lewis, eldest child of Henry G., was born in Bun- 
combe county. North Carolina, in 1792. About the year 1826 he 
located in Burnsville, Yancey county, N. C, as a merchant. About 
1829 he married Celia Wilson, of Yancey county. He was very gen- 
erous, free-hearted and liberal toward his friends. He endorsed 
notes for his friends to a large amount and had them to pay, which 
finally broke him up in his old age. He acted as Clerk of the County 
Court for many years in Yancey county. He died in 1853, leaving 
four children, viz. : 

F 1. Rufus Henry, born 1830. 

F 2. Louisa Morning, born 1832; married J. B. Woodfin. 

F 3. Oscar Marville, born 1835. 

F 4. Mary Eliza, born 1842. 

E 2. Sarah Myra Lewis, daughter of Henry G., was born 1794, 
and married Rev. David Hilliard, who was for many years a Metho- 
dist preacher, but joined the Baptist church about the year 1853. He 
was a soldier in the War of 1812. He had for some years resided at 
Spartanburg C. H. , S. C. They both died in Asheville, N. C, he 
in 1870 and she in 1871. They had four children, viz. : 

F 1. Dr. William Lewis Hilliard, born 1823; married a Miss- 
Margaret Love, of Buncombe county. North Carolina, and resides at 
Asheville, the county seat. He graduated in medicine after attend- 
ing lectures in Philadelphia in 1849 and 1850. He once fought a> 



316 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

duel with a Mr. Hymes; the difficulty grew out of a political differ- 
ence. He has nine children, viz. : G 1, Jas. Robert; Gr 2, Dr. Wm. 
David; Gr 3, Sam Haywood; Gr4, Sarah Maria; G 5, Charles Eugene; 
Gr 6, Margaret Josephine; G 7, Walter Lee; G 8, Ida Love, and 
G 9, Howard M. 

F 2. Ann Eliza, daughter of Sarah M. Hilliard, born 1825; died. 

F 3. Sophia Melinda Hilliard, born 1826; married Wm. Brem ic 
1857; resides at Spartanburg, S. C. She had only two children, viz. ; 
G 1, Wm. Thos., died single; G 2, Mamie Louise. 

F 4. Mary Jane Hilliard, born 1828; died 1869. 

F 5. Jas. Henry, born 1831 ; was Post-master in Asheville, N. C, 
in 1858. 

E 3. Marville Franklin Lewis, son of Henry G., was born 1796. 
He merchandised a few years at Greenville C. H., S. C. His health 
became impaired. He wound up his business, started to the Island 
of Cuba, but died just before he reached the island on board of a 
vessel bound for Cuba in 1833. He never married. 

E 4. Phalby Caroline Lewis, daughter of Henry G., was born in 
1798, and married Rev. Thomas W. Craven, from Randolph county, 
North Carolina, in 1821 and resided in Floyd county, Georgia. Her 
post-office was Cave Spring, Floyd count}', where she died. They 
moved from Rutherford county, North Carolina, in 1823, to Georgia. 
They had seven children, viz. : 

F 1. Dr. Lewis McKendrie Craven, born 1822; married C. J. 
Wooten ; resides at Cave Spring, Floyd county, Ga. 

F 2. Sophia Mary Craven, born 1824; married Rufus Barker, a 
farmei;, in Floyd county, Georgia. 

F 3. John Henry Craven, born 1826; married Nancy Logan. 

F 4. Wm. Mills Craven, born 1828; married Sarah Dobbins. 

F 5. Caroline Minerva Craven, born 1830; married James W. P. 
W^are, a planter. 

F 6. Louisa Orilla Craven, born 1832; married Dr. A. M. Turner. 

F 7. Thomas Augustus Craven, born 1835. 

E 5. Richard Taliaferro Lewis, son of Henry G., was born 1800. 
He married Elizabeth Case, daughter of Captain Thomas Case, and 
resides near Henderson C. H., N. C. He has been a merchant and 
farmer and has no progeny. 

E 6. Sophia Melinda Lewis, daughter of Henry G. , was born in 
1801. She married General Philip Brittain and died at Boyleston, 
Henderson county, N. C, in 1877. General B. was a soldier in the 
War of 1812. He represented Buncombe county in the House of 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 317 

Commons in 1810, 1811, 1816, 1817 and 1838, and as Senator in 
1823 and 1824. See Wheeler's History of North Carolina, page 54. 
From Bennett's Chronology of North Carolina, page 100. 

General Philip Brittain was a man of strong mind and constitution, and 
represented his constituents in various public oiBces. He was elected 
several times to the Legislature from Buncombe ; while there, perhaps his 
last time, Henderson county was formed and received its name at his sug- 
gestion, after "Old General Henderson," a worthy citizen of the State. He 
was an industrious, enterprising, public-spirited man. He married Sophia, 
daughter of Widow Lewis, raised a large family and died in 1848 at an 
advanced age. 

Issue of Sophia M. Lewis and General Phil, Brittain: 

F 1, Philip, died single. 

F 2. Stanhope, resides at Hendersonville, N. C. He served as 
a captain of the Home Guard in the War of 1861: 

F 3. Morning, married Dr. Joseph Blackstock and died in Arkan- 
sas about 1877, leaving three children, viz. : G 1, Joseph; G 2, 
Sophia, and G 3, Ernest. Their post-office is Garden Brook, Ark. 

F 4. Attilla Delila, married Wm. Heniy and died in 1860 in 
Henderson county, North Carolina, leaving four children, viz. : G 1, 
Charlotte; G 2, Pat; G 3, Sophia, and G 4, William. 

F 5. James, died single. 

F 6. Benjamin Brittain, resides at Hendersonville, N. C. He 
served as a lieutenant in a cavalry company during the Confederate 
war. 

F 7. Laura H. , married Goodson Cairens, of Henderson count}', 
North Carolina, and has three children, viz.: G 1, Lula; G 2, Lela, 
and G 3, Lila. 

F 8. Emma Eugenia, married Norris Allison ; has no children. 
Her post-office is Boyleston, N. C. 

F 9. Rebecca T., married Millard G. Jones and resides in Bun- 
combe county. North Carolina. 

F 10. Wm. Gaston, married Pamelia McDowell and resides in 
Spartanburg, S. C. He has four children, viz. : G 1, Eugenia; G 2, 
Sophia; G 3, Pearl, and G 4, Carl. 

E 7. Eliza Eleanor, daughter of Henry G. Lewis, was born in 
1803, and married Dr. Marville Mills Edney, her cousin, son of Asa 
Edney, who married Sally, daughter of Colonel Wm. Mills. 

Asa Edney was from Pasquotank count}'. North Carolina, and 
was a descendant of Robert Edney, an Englishman, who married the 
sister of Sir Isaac Newton, the philosopher. 



318 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Marville M. Edney, son of Asa, was a merchant, farmer and 
physician; resides at Edneyville, in Henderson county, N. C. He 
and his wife, Eliza E. Lewis, raised twelve children, viz. : 

F 1. Lucian Edney. 

F 2, Henry Edney, married Harriet Rogers, of South Carolina. 

F 3. Rose Ann E., married George J. Nix, a farmer, and has 
the following children: G 1, Martha M. ; G 2, James M. ; G 3, 
Amanda; G 4, Sarah A. ; G 5, Craivil A. ; G 6, Morrison, and G 7, 
Jane R. 

F 4, Sophia A. Edney. 

F 5. Eliza T. Edney, married John Burgess, a tanner by trade. 

F 6. John C. Edney, married Rose Anna Carlin, daughter of 
Hiram, of Henderson county. North Carolina. 

F 7. Emma R. Edney. 

F 8. Morning S. Edney. 

F 9. Marville T. Edney. 

F 10. Lewis M. Edney. 

F 11. William Mills Edney, and 

F 12. Edmund Randolph Edney. 

E 8. John DeLafayette Lewis, son of Henry G., was born in 
1804. He was about five feet five inches in height, weighing about 
one hundred and forty pounds, with dark hair and black eyes. He 
died a bachelor in 1857, at the house of Columbus Mills, in Polk 
county. North Carolina. He was a very generous, free-hearted man, 
and very much beloved and respected by all who knew him. He 
was a soldier in the Seminole war in Florida. 

E 9. James Madison, son of Henry G. Lewis, was born in Bun- 
combe county, North Carolina (now Anderson), in 1810. He is about 
five feet eight inches in height, weighing about one hundred and 
fifty pounds, with dark hair and eyes. He was Librarian and 
Keeper of the State-house for many years in Jackson, Miss. 

He married Leander E. Perdue, in Madison county, Mississippi, 
in 1847, by whom he had two children, viz.: 

F 1. Mary P., born in 1849, and 

F 2. Henry Bascombe, born in 1851, and died in 1854. 

Mrs. Leander E. Lewis died in Yazoo county, Mississippi, and 
her remains were interred in the graveyard near Vernon, Miss. 

James M. Lewis was residing in Asheville, N. C, in 1886. 

E 10. Dr. George Walton Lewis, son of Henry G., was born in 
1812. He studied medicine and located in Lincoln county, Georgia, 
where he had an extensive practice for twelve or fifteen years. He 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 319 

married, about 1837, in Columbia county, Georgia, Lucy H. Well- 
born, by whom he had two children, viz.: F 1, Martha Octavia, born 
in 1840, and F 2, Mary George, born in 1846. 

Dr. Geo. W. Lewis died in Lincoln county, Georgia, in 1847, in 
the meridian of life. As a physician he was eminent and skillful ; 
as a citizen, neighbor and friend he was much esteemed for his 
prudence, generosity, charitableness, lofty bearing without ostenta- 
tion, and as a Christian he was God-fearing and humble in all the 
walks of life. None knew him but to love him. 

His wife and two daughters survive him and reside near Winfield, 
Columbia county, Ga. 

E 11. Rufus Henry Lewis, son of Henry G., was born in 1814. 
He was a farmer and died near Edneyville, N. C. He married 
Nancy Goodbred, daughter of John Goodbred, of Rutherford county, 
North Carolina, They had the following-named children: F 1, John 
Goodbred; F 2, Marville Franklin; F 3, Mary W. ; F 4, Richard 
Taliaferro; F 5, Sophia Melinda; F 6, Rufus Henry; F 7, Ellen 
Caledonia, and F 8, Jeff. Davis Lewis. 



320 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FA3IILT. 



CHAPTEE XYI. 

FRANCES R. TWITTY. 

D 9. Frances Rhodes, daughter of John Lewis and his wife, 
Sarah Taliaferro, of Albemarle county, Virginia, was born in 1767, 
and was a twin-sister to Henry G. Lewis, of Buncombe county, North 
Carolina. Frances R. married Wm. Twitty in 1784 and died in 
Rutherford county. North Carolina, in 1838. Wm. Twitty was a 
Revolutionary soldier. His name can be found in ' ' King' s Mountan 
and its Heroes," by Lyman C. Draper, on pages 145, 146 and 259. 

Issue of Frances R. and Wm. Twitty, viz. : 

E 1.' Susannah, born 1785; married Wm. Graham. 

E 2. Wm. Lewis, born 1787; died single. 

E 3. John Rhodes, born 1791 ; married Elizabeth Wilkins. 

E 4, Sarah, born 1794; married John Moore. 

E 5. Robert G., born 1797; married Mary Logan. 

E 6. Mildred C. , born 1799 ; married Jo. Bowen and Jno. Wilkins. 

E7. Russell, born 1801; died single. 

E 1. Susannah Twitty, was born in 1785, and married William 
Graham, Jr. , brother of Ezekiel and son of Wm. Graham, Sr. , the 
signer of the Mecklenburg declaration of independence. William 
Graham, Sr. , was a brother to General George Graham, General 
Joseph Graham and Mrs. Griffith Rutherford, of Revolutionary fame. 
See History of North Carolina, by Wheeler. 

Mrs. Susannah Graham and Wm. Graham died in Tippah county, 
Mississippi; she in 1845 and he in 1858. They raised nine children, 
viz. : 

F 1. Elmina Graham, was born 1807 in Rutherford county, 
North Carolina, and married Joseph Goodwin. She is a widow 
residing near Suwannee, Gwinnett county, Ga. (1858). She raised 
seven children, viz. : 

G 1. Thomas Goodwin, born 1831; married Esther Shielde, and 
is a merchant residing in Warren, Bradley county, Ark. 

G 2. Caroline Goodwin, born 1832; married James B. Gilbert, a 
farmer near Cobbs Mills, Cherokee county, Ala., and has children 
as follows: H 1, Harriet Emma, born 1852; H 2, James, born 1855; 
H 3, Iverson, born 1858, etc. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 321 

G 3. William Groodwiii, born 1834; married Josephine Strickland; 
resides near Mellville, Chattooga county, Ga., and has issue, viz.: 
H 1, Ada, born 1856, etc. 

Gr 4. John Goodwin, born 1837, and died 1847. 

G 5. Mary Ann Goodwin, born 1839. 

G 6. Frances Goodwin, born 1842; died in childhood. 

G 7. Kobert Emmett Goodwin, born 1844, and died 1858. 

F 2. Margaret P., daughter of Susannah Twitty and William 
Graham, was born in Rutherford county. North Carolina, in 1809, 
and married, in Gwinnett county, Georgia, in 1835, Allen Weems, 
a farmer. Mr. Weems was born in Franklin county, Georgia, in 
1806 and now (1856) resides in Cherokee county, Alabama, near 
Spring Garden. 

They had the following children: 

G 1. Frances Melvina Weems, born in Forsyth county, Georgia, 
in 1835, and died in 1838; G 2, Susannah Elizabeth Weems, born 
1837 in Fors3'th county, Georgia, and married John 1. Smith, of 
Cherokee count}^, Alabama, in 1856; G 3, Elmina Weems, born 1840 
and died 1840; G 4, Sarah Ann Weems, born 1841 and died 1844; 
G 5, Augustus Weems, born in Gwinnett county, Georgia, in 1845, 
and G 6, Mary Caroline Weems, born in 1849. 

F 3. Jane M. , daughter of Susan Twitty and William Graham, 
born in 1819; married Claiborne H. Thompson, had six children and 
died in Forsyth county, Georgia, in 1851. Mr. Thompson resides 
near Cumming, Forsyth county, Ga. The following are the names 
of their children: 

G 1. William G., born 1836; is a Methodist. 

G 2. Joseph R., born 1839. 

G 3. James M. , born 1841 ; is a Methodist. 

G 4. Mary Susanna, born 1844; is a Methodist. 

G 5. Elmina Jane, born 1846; is a Methodist, and 

G 6. Robert A., born 1849. 

F 4. William Lewis, son of Susan Twitty and Wm. Graham, was 
born about 1811 in Rutherford county. North Carolina. When a 
youth he cut his knee with a drawing knife. The synovial fluid 
escaped and left him with a stiff knee; hence, he is familiarly known 
as " Trigger-leg Graham." He is a merchant and resides near Cot- 
ton Plant P. 0., Tippah county, Miss. 

His first wife was Margaret Pearce ; his second was a Miss Martha 
0. Northcross. He had four children by his first wife, viz. : G 1, 
Thomas R., married 3Iary J. Collins; G 2, Watty; G 3, Mary; G 4, 
21 



322 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Sarah ; and two children by his second wife, viz. : Gr 5, Martha 0. , 
and G 6, William. 

F 5. Frances Grraham, daughter of Susan Twitty and Wm. 
Graham, born 1813; resides with her brother, Wm. L., in Tippah 
county, Mississippi. 

F 6. Sarah Graham, died single in 1850. 

F 7. Robert, died single. 

F 8. James H. Graham, born 1820; married Amanda Lowry and 
has four children, viz. : G 1, Emma; G 2, Wm. Robert; G 3, Margaret, 
and G 4, Thomas, born 1857. James H. Graham died ^n 1864 and 
his wife in 1859 near McLean's store, Tippah county, Mississippi. 

F 9. Joseph F., son of Susan Twitty and Wm. Graham, born 
1825; married Louisa Stowe in 1851. Their children are: G 1, 
Sarah, born 1852; G 2, Frances V., born 1853; G 3, William M., 
born 1856; G 4, Martha, born 1859, and G 5, Lula, born 1862. 
Sarah died 1854, Martha died 1861 and Lula died 1865. He resides 
near New Albany, Pontotoc county, Miss. 

E 2. Wm. Lewis, son of Frances and Wm. Twitty, was born in 
1787, and died single in Rutherford county. North Carolina, in 1809. 
He was a young man of great promise, endowed with a brilliant 
intellect and bid fair to make a useful member of society, but was 
cut off in the bloom of life. 

E 3. John Rhodes, son of Frances R. Lewis and Wm. Twitty, 
was born 1791 in Rutherford county. North Carolina, where he died 
in 1857. He was about five feet ten inches in stature, with dark 
hair and eyes. He was a very raw-boned, lean-visaged man, and in 
point of hard-favoredness he had but few equals. He was rather an 
eccentric man, kind hearted and generous, fond of friends and social 
enjoyments, and would often entertain his friends by narrating 
amusing anecdotes and spinning long yarns. 

In 1819 he married Elizabeth Wilkins, daughter of Terrell Wil- 
kins, on Pacolet river, S. C. Terrell Wilkins was said to be the 
ugliest man in the county. 

The friends of Aaron Kemp proffered to wager a gallon of whisky 
that they could produce an uglier man than Terrell Wilkins. The 
friends of Wilkins accepted the challenge, Kemp and Wilkins were 
brought forward by their friends — an umpire of three were appointed 
to decide the mooted question. They decided that Wilkins was the 
ugliest man, and his friends paid the forfeit. After the betrothment 
between John R. Twitty and Elizabeth Wilkins, her mother opposed 
its consummation upon the ground that John R. Twitty was so ugly. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 323 

*'La, mother!" remarked Elizabeth, "just look at dad! What did 
you marry him for ? " It is useless to remark that the mother gave 
her consent to the nuptials. 

John R. Twitty was wont to remark waggishly to his friends that 
" he married his wife for love and that his wife married him for his 
beauty. ' ' He acted as deputy sheritf for many years in Rutherford 
county, North Carolina. His occupation was that of a farmer. He 
was an upright, honest man in all his dealings with mankind. ' ' The 
noblest work of God. ' ' John R. Twitty had twelve children, viz. : 

F 1. Sarc^h T., born 1821. 

F 2. Elizabeth C, born 1824. 

F 3. Mildred S., born 1825, and died 1826. 

F 4. William Lewis, born 1827, and died 1827. 

F 5. Frances M., born 1830. 

F 6. John W., born 1832, and died 1837. 

F 7. Melissa J., born 1834. 

F 8. Susan E., born 1836, and died 1837. 

F 9. Minerva A., born 1838. 

F 10. James R., born 1840. 

F 11. Ruth M., born 1844, and 

F 12. Ellen M., born 1847. 

F 1. Sarah T. Twitty, daughter of John R., married William W. 
Taylor in 1851 and has children, viz. : Gr 1, Mary S. Taylor, born 
1851, etc. 

F 2. Elizabeth C. Twitty, married Robert Wilkins in 1847 and 
resides in Union county, South Carolina. 

F 5. Frances M., married Alexander Hawbusson in 1856 and is 
living in Union county. South Carolina. 

E 4. Sarah Twitty, daughter of William and Frances, was born 
1794. In 1824 she married John Moore (merchant), by whom she 
had five children. They both died in Rutherford county, North 
Carolina; he in 1841 and she in 1852. Their children were: 

F 1. Jane, born 1825; married Jason H. Carson, son of Jo., of 
Rutherford county, North Carolina. Jo. Carson was a brother to 
Sam. P. Carson, M. C. Jason H. Carson resides near Spartanburg 
C. H., S. C, and has the following-named children: 

G 1. John Moore, born 1844; G 2, George, born 1845; G 3, Re- 
bekah W., born 1847; G 4, Thomas M., born 1849; G 5, Sarah M., 
born 1850; G 6, Ralph Kennedy, born 1854, etc. 

F 2. Richard Moore, born 1827; married, in 1853, Margaret 
Drake, by whom he has children, viz. : G 1, John M., born 1854, etc. 



324 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

F 3. Thomas Moore, born 1829, and died in 1850. 

F 4. John Moore, Jr., born in 1831; died 1848. 

F 5. William Moore, born in 1835; died 1854. 

E 5. Robert Gr. Twitty, son of William and Frances, was born in 
1797, and married, in 1833, Mary Logan, daughter of Francis Logan, 
of Rutherford county. North Carolina. He was for many years 
engaged in selling goods at Rutherfordton, N. C. , but finally settled in 

the county on a farm, where he died in 1864. His son, , died 

in the Confederate Army, and his remains were brought home the 
day his father was buried, and both were interred in the same grave. 
The names of Robert G. Twitty' s children are: 

F 1. William Lewis; F 2, Margaret; F 3, Frances; F 4, Theo- 
dorick Birchett; F 5, Mary, and F 6, Sarah A. 

E 6. Mildred C. Twitty, daughter of William and Frances, was 
born in 1799. She was about five feet high, with black hair and 
eyes; was a member of the Methodist church. In 1820 she married 
Joseph Bowen, a merchant of Rutherfordton, N. C. In 1837 she 
married John Wilkins, son of Terrell Wilkins, of Rutherford county. 
North Carolina, who was also a merchant and farmer. She had two 
children by each husband, and died in 1855. Their names are: 

F 1. Mary F. Bowen, born in 1822; married Dr. William Ander- 
son, Sr. , by whom she had one son: G 1, Dr. William Anderson, 
Jr., who married Georgiana Deal, of Hollidaysburg, Pa., and now 
(1889) resides near Black's Station, York county, S. C. 

The following sketch we copy from the Yorkville Enquirer, of 
September 25, 1889: 

DR. WILLIAM ANDERSON, 

One of the most prominent physicians of Western York was born in 
Rutherfordton, N. C, in 1847. His father, who was also a physician, came 
to the United States from the north of Ireland, about the year 1840, and his 
mother, who is still living, is a native of Rutherfordton, though now a res- 
ident of Blacksburg. The Doctor joined the Army of Northern Virginia 
in 1863, when only sixteen years old, as a courier for Major-General Wilcox, 
and served until the close of the war, being paroled at Appomattox. In 
1866 he attended school at Bingham, N. C, and commenced the study of 
medicine at his home at Rutherfordton in 1873. After attending a course 
of lectures at the University of the city of New York, and another at 
Charleston Medical College, he graduated from the latter institution in 
March, 1880, and at once commenced the practice of his profession. 

In 1884 he was married to Miss Georgia Deal, of Hollidaysburg, Pa., 
and two years later located in Blacksburg, where he has since been engaged 
in building up a large practice and contributing a most valuable influence 
in the social and industrial progress of the town. Dr. Anderson is a man 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 325 

of exceptionally high Christian character, fine intellectual attainments, 
and a physician of tried ability, and his practice, which consumes nearly 
all of his time, extends among the best people of that whole section. 

The following sketch we copy from the Atlanta Journal, of May 
8, 1891. In speaking of the citizens of Blacksburg, York county, 

S. C, it says: 

One of the best informed, best known and most popular men of the town 
is Dr. William Anderson. His father is a native of the north of Ireland — 
that part of the country noted for producing good people. Dr. Anderson 
was born in Rutherford ton, N. C, something near forty years ago. He 
joined the Army of Northern Virginia at the age of sixteen, and fought as 
hard for the Confederacj' then as he is struggling for the material develop- 
ment of the Union now. He attended medical lectures in Charleston, New 
York Citj' and elsewhere ; graduated with high distinction and is now a 
very prominent member of his profession. He commands a very extensive 
practice and is one of the busiest, best and pleasantest men of our 
acquaintance. 

F 3. Sarah J. Wilkins, born in 1838. 
F 4. William R. Wilkins, born in 1840. 

E 7. Russell Twittj^ son of William and Frances Lewis, was 
born in 1801, and died single in Rutherford county, North Carolina. 



CHAPTER XYII. 

JULIUS C. LEWIS. 
D 11. Julius Clarkson Lewis, son of John by his second wife, 
Susan Clarkson, was born in 1774. He died in childhood, and was 
a twin-brother to Major David Jackson Lewis, of Breckinridge 
county, Kentucky. 



326 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



CHAPTEE XYin. 

MAJOR DAVID J. LEWIS. 

D 12. Major David Jackson Lewis, son of John by his second 
wife, Susan Clarkson, was born in Albemarle count}', Virginia, in 
1774; was a twin-brother to Julius Clarkson Lewis. In stature 
David J. was six feet four and a half inches, with dark auburn hair 
and blue eyes, weighing two hundred and fourteen pounds. His 
temperament was nervo-sanguineus. In personal appearance he 
very much resembled General Andrew Lewis, the hero of Point 
Pleasant. In 1794 he volunteered and joined an expedition to 
quell the whisky insurrection in Western Pennsylvania, caused by the 
Government assessing a tax on all whisky that was made. The citi- 
zens refused to pay it and rebelled. It was quelled b}' a body of 
militia commanded b}' Governor Lee, of Maryland, and General 
Morgan, of Virginia, ordered out by General Washington, upon 
whose approach the insurgents laid down their arms, solicited the 
clemency of the Government and promised future submission to the 
laws, etc. 

After the above-mentioned insurrection was quelled. Major David 
J. Lewis and others descended the Ohio river from Pittsburg in flat- 
boats to the falls, where Louisville, Ky. , now stands. He there pur- 
chased a horse and traveled through the interior to Green creek, in 
Bourbon county, Kentucky, to his uncle, Julius Clarkson, and 
thence through the wilderness by a blind trace over bogs, mount- 
ains and rivers, at the peril of scalp, neck and flood. 

He was in active military service at the city of Norfolk, Va. , in 
the War of 1812 with great Britain, where he acted as major in the 
Quartermaster's Department. He was a magistrate, member of the 
County Court and Sheriff of Albemarle county, Virginia, for many 
years previous to his removal from that county, in 1819, to Breckin- 
ridge county, Kentucky. 

To a casual observer he had the semblance of a stern, haughty 
man, yet he contemned and despised an3'thing like ostentation or 
vanity, and no man was more kind and affectionate to his family 
and friends. There was no tie of consanguinity too remote for his 
cordial recognition. He was sensitive in his feelings, refined and 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 32T 

unassuming in his manners, plain and simple in his dress, temperate 
in his desires and regular in his habits. He was never known to 
swerve from the cardinal principles of honesty, integrity, upright- 
ness, probity, sincerity and truth. His motto and advice to his 
family was to live economical, and manufacture everything that 
they could for home consumption. His business qualifications were 
of the highest order. 

About the year 1802 he married Martha, daughter of Glover 
Baker, of Liberty county, Virginia. In 1819 he sold out his pos- 
sessions in Albemarle county, Virginia, and moved to Breckinridge 
county, Kentucky. He sold his land to John M. Perry, for $12,053. 
Nelson Barksdale, the son-in-law of Jesse P. Lewis, of Albemarle 
county, Virginia, became the owner of the land afterward. 

David J. Lewis raised eleven children; eight of them were born 
in Albemarle county, and three in Breckinridge county, Kentucky. 
He and his wife both died in Breckinridge county in 1826. 

The following are the names of their children: 

E 1. Dr. John Terrell, born in 1803. 

E 2. Mary Terrell, born in 1804. 

E 3. Susan Clarkson, born in 1806. 

E 4. Elizabeth Butts, born in 1808. 

E 5. James Harvey, born in 1810. 

E 6. Julius Overton, born in 1812. 

E 7. Maria Madison, born in 1816. 

E 8. Dr. Jesse Pitman, born in 1818. 

E 9. David Benjamin, born in 1820. 

E 10. Martha Jane Washington, born in 1822. 

E 11. Thomas Jefferson, born in 1825. 

E 1. Dr. John Terrell Lewis was born in Albemarle county, Vir- 
ginia, in 1803, and emigrated to Kentucky with his father in 1819. 
His height is six feet three inches, weighing one hundred and fifty- 
five pounds, with light hair, blue eyes, fair skin and of a nervo-san- 
guineus temperament. He is easily excited, hopeful under almost 
all circumstances, cheerful almost to levity, very affable and social. 
His life has been an eventful one. Deprived of both parents in a 
few months — just at a time when he had most need of them — the 
care of his helpless brothers and sisters devolving upon him, many 
of whom soon sank into their graves, were sore trials to his young 
heart. He graduated in the Medical Department of Transylvania 
University of Kentucky in 1828, and by his indefatigable assiduous- 
ness he soon rose to eminence in his profession. He has been act- 



328 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

ively engaged in the practice of his profession up to the present 
time (1875) with the exception of two years spent on his farm, where 
he retired for the purpose of recuperating his lost health. Twelve 
years of his most active professional life were spent in Lexington, Ky. 
In 1826 he married Letitia Gardner Downing, daughter of Francis 
Downing, in the city of Lexington, Ky. She was born in 1806 and 
died in the same place in 1844. 

Francis Downing raised only three children, viz. : 1, Letitia Gr. 
Downing; 2, Francis Downing, Jr., and 3, Richard Downing. 

[Extract from McClung's Sketches of Western Adventure, page 199.] 
In the month of August, 1786, Mr. Francis Downing, Sr., then a 
mere lad, was living in a fort where, subsequent!}*, some iron works were 
erected by Mr. Jacob Myers, which are now known by the name of Slate 
Creek Works, and are the property of Colonel Thomas Dye Owings. About 
the 16th a young man belonging to the fort called upon Downing and 
requested his assistance in hunting for a horse which had strayed away on 
the preceding evening. Downing readily complied, and the two friends 
traversed the woods in every direction until at length, toward evening, 
they found themselves in a wild valley at the distance of six or seven miles 
from the fort. Here Downing became alarmed and repeatedly assured 
his elder companion (whose name was Yates) that he heard sticks cracking 
behind them and was confident that Indians were dogging them. Yates, 
being an experienced hunter, and from habit grown indifferent to the dan- 
gers of the woods, diverted himself freely at the expense of his young com- 
panion, often inquiring at what price he rated his scalp, and offering to 
insure it for a sixpence. Downing, however, was not so easily satisfied. 
He observed that in whatever direction thej- turned the same ominous 
sounds continued to haunt them, and as Yates still treated his fears with 
the most perfect indifference he determined to take his measures upon his 
own responsibility. Gradually slackening his pace, he permitted Yates 
to advance twenty or thirty steps in front of him, and immediately after 
descending a gentle hill he suddenly sprung aside and hid himself in a 
thick cluster of whortleberry bushes. Yates, who at that time was per- 
forming some woodland ditty to the full extent of liis lungs, was too much 
pleased with his own voice to attend either to Downing or the Indians and 
was quicklj' out of sight. Scarcely had he disappeared when Downing, to 
his unspeakable terror, beheld two savages put aside the stalks of a cane- 
brake and look out cautiousl}' in the direction which Yates had taken. 

Fearful that they had seen him step aside he determined to fire upon 
them and trust to his heels for safety, but so unsteady was his hand that 
in raising his gun to his shoulder it went off before he had taken aim. 
He lost no time in following its example, and after having run fifty yards 
he met Yates, who, alarmed at the report, was hastily retracing his steps. 
It was not necessary to inquire what was the matter. The enemy were in 
full view, pressing forward with great rapidity, and "devil take the hind- 
most " was the order of the day. Yates would not outstrip Downing, but 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 829 

ran by his side, although in so doing he risked both of their lives. The 
Indians were well acquainted with the country, and soon took a path that 
diverged from the one which the whites followed at one. point and rejoined 
it at another, bearing the same relation to it that the string does to the 
bow. The two paths were, at no point, distant from each other more than 
one hundred yards, so that Yates and Downing could easily see the enemy 
gaining rapidly upon them. They reached the point of reunion first, how- 
ever, and quickly came to a deep gully which it was necessary to cross or 
retrace their steps. Yates cleared it without difficulty, but Downing, 
being much exhausted, fell short, and falling with his breast against the 
opposite brink rebounded with violence and fell at full length on the bot- 
tom. The Indians crossed the ditch a few yards below him and, eager 
for the capture of Yates, continued the pursuit without appearing to notice 
Downing. The latter, who at first had given himself up for lost, quickly 
recovered his strength and began to walk slowly along the ditch, fearing 
to leave it lest the enemy should see him. As he advanced, however, the 
ditch became more shallow until at length it ceased to protect him at all. 
Looking around cautiously he saw one of the Indians returning apparently 
in quest of him. Unfortunately, he had neglected to reload his gun while 
in the ditch, and as the Indian instantly advanced upon him he had no 
resource but flight. Throwing away his gun, which was now useless, he 
plied his legs manfullj- in ascending a long ridge which stretched before 
him, but the Indian gained upon him so rapidly that he lost all hope of 
escape. Coming, at length to a large poplar which had been blown up by 
the roots, he ran along the body of the tree upon one side while the Indian 
followed it upon the other, doubtless expecting to intercept him at the 
root. But here the supreme dominion of fortune was manifested. It hap- 
pened that a large she-bear was suckling her cubs in a bed which she had 
made at the root of the tree, and as the Indian reached that point first she 
instantly sprang upon him, and a prodigious uproar took place. The 
Indian yelled and stabbed with his knife; the bear growled and saluted 
him with one of her most endearing " hugs, " while Downing, fervently 
wishing her success, ran off through the woods without waiting to see the 
event of the struggle. Downing reached the fort in safety and found 
Yates reposing, after a hot chase, having eluded his pursuers and gained 
the fort two hours before him. On the next morning they collected a 
party and returned to the poplar tree, but no traces either of the Indian or 
bear were to be found. They both probably escaped with their lives, 
although not without injury. 

The foregoing adventure of Francis Downing, Sr., is but one of 
the many in which he was engaged. Most of them were published 
in the Kentucky Gazette by John Bradford, the first editor of the 
first paper published west of the mountains, under the caption of 
Bradford's Notes on Kentucky. 

Mr. Downing' s name is mentioned in the life of Daniel Boone. 
He was in every Indian campaign in which he had a chance to go ; 



330 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

was one of the party from Lexington, or McConnell' s Station, which 
forced their way through Simon Girty' s forces in ambush and safely 
reached Bryan's Station. He was also in one of the divisions pur- 
suing Girty after his retreat, which did not come up until after the 
" Battle of the Blue Licks." When quite a boy he was sent to Lex- 
ington by his father on particular business, when guns were as com- 
mon an appendage to a man as are pocket-knives in our day. He 
chanced to be passing where Gen. Charles Scott' s forces were drilling 
near to Ashland, the subsequent residence of the late Henry Clay, 
and without parley or delay he fell into ranks. A friend urged him 
to go to Lexington, attend to his business and return home, but he 
refused to do so. 

Arrived at Louisville (the falls) the friend determined to appeal 
to Gen. Scott. He did so, telling the old General that he ought to 
send the boy back to his family. Scott had him brought into his 
presence and thus accosted him : ' ' Well, my little man, have you a 
gun?" "Yes, sir." " Have you a horse? " "Yes, sir." "Have 
you any money?" "Yes, sir." "Then, d — n it," said Scott, 
' ' let the little fellow go. ' ' He did go, and in his eagerness to shoot 
a "red skin " in one of his conflicts he came very near being shot 
in the head. His guardian friend was warning him not to thus 
expose himself when a ball aimed at his head struck the bark of the 
tree and forced the flying pieces against his head and in his eyes, 
givino- severe pain. His friend ran to him and asked, "Are you 
hurt much?" "1 reckon I am," said he, feeling deliberately the 
back of his head. " Look for the bullet hole, will you? " 

Mr. Downing lost an eye in early life by the accidental cut of a 
sword, while playfully fencing with a friend, which gave character 
to all his diseases in after life. He died of apoplexy in 
Lexington, Ky., in 1831, aged about sixty. He was beloved and 
esteemed by all who knew him, and was among the most amiable 
of men. 

In 1826 Dr. John T. Lewis married Letitia G. Downing, by whom 
he had seven children, viz. : 

F 1. David Jackson, born 1827; resides at Carrollton, Ky. He 
served three years and six months in the Confederate Army, but 
was never wounded. 

F 2. Frances Downing, born 1828; married, in 1846, Dr. Joel T. 
Hickman, a son of Jas. Lewis Hickman and his wife, Maria Shackel- 
ford, and a grandson of Joel Hickman and his wife, Frances G. Wil- 
son. Dr. Joel T. and his wife are third cousins. Mrs. Frances D. ^ 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 331 

wife of Dr. Joel T. Hickman, died in Christian county, Kentucky, 
in 1861, of pulmonary consumption. She was a sprightly, interesting, 
beautiful and accomplished lady; pure and stainless. She passed 
away from this world to a home in heaven. 

For the names, etc., of her children see Dr. Joel T. Hickman's 
posterity on another page. 

F 3. John James, son of Dr. John T. Lewis, born 1831; died 
1832. 

F 4. Richard Thomas, son of Dr. John T. Lewis, born 1833; 
died 1834. 

F 5. Margaret Downing, daughter of Dr. John T. Lewis, born 
1835; died single. 

F 6. John Terrell, Jr., son of Dr. John T. Lewis, born 1838. 
He was in the Provost Marshal's office in Louisville, Ky., United 
States service, the last year of the War of 1861. 

F 7. Martha Laura, born 1840, and died 1846. 

The seven children of Dr. John T. Lewis by his first wife were all 
born in Lexington, Ky. 

His first wife ha^ing died in 1844, in 1846 he married Sarah Jane 
Bosworth near Lexington, Kj'. , and in 1847 he located in Carrollton, 
Ky., where he resided until his death, which occurred in 1875, 
caused from a fall on the ice on the Ohio river which broke his hip. 

Sarah J., his second wife, died in December, 1891, aged about 
sixty-five years. She was a pious member of the Methodist church. 
Her funeral was preached by Rev. C. J. Nugent. The names of 
his children, by his second wife, are: 

F 8. Dr. Nathaniel Bosworth, was born in 1847, and died at the 
residence of his mother, Mrs. Sarah Lewis, in Carrollton, Ky. , on 
the 13th day of August, 1888, after an illness of twenty-one days, 
of bilious fever complicated with inflammation of the liver. In 
his death the public has lost an upright, moral, worthy citizen ; the 
medical profession an estimable and zealous member, whose manly 
independence and integrity of character entitled him to the esteem 
and respect of the community in which he lived. He was born, 
reared and educated in Carrollton, Ky. He studied his profession 
under the care of his father. Dr. John Terrell Lewis; graduated in 
the year 1869 from the University at Louisville, and soon after 
located in Worthville, Ky. , where he entered upon the arduous duties 
of his profession and established himself in the confidence of the 
public as a skillful and intelligent physician. 



332 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

After his aeath the following sketch appeared in a Carrollton, 
Ky., paper: 

Dr. Nat. B. Lewis is dead! The hopes and prayers of his friends, of the 
entire community, in fact — for all were solicitous as to his condition — did 
not avail to restore him to health, though they were not void of good effect. 
As we went to press last week his condition was critical, but it was hoped 
that his robust constitution would enable him to withstand the great 
enemy ; and people continued to hope almost against hope until the last 
moment. 

Death conquered on Sunday morning. No death which has occurred in 
this county in many a day shocked the people as much as did that of Dr. 
Lewis. He was the perfect picture of health, being strong and well devel- 
oped and onlj' forty years of age. These facts, together with his temperate 
habits, seemed to almost insure that he would be spared yet for many 
years. But how uncertain is life! His sudden death was the severest dis- 
pensation which Providence has recently visited our people. The main 
facts of his life, the circumstances attending his death and the cardinal 
virtues of his character are so well set out in a tribute from the pen of Dr. 
Goslee, printed in another column, that it is unnecessary for us to dwell 
upon them. Suffice it to say that Dr. Goslee does not over-rate the case 
when speaking of the character of the deceased. So far as we are person- 
ally concerned he had always been our friend and for some time our phy- 
sician, and we appreciated him for the real worth of his character. The 
funeral on Wednesda}' afternoon was largely attended, many of his friends 
from Worthville and vicinity being present. 

Rev. M. W. Hiner, who conducted the services, delivered one of the 
very best discourses we ever heard on a similar occasion, and the whole 
audience was moved to tears. The pall-bearers were the president, cashier 
and several of the directors of the First National Bank of Carrollton, the 
deceased having been one of the original stockholders and for some time 
a director of the bank. 

F 9. Ann Moore Madison, born in Madison, Ind., in 1850; mar- 
ried Wm. C. Darling in 1876. 

F 10. Harriet Elizabeth, born in Carrollton in 1852. 

F 11. Charles Henry, born in Carrollton in 1853. 

F 12. Wm. Winstow, born in Carrollton in 1855; married Miss 
Nina B. Splitgerber and resides at Menardsville, Tex. 

F 13. Sarah Jessie, born in Carrollton in 1863. 

F 14. Martha Washington, born in Carrollton in 1866, and 

F 15. George Thomas, born in Carrollton in 1868. 

E 2. Mary Terrell Lewis, daughter of David J., was born in 
Albemarle county, Virginia, in 180-4, and died single in Breckin- 
ridge county, Kentucky, in 1820. 

. E 3. Susan Clarkson, daughter of David J. Lewis, was born in 
1806, and died single in Breckinridge county, Kentucky, in 1826. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 333 

E 4. Elizabeth Butts, daughter of David J. Lewis, was boru ia 
1808. In 1827 she married Samuel Algeo, of Pittsburg, Pa. She 
died in 1832, in Hardinsburg, Breckinridge county, Ky., and he in 
1844. They left two children, viz. : 

F 1. Mary Enfield, born in 1828; married Mr. Brown, and 

F 2. William David, born in 1830. 

E 5. James Harvey Lewis, son of David J., was born in 1810, 
and died single in Lexington, K}-., in 1831. 

E 6. Julius Overton Lewis, son of David J., was born in 1812, 
and died in 1831, while on his way to Texas, near the line between 
Mississippi and Louisiana. He never married. James H. and 
Julius 0., two promising brothers in the bloom of life, were thus 
called from time to eternity. 

"Be ye, therefore, ready also, for the Son of man cometh at an hour 
when ye think not." 

E 7. Maria Madison, daughter of David J. Lewis, born in 1816. 
She married Robert Riley, of Hardinsburg, Ky. , and died near 
Orleans, Ind. She had two children, both of whom died in infancy. 

E 8. Dr. Jesse Pitman, son of David J. Lewis, was born in 1818. 
His height is five feet eleven and three-quarter inches, weighing two 
hundred pounds, with fair skin, blue e^^es and dark hair, and of a 
nervo-sanguineus temperament. He graduated in medicine in 1845, 
at the Transylvania University at Lexington, Ky. He is a member 
of the Methodist church, and resides near "Webster, Meade county, 
Ky. In 1842 he married Elizabeth Moorman, daughter of J. P. 
Moorman, of Hardin county, Kentucky, by whom he had three chil- 
dren, viz. : 

F 1. John Terrell, born in 1844. In the fall of 1861 he went 
to Memphis, and joined Captain Overton's company in Forrest's 
Regiment, and was with Forrest in a gun-boat fight on the Cumber- 
land river. He was taken sick soon afterward at Hopkinsville, Ky., 
of typhoid fever. Just before the battle of Shilo he reported 
himself for duty, joined the infantry, drilled all day on Monday, 
and at night was taken sick and died on Thursday following — the 
3d of April, 1862, and was inhumed at Burnsville, Tishamingo 
county. Miss. , on the Mobile & Ohio Railroad. 

F 2. Jesse Taylor, born 1847 and died 1851. 

F 3. Elizabeth Bunch, born 1849 and died 1850. 

In 1849, Elizabeth, the wife of Dr. Jesse P. Lewis, departed this 
life, and in 1852 he married, as his second wife, Adelia Moorman, 
daughter of J. Moorman, of Breckinridge county, Kentucky. Eliza- 



334 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

beth and Adelia were third cousins. The children by his second 
wife are: 

F 4. William C, born 1854, etc. 

E 9. Captain David Benjamin Lewis, son of David J., was born 
in 1820 in Breckinridge county, Kentuck}^ soon after his father set- 
tled in said county. He is six feet in stature, weighing one hundred 
and seventy pounds, with fair skin, blue eyes, dark hair and of san- 
guine temperament. He is a farmer; sometimes taught school and 
the latter part of his life he practiced medicine. He resides near 
Howell Springs, in Hardin county, Ky. He is a steward in the 
Methodist church and captain of the militia in his county. In 
1839 he married Lucy Moorman, daughter of Achilles Moorman, of 
Hardin county, Kentucky. She was first cousin to Elizabeth Moor- 
man, the first wife of Dr. Jesse P. Lewis. The children of Captain 
David B. Lewis are, viz: 

F 1. Vivian Irving, born in 1841. He belonged to the Confed- 
erate Army and fought faithfully throughout the war, and when 
Johnson surrendered his command was comprised in the escort of 
President Davis. He was wounded at Fort Donelson and sent to 
Nashville just before the surrender of the former. At Dug Gap he 
had his gun cut in two by a ball just in front of his hand when in 
the act of firing. 

F 2. Clinton Augustus, born in 1843; was a soldier in the Con- 
federate Army. He joined the army in August, 1862, and the third 
day after he joined he was captured and taken to Johnson' s Island and 
was exchanged about Christmas at Vicksburg, where he was detained 
awhile on account of sickness. On his way to join his command 
at Chattanooga he spent a very sick night in a stable-loft in the city 
of Jackson, Miss. He was shot through his clothes and his horse 
fell under him at Farmington, Tenn. He had the reins of his bridle 
cut by a ball and his hand slightly wounded in North Carolina, and 
came near dying of typhoid fever just after the battle of Chica- 
maugua. Vivian and Augustus both belonged to the Second Ken- 
tucky Cavalry, first under Forrest, then under Gen. Williams, to the 
close of the war. 

F 3. James Clifford, born in 1845. 

F 4. Jesse Wiufield, born in 1847. 

F 5. John Thompson, born in 1850. 

F 6. Elizabeth Enfield, born in 1852. 

F 7. Martha Ella, born in 1854. 

E 10. Martha Jane, daughter of David J. Lewis, was bom in 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 335 

1822. She was five feet eight inches in height, with fair skin, blue 
eyes and dark hair. In 1838 she married Dr. Wm. D. Owen, son of 
Thomas Owen, of Breckinridge county, Kentucky. Dr. Owen was 
born in 1811. She had eight children and died near Rock Lick, 
in Breckinridge county, Ky. She was an exemplary member of 
the United Baptist church. She lived and died like a Christian and 
was the idol of her sorrowing husband and brothers. She was kind, 
ingenious, conciliating, true and faithful, and elicited the love and 
esteem of all who knew her. 

The following are the names of her children: 

F 1. James Thomas, born in 1839. 

F 2. Ophelia Murrit, born in 1841, and died 1841. 

F 3. Delia Harriet, born in 1842. 

F 4. William David, born in 1845. 

F 5. Lucy Ann, born in 1847. 

F 6. John Lewis, born in 1849; burned to death in 1852. 

F 7. Priscilla Frances, born in 1851. 

F 8. Richard, born in 1853. 

E 11. Thomas Jefferson Lewis, son of David J., was born in 
1824. He is six feet two and one-quarter inches in height, weigh- 
ing one hundred and sixty pounds, with fair skin, blue eyes, dark 
hair and of a nervo-sanguineus temperament. He is a farmer, and 
a member of the Baptist church. He resides near Planters Hall, in 
Breckinridge county, Ky. In 1844 he married Eliza W. Owen, 
daughter of T. G. Owen, of the same county. She was also a niece 
of Dr. Wm. Daniel Owen. 

Thomas J. has the following-named children: 

F 1. Kate, born in 1845; married Edgar Bennett, and had issue, 
viz. : G 1, Guy; G 2, Beulah; G 3, Earle, and G 4, Edgar Bennett; 
post-office, Irvington, Ky. 

F 2. William Watkins, born in 1847; married Lula Millett and 
had issue, viz.: G 1, William Owen; G 2, Thomas J.; G 3, Mary 
J,, and G 4, Eliza W. 

F 3. Lucretia Thomas, born in 1848, and died 1853. 

F 4. Jesse Pitman, born in 1850; married Anna L, Moorman, 
and had issue, viz. : G 1, Lula E., etc. 

F 5. David B., born in 1853; died 1854. 

F 6. Jane Moorman, married Orville C. Callaway, and had 
issue, viz.: G 1, Henry Lewis; G 2, Guerdon; G 3, Raymond, etc. 

F 7. Lizzie T., born in 1857; married Charles F. Heyser. 

F 8. Owen, born in 1860, and died 1861. 



336 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

F 9. James T., born in 1865; married Katie Fisher. 

F 10. Mattie W., married Arthur J. Williams, and had issue, 
viz.: G 1, Ethel. 

F 11. Edgar C. 

E 11. Thomas J., son of David J. Lewis, died in Breckinridge 
county, Kentucky, in 1889, when the following obituary notice 
appeared in a paper published in that county: 

OBITUARY. 

Died at his residence at Long Lick, tliis county, Hon. Thomas J. Lewis, 
in the sixty-fiftli j'ear of his age, of consumption. 

Mr. Lewis was a native of Brecliinridge county, and was known by this 
people from his childhood up. Very early in life he became a member 
of the Baptist church, firmly adhering to its doctrines and principles until 
the close of his earthly probation. Mr. Lewis was united in marriage to 
Miss Eliza W. Owen, sister of Jesse W. Owen, of this county, and Hon. 
W. T. Owen, of Owensboro. The wife of his youth still survives him. 
He was the father of eight children, seven of whom still live. He was 
very dignified and gentlemanly in his bearing — loathing everything little 
or mean. When you stood in his presence you were impressed with the 
idea that you stood in the presence of a gentleman of the first water. He 
was a prudent and thoughtful man, wise and safe in his counsels. His fel- 
low-citizens honored him with their suffrage by electing him to represent 
his native county in the Legislature, where he acquitted himself with 
credit and honor to his country. For several years he had been in declin- 
ing health, and about a year ago he went to Southern California, hoping 
that the climate might be beneficial ; but all in vain. After remaining 
there for several months he returned to the bosom of his family to die. 

His family have the hearty sympathy of all. 

T. J. LEWIS. 

Bro. T. J. Lewis was born in Breckinridge county, Kentucky, April 21, 
1824, and died of pulmonary consumption July 16, 1889. He was baptized, 
upon a profession of faith in Christ, by Elder S. Buchannan, for the Goshen 
Baptist church, in early manhood. He was married, when less than twenty- 
one years of age, to Miss Eliza W. Owen. Bro. Lewis' religious life was 
not one long ovation, but rather one long and hard-fought battle. I was his 
pastor for j-ears, and knew more of his inner life than anyone else 
except his wife. To me he confided his sharp struggles with sin as to no 
other but her. He was never satisfied with his own attainments in the 
divine life. To use his own words as he was nearing the cold waters of 
death and reviewing his life, he "finally became disgusted with himself, 
and thought he had no religion." In the fall of 1888 it was thought a trip 
to California might improve his health. During his stay there he spent 
much of his time in the study of the Bible and in praj'er, and he after- 
ward said that he enjoyed more religion while thus engaged than he had 
done in his life before. Thus the "little hope" he had tried to throw away 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 337 

was fanned into a flame, and he could look away from himself with all hia 
imperfections to Christ and his perfect righteousness and feel secure in 
Him. It was touching to hear him in the last months of his sufferings talk 
of his children — all converted; but he said he deserved none of the credit 
that they were Christians ; that his wife deserved it all under God. Thus, 
the song of his heart was a constant depreciation of himself and an exal- 
tation of others, until it took the sweet refrain: " None of self and all of 
Christ." The great anxiety of his soul for his family, and especially hi& 
boys, was, that they might live nearer to Jesus than he had done, and fill 
their covenant-engagements as church members as they ought. A devoted 
wife and loving children mourn his death ; but they " mourn not as those 
who have no hope," for thej' look with confidence to see him come with 
Jesus in the last day. May the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ sustain 
them in this hour of their grief, is the humble prayer of 

D. DOWDEN. 



22 



338 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



CHAPTEE XIX. 

JOEL LEWIS, SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VA. 

C 7. Joel Lewis, son of David and his first wife, Miss Ter- 
rell, was born about 1730, in Hanover county, Virginia. He emi- 
grated to Albemarle county with his father and others of the family 
about 1750, as the first record of his name is found in deeds of 
gifts of tracts of land on Moore's creek, dated 1750, to William 
Terrell Lewis, David Lewis, John Lewis and Joel Lewis. The 
executors of the last will and testament of David Lewis, Sr., who 
died in Albemarle county, Virginia, in 1779, were Joel Lewis, John 
Martin, James Lewis and Taliaferro Lewis. The subscribing wit- 
nesses to the same were, Stephen Willis, Anna Willis, Morning 
Clarkson, Robert Lewis and William Johnson. 

Joel Lewis finally settled in Spotsylvania county, where he died 
in 1813. He was three times married. His first wife was Mary 
Tureman, by whom he had only one son. His second wife was the 
widow Gordon, whose maiden name was Sarah Chiles, by whom he 
had three children. His third wife was Lucy Daniel, by whom he 
raised three children, making seven in all, viz. : 

D 1. Tureman Lewis, married Polly Davidson. 

D 2. Keilding Lewis, died single, 

D 3. Molly Lewis, died single. 

D 4. Fanny Lewis, married William Estes. 

D 5. Susan Lewis, married Joseph Willoughby. 

D 6. Joel Lewis, Jr., married Frances Goodwin. 

D 7. David Lewis, married Polly Lipscomb. 

D 1. Tureman Lewis, was born about 1755, and resided in Spot- 
sylvania county, Virginia, where he died in 1837. He married Polly 
Davidson about the year 1780, by whom he raised seven children, 
viz.: 

E 1. Mary, born about 1781; married George Taylor. 

E 2. Sarah, born about 1783; married Elija Robbins. 

E 3. Dorcas, married Aquilla Johnson. 

E 4. Frances, married William Johnson, brother of Aquilla. 

E 5. Hulda, married John T. Pendleton. 

E 6. James, married Jane Waller. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 339 

E 7. William T., married Elizabeth Falkner. 

E 1. 3Iary, the oldest child of Tureman Lewis, was born about 
the year 1781. In 1809 she married George Taylor. They lived and 
died in Spotsylvania county, Virginia; he in 1830, and she in 1858. 
They raised ten children, viz. : 

F 1. Eliza Taylor, born in 1810. She was a member of the 
Baptist church, and married, in 1833, William Pruett, her cousin, 
and died childless in Tennessee, in 1837. 

F 2. Mary Taylor, was born in 1812. She is a member of the 
Baptist church; weighs one hundred and thirty-six pounds. She 
never married ; resides near Andrews P. 0., Spotsjivania county, 
Va. 

F 3. Jane 31. Taylor, was born in 1814. She has black eyes, 
dark hair, weighs one hundred and fifty-six pounds, and is a member 
of the Baptist church, and resides, single, near Twyman's Store, 
Spotsylvania countv, Va. 

F 4. Ann Taylor, born in 1816; had gray eyes and weighed one 
'hundred and thirty-two pounds. She was a member of the Baptist 
church, and died single, near Andrews P. 0., Spotsylvania county, 
Va., in 1868. 

F 5. John Taylor, born in 1818; died single in Spotsylvania 
county, Virginia, in 1832. 

F 6. George Taylor, born in 1820; emigrated to Tennessee, 
"where he married. 

F 7. James Taylor, born in 1822. He was a mechanic by trade; 

married a Miss Gilbert; had two children, John and James, 

and died in Kentucky, in 1866. 

F 8. William Taylor, born in 1824; weighs one hundred and 
forty-six pounds. He married, in 1856, the widow of William T. 
Lewis, whose maiden name was Frances Haley, by whom he has 
three children, viz.: G 1, Mary Ella; G 2, Lucy, died, and G 3, 
Isabella. They reside near Twyman's Store, Spotsylvania county, 
Va. 

F 9. Henry J. Taylor, born in 1826; weighs one hundred and 
forty-five pounds; married, in 1854, Mrs. Lucy Ellen Pendleton, 
widow of Edmund B. Pendleton, and daughter of Joel Lewis and 
his wife, Frances Goodwin, by whom he has children as follows: 
G 1, Joel, born 1856; G 2, Maria Durrett, died; G 3, Anna, born 
1860, and G 4, James, born 1860; died 1864. The last two were 
twins. 

Henry J. Taylor's post-office is Spotsylvania C. H., Va. 



340 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

F 10, Waller Taylor, born in 1830; is a mechanic. He emigrated 
to Kentucky in 1858 while single. 

E 2. Sarah, second daughter of Tureman Lewis, was born about 
1783. She married, in 1800, Elija D. Robbins. Mr. Bobbins was 
born in the year 1787; was six feet three inches in height, weighing 
one hundred and eighty pounds, with light hair, blue eyes and fair 
complexion. They lived many years in Spotsylvania county, Vir- 
ginia, where all their children were born. He finally moved to 
Franklin county, Tennessee, where his wife died in 1842. Some 
years after the death of his wife he married Mrs. Mary E. B. Moore, 
widow of Dyer Moore, and daughter of Colonel James Lewis, of 
Franklin county, Joel Lewis, the father of Tureman Lewis, and 
Colonel James Lewis, were half-brothers. Mr. Bobbins had no chil- 
dren by his last wife. Mrs. Sarah Bobbins had six children by 
E. D, Bobbins, viz, : 

F 1. Mary Bobbins, born in 1810, and died single in Spotsyl- 
vania county, Virginia, in 1822. 

F 2. James Bobbins, born in 1812; married, and died in Texas, 
in 1853; left children. 

F 3. Lewis Bobbins, born in 1814; died in Franklin county, 
Tennessee, in 1839. 

F 4. John L. Bobbins, born in 1817; died in Texas in 1855. 

F 5. Jane Bobbins, born in 1819, married Jo. M. Beckley. They 
have ten children, and reside in Franklin county, Tennessee. 

F 6. Joseph Bobbins, born in 1822; resides in Fort Worthy 
Austin county, Tex. 

E 3. Dorcas, daughter of Tureman Lewis, married Aquilla John- 
son. They reside in Spotsylvania county, Virginia, near Andrews 
P. 0. They raised seven children, viz. : 

F 1, Mary Jane, born 1824; married E. J. Spindle in 1846^ 
resides near Andrews P, 0. and has three children, viz. : G 1, John 
Samuel, born 1848; G 2, Virginia Dawson, born 1851, and G 3, 
Willie Emma, born 1854. 

F 2. John C, son of Dorcas Johnson, single, Andrews P. 0. 

F 3. William Johnson, married Sue Duerson, Twyman's Store 
P, 0. 

F 4, James Johnson, married, Williamsburg, Va., P. 0. 

F 5. Bettie Lewis Johnson, married Bob. F. Willoughby, son of 
Mrs. Susan Willoughby (cousins), Andrews P. 0, They had one 
child, who died in 1860. 

F 6. Aquilla, died during the Confederate war. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 341 

F 7. Jacob, married and resides at Williamsburg, Va, 

E 4. Frances, daughter of Tureman Lewis, married William 
Johnson, brother of Aquilla; resides in Spotsylvania county, Vir- 
ginia. They raised seven children, viz. : 

F 1. Ann, married Joe Duerson; resides at Mt. Pleasant P. 0., 
Spotsylvania county, Va. Had one child, G- 1, William Henry, that 
died in infancy. 

F 2. Emily Johnson, married Henry Duerson; have three chil- 
dren, viz. : Gr 1, Mary Ella, married Ed. Smith and had one child, 
viz. : H 1, Malcolm Woodfolk; G 2, Edwena Duerson, and G 3, Ole 
Duerson. 

F 3. Joseph H. Johnson, resides at Louisa C. H., Va. He mar- 
ried Almina Andrews and has four children. 

F 4. Jane Johnson, married B. Holladay; had one child, William 
H., that died. 

F 5. Lewis Johnson, died single. 

'F 6. Thaddeus T. Johnson, near Andrews P. 0., married Caroline 
Waller in 1856. They have four children. 

F 7. Sallie Johnson, single. 

E 5. Hulda, daughter of Tureman Lewis, married John T. 
Pendleton, of Fredericksburg, Va., cousin of Ed. B. Among the 
members of the Pendleton family may be found some of the most 
distinguished men of Virginia. 

John T. Pendleton raised six children, viz. : 

F 1. Bettie, married Thomas Duerson. 

F 2. Martha, died. 

F 3. William, married. 

F 4. James, died in prison during the Confederate war. 

F 5. John, married Margaret Garrett and has children. 

F 6. Battle, married a Miss Alsop. 

E 6. James, son of Tureman Lewis, married Jane Waller and 
has four children, viz. : F 1, Benjamin; F 2, Lucy, died; F 3, James, 
died; F 4, a daughter, died. 

E 7. William T. , son of Tureman Lewis, married Elizabeth 
Falkner. His post-ofHce is Andrews, Spotsylvania county, Va. 
They had eight children, viz. : F 1, Jenny; F 2, Lucy; F 3, Alfred, 
died; F 4, Sallie; F 5, Frederick; F 6, Emma, died; F 7, Harriet, 
and F 8, William T. Lewis, Jr. 

D 2. Keilding, son of Joel Lewis and his wife, Sarah Chiles, 
died single. 



342 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

D 3. Molly, daughter of Joel Lewis and his second wife, Sarah 
Chiles, died single. 

D 4. Frances, daughter of Joel Lewis and his second wife, Sarah 
Chiles, married William Estes. They had nine children. They 
moved to Kentucky. Nothing more is known of them. 

D 5. Susan,, daughter of Joel Lewis and his third wife, Lucy 
Daniel, was born in 1788, and now (1880) resides, a widow, near 
Andrews P. 0., Spotsylvania county, Va. She married Joseph 
Willoughby, by whom she raised three children, viz. : E 1, Littleton; 
E 2, Robert F. , and E 3, Alexander. 

E 1. Littleton, born 1825; resides near Andrews P. 0., Va. 

E 2. Robert F., born 1827; married Bettie Lewis Johnson, 
daughter of Dorcas and Aquilla Johnson (cousins). He resides near 
Andrews P. 0., Va., and has children, viz.: F 1, Tolbert, born 
1859, etc. 

E 3. Alexander, born 1828; is unmarried. 

D 6. Joel, Jr. , son of Joel Lewis, Sr. , married Frances Goodwin ; 
resided in Augusta county, Virginia, where he died in 1854. He 
raised three children, viz. : 

E 1. Ann Eliza, married Wm. H. Chewning. 

E 2. William T., married Frances Haley. 

E 3. Lucy Ellen, married Ed. B. Pendleton. 

E 1. Ann Eliza, daughter of Joel Lewis, Jr., married, in 1848, 
Wm. H. Chewning, Andrews P. 0., Va. They have children, viz. 

F 1. Fanny Lewis Chewning, born 1848. 

F 2. America Ellen Chewning, born 1850. 

F 3. Eliza Jane Chewning, born 1853. 

F 4. William Terrell Chewning, born 1855. 

F 5. Elizabeth Miller Chewning, born 1857. 

F 6. Hiram Kenton Chewning, born 1860. 

F 7, Susan Ann Chewning, born 1862. 

E 2. Wm. T. , son of Joel Lewis, Jr. , married Frances Haley and 
died in Spotsylvania county, Virginia, in 1854, leaving three chil- 
dren, viz.: F 1, Ferdinand, died in the Confederate Army; F 2, 
John, and F 3, William. Post-office, Twyman's Store, Va. 

After the death of Wm. T. Lewis Frances, his' widow, married 
Wm. Taylor, son of George and Polly, her cousin, and resides near 
Twyman's Store. 

E 3. Lucy Ellen, daughter of Joel Lewis, Jr., married, in 1837, 
Edmund B. Pendleton, by whom she had four children. After the 
death of E. B. Pendleton she married her cousin, Henry J. Taylor, 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. o4iJ 

son of Polly and George. They reside at Spotsylvania C. H. , Va. 
She had eight children, viz. : 

F 1. AVm. Stapleton Pendleton, born 1838; resides in Richmond,. 
Va., and is a conductor on the Richmond & Fredericksburg Rail- 
road. He married, in 1856, Martha A. Willoughby, and after her 
death he married, in 1859, Lucy D. Lafong. 

F 2. Rob. Lewis Pendleton, son of Ed. B., was born in 1843. 
He is a farmer and is six feet in height, with dark hair and blue 
eyes. In 1865 he married Laura E. Tinder, by whom he had two 
children, viz. : G 1, John Edmund, born 1867, and G 2, Frances 
Ellen, born 1869, and died 1869. Laura E., his wife, died in 1869. 

F 3. Bettie Fannie, daughter of Ed. B. Pendleton and Lucy, 
born 1848. 

F 4. Mary Eliza, daughter of Ed. B. Pendleton and Lucy, born 
1850. 

F 5. Joel Henrj^, son of Ed. B. Pendleton and Lucy, born 1856. 

F 6. Maria Durrett, daughter of Henry J. Taylor, died in infancy. 

F 7. Anna Katharine, daughter of Henry J. Taylor, born 1860. 

F 8. James Lafayette, son of Henry J. Taylor, born 1860; died. 



344 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



CHAPTEE XX. 

MRS. ANNA WILLIS— JOEL TERRELL, RUTHERFORD COUNTY, 
NORTH CAROLINA. 

C 8. Anna Lewis, daughter of David Lewis, Sr. , and his first wife, 

Miss Terrell, was born in Hanover county, Virginia, in 1733. 

8he was a woman of ordinary size, weighing about one hundred and 
thirty-five pounds, and was endowed by nature with a remarkably 
strong constitution and vigorous intellectual powers. She was never 
confined a day to her bed by sickness in her life. She was raised at 
& time when there were but few schools in the country. By the aid 
of her father, together with her own untiring assiduity and diligence, 
,she acquired a very good English education. Piety, industry, 
longanimity, probity and charity were prominent traits in her char- 
acter. About the year 1750 she emigrated from Hanover with her 
father to Albemarle county, Virginia, where she married, in 1753, 
her cousin, Joel Terrell, Jr. After her marriage they kept a hotel at 
Charlottesville, Va., and among their many boarders was numbered 
Thomas Jefferson, a young lawyer who had just hung out his 
■' ' shingle. ' ' After the death of Joel Terrell, Jr. , her husband, she 
married Stephen Willis. Several of her brothers and sisters having 
■emigrated to the South and West, it was an inducement for her to 
emigrate also, she having bought land of her brother, David Lewis, 
in Rutherford county, North Carolina, to which place she had sent 
some of her negroes before her removal. In 1780 she started for 
her home in the South, and on her arrival at her brother's, Wm. T. 
Lewis', on the Yadkin, in Surry county, North Carolina, in May, she 
heard that the British had captured Charleston, S. C. ; so she 
remained at her brother's until the succeeding fall, when she moved 
to her home in Rutherford county. North Carolina. On her arrival 
at her home she found no one there. She at once concluded that 
the British and Tories had taken off all her negroes, as Colonel Fer- 
guson, a short time previous, had marched through Rutherford 
county. But on her meeting with her friends she found that her 
sister, Mrs. Susannah Mackey, had them hid out in the river hills. 

In order to save his property Stephen Willis was forced to take 
the oath of protection by pledging himself not to raise arms against 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 345 

the King of England ; but at the same time his son Stephen, by his 
first wife, was in the army doing good service for the colonies. 
Stephen Willis's first wife was a sister to Joel Terrell, the first 
husband of Mrs. Anna "Willis. 

Before the Revolutionary war Mrs. Anna Willis was a member of 
the Church of England, but always desired to be immersed. After 
the death of Mr. Willis, her second husband, who was a Presbyterian, 
she was immersed in Broad river on the plantation of her son, 
Joel Terrell, Jr., about three miles southwest of Rutherfordton. 
She used spectacles until she was over ninety years of age. At one 
hundred she could read without the use of glasses, her eyesight hav- 
ing returned. On the morning of her one hundredth birthday she 
presented to her grandson, James 0. Terrell, a copy of the " West- 
minster Confession of Faith," which was printed in old style, bound 
in calf and dressed with the hair on. On the fly-leaf of said book 
she wrote with her own hand as follows: 

" Presented by me to my grandson, James 0. Terrell, February 
14, 1833. This day 1 am one hundred years old. 

" Anxa Willis." 

At one hundred years of age she walked as erect as a girl of six- 
teen, using, however, a walking stalT to prevent her from stumbling. 
Instead of a bonnet she wore a straw hat with a ribbon around it. 

After the death of her husband and her son, Joel Terrell, Jr. , she 
continued to reside with her grandchildren. She resided with Col. 
Arthur Erwin, who married Evalina A. Terrell, her granddaughter, 
until 1834, when Col. Erwin moved to Georgia, after which time she 
resided with William L. Griffin, her grandson, until the day of her 
death, which event occurred on the second of Jul}^, 1835, at the ad- 
vanced age of one hundred and two years, four months and a few 
days. On the morning of the day of her death she arose as usual, 
dressed herself and walked to the fire, but complained of a slight 
dizziness. A cup of coffee was furnished her which she drank, 
and then returned to her bed, lay down and immediately ex- 
pired, almost without a groan or struggle ; apparently without pain 
or sufl:'ering. Thus ended her long and useful career of over five 
score years. 

Her remains were interred by the side of her son in the graveyard 
at her old homestead, near Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Mrs. Anna Willis had ten children by her first husband and none 
by the second. Their names were as follows: 

D 1. Mary Terrell, was born 1755; married Capt. Rob. Adams. 



346 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

D 2. Anna Terrell, was born 1756; married Robert Hackett. 

D 3. Susannah Terrell, was born 1758; married Alex. Gordon. 

D 4. Richmond Terrell, was born 1760; married Cecilia Derra-^ 
cott. 

D 5. Joel Terrell, Jr., was born 1762; married Martha Williams. 

D 6. Frances Terrell, was born 1764; married Chisolm Griffin. 

D 7. Wm. Garland Terrell, was born 1766; died young. 

D 8. Wm. Lewis Terrell, was born 1768; died young. 

D 9. Peter Higgins Terrell, was born 1770; died, twenty-one 
J^^ears of age. 

D 10. Jane Garland Terrell, was born 1772; died a young woman. 

D 1. Mary Terrell, eldest child of Mrs. Anna AVillis by her first 
husband, married Captain Robert Adams, a soldier of the Revolu- 
tion. He belonged to a company of ' ' minute men, ' ' and was under 
Colonel Charles Lynch, of Lynch law memory. 

During the Revolutionary war Colonel Charles Lynch, in order 
to mete out summary justice to the Tories, would never consume 
time by having a court-martial, but whenever he would catch one 
of them in their marauding expeditions he would tie him up to the 
nearest tree and whip him as much as he was able to bear, since 
which time tieing a man to a tree and whipping him is familiarly 
styled giving him ' ' Lynch' s law. ' ' 

Colonel Lynch was a blood relation of the Terrell family, hence 
we find among its different branches many Lynch Terrells. 

Governor Charles Lynch, of Mississippi, was a son of the above- 
mentioned Charles Lynch, of Virginia. 

Captain Robert Adams and his wife, Mary Terrell, died near 
Lynchburg, Va. They had eight children, five sons and three, 
daughters, viz. : 

E 1. Charles. 

E2. William. 

E 3. Christopher. 

E 4. Rev. Joel. 

E 5. Amelia. 

E 6. Robert. 

E 1. Charles Adams, emigrated to Kentucky, was a horse drover 
and would frequently drive horses from Kentucky to Rutherford 
county, North Carolina. He was a bachelor. 

E 2 and 3. William and Christopher, emigrated to Alabama, 
and when last heard from were engaged as boatmen on the Black 
Warrior river. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY, 347 

E 4. Rev. Joel Adams, was a Baptist preacher and was living in 
Virginia when last heard of. 

E 5. Amelia Adams and two other sisters were living in 
Virginia. 

E 6. Robert Adams, was a farmer and emigrated to some of the 
Western States. 

D 2. Anna Terrell, daughter of Mrs. Anna Willis, was born in 
1756. She married Robert Hackett, who survived their marriage 
about six weeks and was drowned in Broad river at Twittysford, a 
few miles from Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Anna had one son and died in Rutherford county, North Carolina, 
in 1837. The name of her son was E 1, Joel Lewis Hackett. 

After the death of his mother he moved to Habbersham county, 
Georgia, to his half-brother, Robert Hackett, and was engaged 
attending to the farm of his half-brother, when he was accidentally 
killed in 1840 by a tree falling on him. 

J. Lewis Hackett was a very worthy young man and bid fair to 
become a useful member of society; but in the midst of life we are 
in death. He had no family. 

D 3. Susannah Terrell, daughter of Mrs. Anna Willis, married 
Alexander Gordon and died childless on Cloud's creek, Oglethorpe 
county, Ga. 

J) 4. Richmond Terrell, son of Mrs. Anna Willis, was a Revolu- 
tionary soldier, and was one of the twenty-two of the Lewis family 
in the battle of King's Mountain. He married, in 1782, Cecilia 
Darracott, of Virginia, had eight children and died in 1856 in Newton 
county, Georgia, aged ninety-six years. The following are the 
names of his children: 

E 1. Thomas Darracott, born 1783; married Sarah Livingston 
and Ann Jones. 

E 2. Joel Lewis, born 1786; married Isabella Reed and Nancy 
Reeves. 

E 3. Jane, born 1789, and died 1801. 

E 4. John B., born 1791; married Orpha World, 

E 5. Elizabeth Overton, born 1794; married Thos. Carter. 

E 6. Nancy, born 1797; married Rev. Jesse Travis, 

E 7. Virginia, born 1799, and died in childhood. 

E 8. Louisa, born 1802; married Richard Hodges. 

E 1. Thomas D. Terrell, son of Richmond, born 1783; married 
Sarah Livingston in 1817, who was born in 1800 and died in 
1828. 



348 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY, 

The second wife of Thomas D. was Ann Jones, whom he married 
in 1828. They reside in Newton county, Georgia. Thomas D. Lad 
six children by his first wife and eight by his second, viz. : 

F 1. William J., born 1818; married his cousin, Celia Carter, in 
1851. She had five children and died in 1860. Her children were 
as follows: G 1, Overton Bass; G 2, Walter C. ; G 3, Julius C, 
died; G 4, Ophelia B. ; G 5, Warren C. 

F 2. Louisa, daughter of Thos. D. Terrell, was born in 1820, and 
married, in 1839, Robert M. Rakestraw, of Newton county, Georgia. 
She had eight children and died in 1889. Her children were: 

G 1. Robert Thos. C, born 1841. He belonged to the Young 
Guards, 3d Georgia Regiment, in the Confederate war, and was noted 
for his bravery and kindness in his company. He was killed in 
battle at Malvern Hill in 1862. 

G 2. Sarah M. E. Rakestraw, born 1844; married Joseph Cook 
in 1885. She had two children — they both died in childhood. Their 
post-office is Social Circle, Walton county, Ga. 

G 3. Mary E. V., born 1847. 

G 4. Harriet Jane, born 1853; married James M. Belcher in 
1869. Mr. Belcher is a man of talents and respectability. He is 
Ordinary of the county of Newton, in Georgia. They have children, 
viz, : H 1, Archibald, born 1870, and is now (1891) at Emory College, 
Oxford, Ga. ; H 2, Robert Thos., born 1875, and died 1887; H 3, 
Alma Pearle, born 1877; H 4, Vera Louisa, born 1881, and died 
1887; H 5, Mary Ethel, born 1882. 

G 5. Louisa C. Rakestraw, born 1850, and married W. 0. B. 
Eason, her cousin, in 1874 and had children, viz. : H 1, Robert C, 
born 1875; H 2, Ashley Wood, born 1876, married Elizabeth Par- 
rett; H 3, Whitmell Thos., born 1878; H 4, Louisa C, born 1880; 
H 5, James M., born 1882; H 6, Kalera, born 1884, and died 1886; 
H 7, Ozie, born 1885; H 8 and H 9, twins, born 1887, and died at 
birth; H 10, Richmond, born 1889, and died 1889. 

G 6. DoUie J. J., daughter of Louisa Rakestraw, born 1856; 
married F. D. Riggers in 1878, of Covington, Ga. They have three 
children, viz.: H 1, Lillian Livingston, born 1880; H 2, R, Louisa, 
born 1886, and H 3, Charles Boy ken, born 1890, 

G 7. Richmond A. S. Rakestraw, born 1859. 

F 3. Elizabeth Overton, daughter of Thos. D. Terrell, was born 
about 1822, and married Ashley Eason, of Alabama, in 1837. Mr. 
Eason died in 1874. They had children, viz. : 

G 1. Whitmell T,, born 1839; killed at Corinth, Miss., 1862. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 349 

G 2. Sarah Elizabeth, born 1841; post-office, Matilda, Tallapoosa, 
Ala. 

G 3. Stephen, born 1843; killed at Corinth, Miss., during the 
Confederate war. 

G 4. Louisa Jane, born 1845 ; post-office, Matilda, Ala. 

G 5. W. 0. B., born 1847; post-office, Starrsville, Newton 
count}', Ala. 

G 6. Ashley Wood, born 1849; Matilda, Ala. 

G 7. Martha Overton, born 1853; Matilda, Ala. 

G 8. George L., born 1855; post-office. Van Alstyne, Grayson 
county, Tex. 

G 9. Kichmond J., born 1857; Matilda, Ala. 

G 10. Isaac E., born 1859; Matilda, Ala. 

G 11. Robert C, born 1861; Matilda, Ala. 

G 12. Mary, born 1862; died in childhood. 

G 13. Sarah, born 1869; Matilda, Ala. 

F 4. Richmond Joseph, son of Thos. D. Terrell, was born about 
1823. He was a soldier in the Mexican war in 1S47, and was badly 
wounded in the first battle in which he was engaged and made a 
cripple for life. In 1850 he married Sarah A. E. Anderson and 
resides in Xewton county, Georgia. They are members of the Bap- 
tist church and have children, viz. : G 1, John Williams, born 1851; 
G 2, Henry Thomas, born 1854; G 3, Robert B. W., born 1857; 
G 4, Louisa Joe, born 1861, and died 1862; G 5, Carrie S. 0., born 
1864. . 

F 5. Lieutenant John Thomas, son of Thos. D. Terrell by his 
second wife, was born in 1829. He was a soldier in the Confederate 
war; was First Lieutenant in a company in the 16th Regiment from 
Newton count}', Georgia, and fell upon the battle-field at Jonesboro, 
Ala., fighting bravely for the Confederacy. 

F 6. Rebecca, daughter of Thos. D. Terrell by his second wife, 
was born about 1831. She married Hampton Taylor and has chil- 
dren, viz.: G 1, John; G 2, Willie; G 3, Celenia; G 4, Frank, etc. 

F 7. George Washington, son of T. D. Terrell, married a lady in 
Florida, leaving one child. He was a Confederate soldier and be- 
longed to the Virginia Army, where he was taken prisoner and con- 
fined at Fort Delaware, where he died during the war. 

F 8 and 9. Franklin and Marion Jones, twin-brothers, sons of 
Thos. D. Terrell, born about 1835. Franklin was a Confederate 
soldier and died in the hospital at Bean's Station, Granger county, 
Tenn. 



350 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

F 10, Sarah; F 11, Joice A., and F 12, Nancy, daughters of 
Thos. D. Terrell. 

E 2. Joel Lewis Terrell, son of Richmond, was born in 1786. 
He resides near Rutledge, Morgan county, Ga. , and was twice mar- 
ried. His first wife was Isabella Reed, who died childless. His 
second wife was Nancy Reeves, b}^ whom he had five children, all 
born in Jasper count}', Georgia, viz. : 

F 1. Isabella, married James McCoy, son of Benjamin, in 1862, 
and is a member of the primitive Baptist church at School Creek, of 
Newton county, Ga. Mr. McCoy was killed at Jonesborough in the 
war. Mrs. McCoy's post-office is Rutledge, Morgan county, Ga. 

F 2. John Lewis Terrell, died at home in 1862, aged seventeen. 

F 3. Martha Cecilia, married Jo. W. B. Calloway, son of Joshua, 
in 1865. They reside in Walton county, Georgia, and have no 
children. 

F 4. Nancy Avery, married Mr. A. W. R. Jackson in 1864. 
They have two children, viz.: G 1, Mamie Isabella, born 1864, and 
G 2, Mattie Celeste, born 1867. 

F 5. Inez, died in childhood in 1854. 

E 3. Jane, daughter of Richmond Terrell, born 1789, and died in 
1801. 

E 4. John B. Terrell, son of Richmond, was born in 1791, and 
died in Jefferson count}", Georgia, in 1867. He married Orpha 
"World, by whom he had six children, viz. : 

F 1 . Minerva, married Mr. Low, and resides in Alabama. 

F 2. Richmond, married Maranda Underwood, Jefl'erson county, 
Georgia. 

F 3. Stephen A., married Linsey Calhoun; post-office, Wadley, 
Jeflferson county, Ga. 

F 4. Nancy, died unmarried. 

F 5. Sarah, married Mr. Underwood, Jeflferson county, 

Georgia. 

F 6. William, died unmarried. 

E 5. Elizabeth Overton, daughter of Richmond Terrell, was born 
in 1794. She married Thomas Carter, had five children and died 
near Lagrange, Troup county, Ga., in 1853. The names of her 
children are, viz. : 

F 1. Cecilia Carter, married her cousin, Wm. J. Terrell, son of 
Thomas D. 

F 2. Jane Carter, married Thomas Hearn and had three chil- 
dren. They reside near Lagrange, Troup county, Ga. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 351 

F 3. Rachel Carter, married William Thomas, Troup county, 
Georgia. 

F 4. Richmond Carter, was drowned when a youth, and 

F 5. James Anthon}' Carter, died j'oung. 

E 6. Nancy, daughter of Richmond Terrell, was born 1797. She 
had but one hand ; was married to Rev. Jesse Travis, a Baptist min- 
ister, in 1818. Their post-office is Conyers, Newton county, Ga. 
They raised six children, viz. : 

F 1. Frances, married Thomas Thrasher; left eight children. 

F 2. Nancy, married James Thrasher; died and left four chil- 
dren. 

F 3. Susan, married Mr. Harper and died childless. 

F 4. Dr. John Travis, married in South Carolina. 

F 5. Dr. Jesse Travis, married Sarah Collins, of Texas, where 
he died, leaving a widow and one child. 

F 6. Dr. A. Campbell W. Travis, after practicing medicine for 
many years, devoted the latter part of his life to curing cancers, 
ulcers, etc., and made quite a reputation in that line. In 1866 he 
married Alice Livingston, of Covington, Newton county, Ga. , had 
three children and died in 1890. The names of his children are, 
viz.: 

G 1. John Livingston, born 1868, graduated at Emory College, 
Oxford, Ga. , and resides at Covington, Newton county, Ga. 

G 2. Wm. Darracott, born 1870; graduated at Emory College, 
Oxford, Ga. ; is studying medicine and makes a specialty of cancer- 
curing. His post-office is Covington, Newton countj^ Ga. 

G 3. Robert Jesse, born 1877, and is now at college (1891). His 
home is with his widowed mother at Covington, Ga. 

E 7. Virginia, daughter of Richmond Terrell, was born in 1799 
and died in childhood. 

E 8. Louisa, daughter of Richmond Terrell, was born in 1802. 
She married Richard Hodges and died at the birth of her first child. 

D 5. Joel Terrell, Jr., son of Mrs. Anna Willis by her first hus- 
band, was born in 1762, in Albemarle county, Virginia. He was the 
third Joel Terrell in a direct line, his father and grandfather being 
of the same name. He was a large man, with very acute perceptive 
faculties; was very sensitive and irascible, but with a very amiable 
disposition. He was never known to correct a child or servant when 
angry. His intellectual faculties were of a high order. In point of 
personal bravery it almost amounted to rashness. To mount a 
vicious horse, to stem the current of swollen streams, to rush with 



352 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

knife in hand upon the stag at bay, or face his man upon the field. 
He was never known to quail or even exhibit the slightest symptom 
of trepidation or fear. 

In early life he was apprenticed to the saddle and harness trade, 
but did not follow it very long. Before he was sixteen years of age 
he espoused the cause of the colonies which then engaged in a war 
with England, and enlisted in a company belonging to Colonel 
Charles Lynch' s regiment. He was detailed as a guard to protect 
Chriswell's lead mines, and to prevent the British and Tories from 
procuring lead from them. He was one of Colonel Lynch' s men 
who executed his order to hang or whip all Tories who were caught 
in their marauding adventures. He was wounded with an ounce 
ball at the battle of Guilford Court House, which penetrated the 
chest and lodged on the diaphragm. It was never extracted, and 
was finally the cause of his death. The ball being at liberty would 
roll over the diaphragm as he would change his position; this 
caused him always to move in a stooping attitude to prevent the ball 
from rolling, which eventually became adhered to his side at the 
margin of the midrib, and remained so for many years, until it waa 
broken loose by an effort of his in trying to jump a ditch; but by his 
resuming his inclining attitude it again became attached to his side, 
and remained so during his life. After he received this wound he 
never experienced a well day; was always subject to syncope, and 
finally, while in a cheerful conversation with a friend, he fainted, 
fell on the floor, and expired in 1819. 

Two days after the battle of Guilford Court House he was taken 
prisoner by some predatory Tories, who carried him to the British 
camps. His brother, Richmond Terrell, belonged to the same com- 
pany, but was not in the battle of Guilford Court House, having 
been detailed the evening before to guard the baggage wagons on 
Troublesome creek. 

Joel Terrell, Jr. , being quite young when he entered the army, 
would become fatigued frequently upon a long march, when his 
cousin. Major Micajah Lewis, would relieve him by carrying his gun 
for him. 

It is said that there were twenty-two members of the Lewis con- 
nection in the battle of King's Mountain who shouldered their arms 
and did service for the colonies in the daj^s that tried men's souls, 
and that there was not a Tory among them. The connection em- 
braced the Lewises, Madisons, Terrells, Hickmans, Musicks, Mackeys, 
Benges, Martins, etc. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 353 

Joel Terrell emigrated with his mother from Virginia about the 
year 1780, to Rutherford county, North Carolina, where he died. 
About the year 1800 he married Martha, daughter of John Wil- 
liams, a Continental soldier, who served in the army throughout the 
entire struggle for independence, and who also died in Rutherford 
county, North Carolina. 

Joel Terrell, Jr., and his wife, Martha Williams, had seven chil- 
dren, viz. : 

E 1. Evelina Anvil, born in 1801 ; married Arthur Erwin. 

E 2. James Orville, born in 1803; married Ermina R. Kilpatrick 

E 3. Matilda, born in 1805; died young. 

E 4. Anna M., born in 1806; died in infancy. 

E 5. John Higgins, born in 1808; died single. 

E 6. Joel Lynch, born 1810; died single, and 

E 7. Frances Maria, born 1812; died in childhood. 

E 1. Evelina A. Terrell, daughter of Joel, Jr., was born in 1801. 
In 1825, in Rutherford county. North Carolina, she married Colonel 
Arthur Erwin, son of James Erwin, of the same county. James 
Erwin married Mary Miller, daughter of General James Miller, a 
soldier of the Revolution, whose wife was Agnes Miller, his cousin, 
whom he married in Ireland. General Miller died also in Ruther- 
ford county. North Carolina. 

After their marriage Mr. A. Erwin resided at the old Terrell 
homestead in Rutherford until 1834, when they moved to Hall 
county, Georgia, and resided near Gainesville until 1836, when they 
moved to Cumming, in Forsyth county, where thej' have been en- 
gaged keeping a hotel ever since. This portion of Georgia was 
known then as the ' ' New Purchase. ' ' When they settled in Cum- 
ming the countrj- was still inhabited by the Indians, who had sold 
their claims to the United States Government, and were actively 
engaged emigrating to the West. 

Mrs. Evelina A. Erwin, her husband and most of her family a-re 
members of the Methodist church. Mrs. Erwin was one among the 
best of women, and her husband is equally as worthy. Soon after 
they located in Cumming he was elected Sheriff of the county, and 
since that time has been honored with a seat in the State Legislature 
three different terms. They had nine children, viz. : 

F 1. Mary Angeline, born about 1826; married G. Dickerson 
Black and died in Atlanta, Ga., in 1858, leaving three children. 

F 2. James Miller Erwin, born about 1828 and died in childhood. 

F 3. William Adolphus, born in 1830. He was principal agent 
23 



354 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

on the Lagrange Railroad. Being in bad health he started to travel, 
thinking it would perhaps be the means of restoring his health. He 
got as far as Colonel Sims, near Ringgold, where he died, unmar- 
ried, in 1853. 

F 4. Martha Elizabeth Erwin, born about 1832. 

F 5. Nancy Walton Erwin, born about 1834. 

F 6. John Terrell Erwin, born about 1836. 

F 7. Andrew Lewis Erwin, born about 1838. 

F 8. Sarah Matilda Erwin, born about 1840, and 

F 9. Julia Evelina Erwin, born about 1842. 

E 2. Captain James Orville Terrell, son of Joel, Jr., was born 
in Rutherford county. North Carolina, in 1803. He was six feet in 
height, weighing one hundred and fifty pounds, with black hair and 
blue eyes. In early life he learned the carpenter' s trade, and was an 
excellent workman. In 1829 he married Ermina Rosanna, daughter 
of William D. Kilpatrick, then of Rutherford county. North Caro- 
lina. After his marriage he settled in the village of Rutherfordton 
and worked at his trade until 1840, when he moved a few miles 
from the village to the Stone Cutter creek, and in 1847 moved to 
Pigeon river, six miles from Waynesville, in Haywood county, N. 
€., whither his father-in-law had moved six years previous. Capt. 
James Orville Terrell never sought or held any office except military, 
and was one among the best military tacticians in the State. He was a 
Presbyterian in sentiment, and died in February, 1880. His wife 
died in 1879 in Haywood county, North Carolina. They had nine 
children, viz. : 

F 1. Jas. Wharey, born 1829; married Elmina Farley. 

F 2. Martha Jane, born 1832; married Jesse M. Byrd. 

F 3. Mary Evelina, born 1834; married L. P. Hargrove. 

F 4. Wm. Stewart, born 1836; was in the Confederate war and 
afterward engaged in merchandising at Sonoma, Haywood county, 
N. C. 

F 5. Louisa Calloway, born 1840. 

F 6. Harriet Eliza, born 1843; married Mr. Evans and died in 
1872, leaving three children. 

F 7. John Lynch, born 1846. He lost an eye in the battle of 
Petersburg, December 25, 1864, during the Confederate war. 

F 8. Joel Montgomery, born in 1850; died. 

F 9. Rev. Lawson Pinckney, born in 1852. He is a Methodist 
preacher of the Holston Conference M. E. Church, South. 

F 1. Colonel James W. Terrell, son of James Orville, was born 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 355 

in Rutherford county, North Carolina, in 1829. At sixteen years 
of age he was sent to Haywood county, North Carolina, to Wm. D. 
Kilpatrick, his grandfather, and apprenticed for three years at the 
tanning business. After the expiration of his apprenticeship he 
worked one and a half years with his grandfather as a joui'neyman. 
In 1852 he went to Quallatown, a trading stand for the Indians, in 
Jackson county. North Carolina, where he erected a tannery for the 
Hon. "\Vm. H. Thomas, who was Indian agent and State Senator from 
this district. He worked about one and a half years in the tan-yard 
himself, after which he only superintended it. In 1853 he married 
Elmina Farley, daughter of Wm. H. Farley, Esq., of Quallatown. 
In October, 1853, he was appointed disbursing agent to the tribe of 
Cherokee Indians yet remaining in this country, which agency he 
continued to hold up to the close of the Buchanan administration. 
In the spring of 1854, while at church, he sustained a heavy pecun- 
iary^ loss in the burning of his dwelling-house. In 1852 he was 
appointed postmaster at Quallatown. "When not engaged transact- 
ing business with the Indians he acted as clerk and book-keeper in 
the store of Mr. Thomas. Shortly after his marriage he purchased 
a farm one and a half miles from Quallatown. In 1856 his wife 
died, childless, of fever, aged twenty years and nearly four months. 
She was a member of the Methodist church, a kind neighbor, an 
affectionate wife, and an humble Christian. 

In 1858 he married, as his second wife, Ann Eliza, daughter of 
Kev. Ulrich Keener, of the Holston Conference M. E. Church, 
South. Mr. Keener was for many years the missionary preacher 
to the Cherokee Indians and Ann Eliza taught the missionary 
school. 

During the absence of Mr. Thomas, Col. J. W. Terrell acted as 
sub-agent for the Indians and transacted all their business, such as 
magistrate, judge, secretary, attorney and general adviser. He is 
a farmer, tanner, postmaster, clerk in a store, chairman of the 
board of superintendents of common schools for the county, ex-officio 
member of the committee for the examination of the qualifications 
of teachers of the common schools, recording secretary of the church, 
teacher in the Sabbath-school, disbursing agent for the United States 
to the Cherokee Indians, deputy surveyor for the county, tax col- 
lector for the beat, Lieutenant-Colonel of the 110th Regiment, North 
Carolina militia, was Quartermaster of the 1st Regiment of Thomas' 
Legion during the Confederate war, and was nominated by the citi- 
zens of his county as a suitable candidate to represent them in the 



356 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

State Legislature, which honor he respectfully declined. Dui-ing 
the Confederate war, although a Quartermaster, he would sometimes 
send off his stores and participate in the fight. On one occasion he 
escaped capture by running through a gap in the enemy's lines just 
as they were closing in on him. He was the last man that got out 
except one, and escaped through a ' ' shower of balls. ' ' In politics, 
he was an old-line Whig, but when Know-Nothingism superseded 
that party he stood aloof from all political connections until the 
Presidential contest in 1860, when he supported 1. C. Breckinridge. 
In religious matters he is of the persuasion of the New School 
Presbyterians, but there being no church of that denomination near 
him he attached himself to the Methodist church, as his wife was a 
member of that church. He is a respectable stump speaker, and his 
business capacities are of a high order. He is looked upon by his 
friends as being quite shrewd and keen, but his wife is a "Keener." 
His post-office is "Webster, Jackson county, N. C. 

They have five children as follows: 

Gr 1. Mary Jane, born in 1859; married Silas L. Teague. 

G 2. Sarah Ermina, born in 1861; married Charles A. Byrd. 

G 3. James Ulrich, born in 1863, and died in infancy. 

G 4. Wm. David. 

G 5. Joel K. 

F 2. Martha Jane, daughter of Captain James Orville Terrell, 
was born in 1832. In 1852 she married Jesse M. Byrd, a farmer 
residing in Jackson county. North Carolina. They are both members 
of the Methodist church and have five children, viz. : 

G 1. Louisa Eveline, born 1853. 

G 2. Ermina Caroline, born 1855. 

G 3. William Francis, born 1858. 

G 4. Laura, born 1860, and 

G 5. Flora, a twin-sister, born 1860. 

F 3. Mary Evelina, daughter of Captain James Orville Terrell, 
married, in 1858, Lawson P. Hartgrove, a farmer living on Pigeon 
river, in Hayward county. North Carolina. Mary E. is a member of 
the Presbyterian church. They have children, viz. : G 1, Amanda, 
born 1859; G 2, Nancy, born 1860, etc. 

F 4. William Stewart, son of Captain J. Orville Terrell, was a 
clerk in the store of A. B. Herron & Son, of Waynesville, N. C. 
He was a First Lieutenant in Company A of the 1st Regiment of 
Thomas' Legion. 

F 5. Louisa Callaway, daughter of Captain Jas. Orville, died at 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 357 

two years of age aud was buried in Rutherford county, North Caro- 
lina, by the side of her grandmother. 

F 6. Harriet Eliza. 

F 7. John Lynch. 

F 8. Joel 3Ioutgomery, 

F 9. Lawson Pinckney. 

E 5. John Higgins, son of Joel Terrell, Jr., was born in Ruth- 
erford county. North Carolina, in 1808; was a farmer, but about 
1838 he engaged in the grocery business in Cumming, Ga., where 
he died of cramp colic in 1841. He never married. 

E 6. Joel Lynch, son of Joel Terrell, Jr. , lived in Rutherfordton 
N. C. In early life he learned the carpenter's trade. He was also a 
good cabinet workman, with talents that would command respect any- 
where. He was imbued with a mechanical genius that would insure 
fortune if not fame. But few young men had brighter prospects 
before them in early life to accumulate wealth and fame than he had. 
None knew him but to love him. He died single in Rutherford 
county, North Carolina. 

D 6. Frances Terrell, daughter of Mrs. Anna Willis, was born 
in 1764. She married a man by the name of Chisolm Griffin and 
died in Georgia. They had one son by the name of E 1, Wm. L., 
who married a Miss Sutton and died in Rutherford county, North 
Carolina. They had eight children, viz. : 

F 1. George, married a Miss Tanner. 

F 2. Mary Ann, married a Mr. Green. 

F3. Vine}'. 

F 4. Caroline, married a Mr. Daniels. 

F 5. Nancy; F 6, Martha; F 7, Lorain, and F 8, James Griffin. 

D 7, 8, 9 and 10, William Garland, William Lewis, Jane and 
Peter Higgins, the four youngest children of Anna Willis, all died 
in early life. 

The Terrell family in this country is of Anglo-Norman origin, and 
■was founded in England by Sir Walter Tyrell, a Norman knight, 
about A. D. 1066, when William the Conqueror took possession of 
that country. The ancient orthography of the name was Tyrell, 
Terrail, Tyrrell, Terrill, etc. 

Three brothers, William, James and John Terrell, of English 
birth, during the reign of Oliver Cromwell, passed over into Ireland, 
from thence to America, sometime between the years of 1665 and 
1700, an 1 settled in the colony of Virginia. William Terrell was 
Ijorn about 1635; had three sons, viz. : 1, Henry; 2, David, Sr., born 



358 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

about 1670, and 3, James. They and their descendants lived in. 
Gloucester, Hanover, Caroline, Spotsylvania, Campbell and Albe- 
marle counties of Virginia, and in the northern counties of North 
Carolina. From there they emigrated to the South and West. There 
is a tradition that the ' ' three brothers ' ' were sent to Virginia by 
King James the Second, of England, about A. D. 1687, as explorers 
and huntsmen for the crown, and that they were each awarded for 
their services a royal grant of fifteen hundred acres of land in the 
counties of Hanover, Caroline and King George. 

Lynch M. Terrell of Atlanta, Ga., is engaged tracing up the 
Terrell family and designs publishing, in book form, the result of 
his researches. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 359" 



CHAPTEE XXI. 

MRS. ELIZABETH MARTIN, OF CLARK COUNTY, KY. 

C 9. Elizabeth Lewis, daugtiter of David Lewis, Sr., by his third 
"wife, Mary McGrath, was born in Albemarle county, Virginia, in 
1754. After the death of her father and mother she resided with 
Mrs. Elizabeth Taylor, the wife of James Taylor, of Orange county, 
Virginia. The maiden name of Mrs. Elizabeth Taylor was McGrath, 
and was a sister to Mary McGrath, the mother of Elizabeth I ewis. 
When James Taylor married her she was a Mrs. Lewis, the widow, 
perhaps, of John Lewis, brother of David, as it appears from the 
records of Hanover county that John died before his father. 
James Taylor belonged to the same family of Taylors to which 
Zachary Taylor, President of the United States, belonged. Elizabeth 
Lewis was about five feet four inches high, with black hair and 
eyes, and fair skin. While in the prime of life she was said to be 
very handsome, and was one among the best of women. 

Mrs. Wash, the wife of Judge Wash, of St. Louis, Mo., alluding 
to her grandmother remarked that, " If she was a fair specimen of 
the Lewis family, it was a name to be proud of." She had a fine 
mind and retained her intellectual capacities well to the last. She 
had great firmness of purpose, and by her courage and cheerfully 
bearing the privations incident to a settlement of a new country, 
she prevented her husband from moving back to Virginia from Ken- 
tucky, when he proposed doing so, that she and the family might be 
placed in greater safety. Their' s was an outside settlement, and 
Indians had camped on the place three weeks before they moved to 
it; but had been so hotly pursued by parties from Boonesboro and 
Strode' s Station, that they never returned except to plunder and 
murder. During the first year or two after their settlement in Ken- 
tucky there was scarcely a week ever passed from March to Decem- 
ber without some one being killed by the Indians along the border 
settlements. They seldom ever came in the winter. 

This settlement was six miles north of Boonesboro, four miles 
west of Strode' s Station, six miles northeast of Boone's Station; 
and all north of this was a wilderness, until you reached Kenton's 
Station, some sixty miles off, near the Ohio river, where Maysville 



360 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY, 

now stands. The Indians would seldom risk a general battle, but 
acted in accordance with the advice of their celebrated chief, Corn- 
stalk; would go into the settlements in companies of six or eight 
and attack the houses of those who had settled away from the 
stations and forts, and would waylay the paths and kill the persons 
passing. The expeditions of the whites in pursuit of them would 
frequently result only in destroying their villages and crops ; for the 
Indians would generally desert their villages upon the approach of 
the Kentuckians, then hang on their flanks and rear, and shoot the 
stragglers as they passsed. Kentucky was so thickly overgrown 
with cane that it afl^orded the Indians fine hiding places, and it also 
afforded the settlers opportunities of escaping when pursued by the 
Indians. 

In 1775, Elizabeth Lewis married Major John Martin, of Albe- 
marle county, Virginia, in which county he was born in 1749. He 
was a son of Captain Thomas Martin, and grandson of John 
Martin, of Virginia. When a young man he acted as Deputy 
Sheriff for some years in said county. Upon the commencement of 
the Revolutionary war, he volunteered in a company called " Minute 
Men, ' ' who held themselves in readiness to march against the enemy 
at a minute's warning. He was First Sergeant of said company, 
but it was not long before he was promoted to a captaincy. Owing 
to the scarcity of doctors he was necessitated to inoculate his men 
for the small-pox. They were stationed beyond a creek at a house 
used as a hospital, about a mile from his residence. He kept a suit 
of clothes in a hollow stump on the side of the creek upon which 
his men were stationed. He would visit his sick soldiers in those 
clothes, and on his return he would strip, wade the creek, wash him- 
self, put on his home suit again and return to his family. He was 
at Charlottesville with two hundred men under his command when 
the British colonel, Tarleton, and his troops visited that place. 
There were a large number of muskets and a quantity of ammunition 
at Charlottesville, where the Legislature was then in session; but 
that honorable body debated and debated, whether they should let 
out the public arms, until Tarleton came in sight, when Major Mar- 
tin dismissed his men for want of arms, after having cut down 
the banks of the river at the fords, so as to make them eight feet 
perpendicular, and having his men placed upon the river so that 
they could fire on the British as they were crossing. Tarleton 
entered Charlottesville without opposition, dispersed the Legisla- 
tive Assembly, came very near capturing Thomas Jefferson, the 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 361 

•Governor, destroyed all the arms and public stores, and left in 
triumph. 

At the siege of York, Captain Martin for his bravery was pro- 
moted to the rank of Major. During this siege he spent fourteen 
thousand dollars of his own (Continental) money. For the washing 
of a shirt he paid one hundred dollars, and so on in proportion for 
everything he purchased. He lived a few years in Amherst county, 
Virginia. After peace was made in 1784, he emigrated with his 
family to Kentucky, and lived four years in what is now Jessamine 
county. In 1788 he moved and settled in what is now Clark county, 
where he spent the remainder of his life. He took an active part 
as Major of the Kentucky militia during the Indian wars of that 
State, and was in service in what is now Ohio, under General Arthur 
St. Clair, during that unfortunate expedition against the Indians in 
1791 ; but having been detailed to Fort Hamilton, where Cincinnati 
now stands, to bring on four hundred more men, who had been 
ordered to rendezvous there, he was not in that unfortunate battle 
of the 4th of November, which terminated so disastrously to the 
American arms. He was the first Sheriff of Clark count}', Ken- 
tucky, and was for many years afterward one of the judges of the 
Court of Quarter Sessions of said count}', until 1798, when he 
resigned his office and retired to private life. His occupation was 
that of a farmer. He was five feet ten inches in height, of strong 
muscular frame, weighing about two hundred pounds, with florid com- 
plexion, red hair, blue eyes and very fair skin. He was a man of great 
€nerg3' and indomitable courage. He was a first cousin to William 
Clark, who accompanied Meriwether Lewis in his exploring expedi 
tion to Oregon in 1804, and was also first cousin to General George 
Rogers Clark, whose name is so intimately connected with the 
early history of Kentucky, and after whom Clark county was 
named. 

About the year 1798 he made a profession of religion, and 
attached himself to the Methodist-Episcopal church, of which he 
continued a zealous and consistent member up to the time of his 
death. He died in Clark county in 1837, and his wife in the same 
house in 1838. 

Major John Martin was a cousin to General George Rogers Clark 
and General William Clark, who accompanied Meriwether Lewis to the 
Pacific ocean. Meriwether Lewis and General William Clark were 
cousins. 



362 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

The following are the inscriptions to be found on the head-stones 
of their graves : 



MAJOR JOHN MARTIN 

Is buried here. 

Born March 20, 1749 ; 

Died in his eighty-ninth year. 



ELIZABETH, 

Wife of 

Major John Martin, 

Is buried here. 



Near the center of the graveyard there also stands a monument 
erected to their memories with the following inscriptions upon it: 



MAJOR JOHN MARTIN, 

An officer of the Revolution, 

Born in Albemarle countj', Virginia, 

March 20, 1749 ; 

Died December 3, 1837. 



ELIZABETH, 

Daughter of David Lewis 

And wife of Major John Martin, 

Born 1754 in Albemarle county, Virginia ; 

Died 1838. 



They raised eight children, viz. : 

D 1. Thomas, born in 1776; died single. 

D 2. Mary Ann, born in 1778; married J. W. Buckner and 
Colonel Richard Taylor. 

D 3. John Lewis, born in 1779; married Catharine Blanton and 
Mrs. Massie, nee Helen Bullitt. 

D 4. James Taylor, born 1783; died single. 

D 5. George Madison, born 1785; died single. 

D 6. Robert Brooks, born 1788; married Susan Pearson, Mrs. 
Eubank, nee Eliza Nicholas, Mrs. White, nee Wood, and Mary 
Crutcher. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 363 

D 7. Dr. Samuel Da vies, born 1791; married Elizabeth Taylor. 

D 8. Eliza Catherine, born 1798; married Nath. P. Taylor. 

D 1. Thomas Martin, son of Major John, was born in 1776. He 
was only eight years old when his father moved from Virginia to 
Kentucky, yet he had learned at that time the multiplication table 
up to forty times forty, all of which had been taught to him by his 
mother. He was a very promising young man, but died single in 
ISO-t. 

D 2. Mary Ann, daughter of Major John Martin, was born in 
1778 in Albemarle county, Virginia. When a child about six or 
seven years old she got lost in the woods in Kentucky soon after her 
father moved to that State and remained out all night. Wolves and 
bears were very abundant at that time, and the wolves frequently 
howled near her during the night. The next day some two hundred 
persons of the vicinity turned out to hunt for her; she was found in 
the evening by Colonel Crockett. 

In 1794 she married John Washington Buctner, Sr., in Clark 
county, who survived their marriage only a few years. After the 
death of J. W. Buckner, Sr. , she married Colonel Richard Taylor, 
son of Commodore Richard Taylor, grandson of George Taylor, 
great-grandson of James Taylor, Jr., and great-great-grandson of 
James Taylor, Sr. , who emigrated from England to America. 

Colonel Richard Taylor was for many years Sergeant to the Court 
of Appeals. He was an energetic business man. For many years 
before his death he was much afflicted from the effects of a wound 
he received in his hip in the Indian wars while under the command 
of General James Wilkinson ; and in consequence of the kindness 
and attention shown him by the General at the time he named a son 
after him. 

After the death of Colonel Taylor she removed to her father' s in 
Clark county and lived there until 1838, when she went to Lexing- 
ington, Ky., where she resided until her death, which occurred in 
1853. She was a very pious and orderly member of the Methodist 
church. Her remains were deposited in the graveyard at Lexington. 

She had two children by her first and four by her second husband, 
viz. : 

E 1. Elizabeth Buckner, married Rev. Thos. P. Dudley. 

E 2. John W. Buckner, married Catherine G. Crockett and Mar- 
garet Fletcher. 

E 3. Lewis Martin Taylor, never married. 

E 4. James Wilkinson Taylor, married Louisiana Simms. 



364 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

E 5. Catherine B. Taylor, married Moses B. Morrison, and 

E 6. Matilda Taylor, died in childhood. 

E 1. Elizabeth Buckner, was born in Clark county, Kentucky, 
in 1795; married Rev. Thomas P. Dudley, a merchant at Winches- 
ter and cashier of the Winchester Bank. She had two children, 
viz. : 

F 1. William, who died in infancy, and 

F 2. John W. , who was born in Winchester in 1816; married 
Harriet McDonald, of Lexington, Ky. ; was a farmer and lived in 
the neighborhood of Lexington until 1855, when he sold his farm 
and removed to Missouri. He has three children, viz. : 

G 1. Alice; G 2, Thomas P., and G 3, Mary. 

E 2. John W. Buckner, Jr., son of Mary Ann, was born in 
Clark county, Kentucky, in 1798. He married, in 1820, Catherine 
G. Crockett, daughter of Colonel Anthony Crockett, and niece of 
the memorable Colonel David Crockett, who was for many years 
member of Congress from Tennessee, and was killed at the battle of 
the Alamo fighting for Texan independence. .By Catherine G. he 
had nine children. She died in 1844, and in 1846 he married Sarah 
Margaret Fletcher, by whom he had one child. John W. Buckner, 
Jr., lived in Arkansas a few years until about 1842, when he moved 
to Mississippi. He again returned td Arkansas and (in 1858) is 
living near Barfield Point, in Mississippi county. Ark. 

The following are the names of his ten children, viz. : 

F 1. Mary Ann, born 1821; married Foster G. Finley in 1843 
and died in 1844. 

F 2. Elizabeth M., born in Tennessee 1823; married Wm. J. 
Jones. 

F 3. William E., born 1825; married Fanny Young. 

F 4. Richard T., born 1827. 

F 5. Catherine Crockett, born 1830. 

F 6. John Washington, born 1832. 

F 7. Anthony Crockett, born 1834. 

F 8. James Lewis, born 1836, and died 1855. 

F 9. Overton G., born 1839, and 

F 10. Mary Allen, by second wife, born 1850. 

F 2. Elizabeth M. Buckner, married, in 1842, Wm. J. Jones, of 
St. Francis county, Arkansas. She has children as follows: 

G 1. John J., born 1843. 

G2. Eliza J., born 1845. 

G 3. Sally, born 1848. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY, 365 

G 4 aud 5. Twins, Anna, and one not named, born 1855. 

F 3. William E. Buckner, married Fanny Young, of Arkansas, 
in 1847, and has children as follows: 

G 1. Martha, born 1848; G 2, James G., born 1850; G 3, Bet- 
tie, born 1851, aud G 4, Helen M., born 1854. 

E 4. James Wilkinson Taylor, son of Mary Ann, married 
Louisiana Simms, lived in Frankfort, Ky. , and succeeded his father, 
Colonel Richard, as Sergeant to the Court of Appeals of Kentucky. 
He was an active business man, died in Frankfort aud left two very 
promising boys: F 1, Richard Cleves, and F 2, James Wilkinson, 
Jr., both of whom died in 1853. His widow married J. Baker, a 
merchant of Frankfort, had two children, Stanley and Mary, and 
died in 1853. 

E 5. Catharine B. Taylor, daughter of Mary Ann, married 
Moses B. Morrison. They lived some j^ears in Frankfort, Ky. He 
merchandised for many years in Lexington, Ky. , until about 1857, 
when he moved to Keokuk, la. She had ten children, viz. : 

F 1. Richard; F 2, James; F 3, Edwin; F 4, Mary; F 5, Moses 
B. ; F 6, Catharine; F 7, Lilla Augusta; F 8, Helen Martin; F 9, 
Isola, and F 10, Ida, 

D 3. John Lewis Martin, son of Major John, was born in Albe- 
marle county, Virginia, in 1779, and was named after his uncle, 
John Lewis, of the same count}^ who was a favorite of his sisters. 
He was five feet eleven inches high, with black eyes and hair, and 
weighed about two hundred pounds. He was a very extraordinary 
man in his quickness of calculating. When books were kept in 
pounds, shillings and pence, he could add up the three columns at 
once as quick as he could move his hand up the column, at the rate 
of about four seconds to the page. He was raised a farmer. 

About the year 1802, he married Catharine Blanton, and lived a 
few 3"ears upon a farm in Clark county, Kentucky. He then moved 
to Lexington, was appointed clerk of the Kentucky Insurance Bank, 
and afterward cashier; but not approving the management of the 
bank, he resigned about 1817. For some time after this he kept a 
broker's office in Lexington, but after the death of his wife he 
moved to Louisville, K}'., in 1831. In 1834 he married Mrs. Massie, 
whose maiden name was Helen Bullitt, by whom he had no children. 
He kept a farm near Louisville, Ky. , in which city and on this farm 
he spent his summers ; and on a cotton farm in Mississippi, opposite 
to Arkansas Citj^ Ark. , he spent his winters for many years before 
his death. He outlived all his children and died in Louisville, 



366 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Ky., in 1854. He and all the deceased members of his family are 
buried in Lexington. He and his wife were members of the Meth- 
odist church. 

John L. Martin raised six children by his first wife, Catharine 
Blanton, viz. : 

E 1. Orville, married Sarah Sneed. 

E 2. Nancy Oliver, married John F. Anderson. 

E 3. Patsy, married Garnett Duncan. 

E 4. John Hinde, died single. 

E 5. Charlotte, married Dr. Ritchie; died without issue. 

E 6. Catharine, died a 3'oung woman, unmarried, of consumption. 

E 1. Orville Martin, married Sarah Sneed, of Frankfort, Ky. ; 
had only one daughter: F 1, Charlotte, and died. 

F 1. Charlotte, his daughter, married Colonel Christopher Irvine 
Field, of Boliver county, Mississippi, in 1846. She died in 1850, 
leaving but one child, a daughter, born in 1849. 

Gr 1. Patsy, her daughter, resides at Richmond, Madison county, 
Ky. She married Brutus J. Clay, Jr. 

Patsy Clay died in 1891, leaving two sons and three daughters. 

E 2. Nancy Oliver Martin, born about 1805; married John F. 
Anderson, a merchant of Louisville, Ky. She died in 1836, leaving 
three children, viz. : 

F 1. Catharine, born in 1826; married Thomas S. Kennedy, 
educated at Transylvania University, Lexington, Ky. , for a merchant 
of New Orleans, La. ; now residing at Crescent Hill, Jefferson 
county, Ky. , and has six children, viz. : 

G 1. Pattie, born in 1854; married James P. Helm, a lawj'er of 
Louisville, and son of Governor John L. Helm. They have four chil- 
dren, viz. : HI, Kennedy; H 2, Kate; H 3, Inda, and H 4, James. 

G 2. Sidney A., daughter of T. S. Kennedy, born in 1848; mar- 
ried David M. Rodman, a lawyer of Louisville, son of Dr. Rodman, 
and a cousin of Governor Eli Murraj^ of Utah, Governor Critten- 
den, of Missouri, and Logan Murray, of United States National 
Bank, N. Y., etc. Mrs. Rodman has four children, viz. : H 1, Kate; 
H 2, Pattie; H 3, Lee, and H 4, Kennedy. 

G 3. Nannie Martin, daughter of T. S. Kenned}', born in 1859; 
married, in 1881, James E. Gaither, a lawyer, once residing at 
Elizabethtown, Ky. , now at Louisville. They have one son, Thomas. 

G 4. Emily, daughter of T. S. Kennedy, born in 1860; married 
in 1881, Maxwell Sharp Barker, a lawyer of Louisville, whose fam- 
ily is from Hopkinsville, Ky., and Clarksville, Tenn. His grand- 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 367 

father, Solomon P. Sharp, was assassinated in 1820, by Beauchamp, 
at Frankfort, Ky. Emily Barker has two children, Carrie and Max. 

Gr 5. Thomas Worsley, son of T. S. Kennedy, born in 1861, and 
married Margaret Willard, in 1891. 

G 6. Orville A., son of T. S. Kennedy, born in 1867; married 
Eugenie Ferrell, and has one child. Dr. Orville A. Kennedy is Pro- 
fessor of Science in Central University, Richmond, Ky. All of 
Catharine Kennedy's children have white complexions, brown hair 
and blue eyes. 

F 2. Orville Anderson, born in 1828; married Caroline Timber- 
lake, of Paris, Bourbon count}^, Ky. They had but one child, viz. : 
G- 1, Mary M., born in 1852, after which Caroline, his wife, died, 
in 1855. He then visited the ancient city of Rome, in Italy, where 
he also died in 1857. 

Gr 1. Mary M. Anderson, married Meriwether Lewis Clark, and 
has three children, Churchill, Caroline and Bee. 

F 3. Patsy D. Anderson, born in 1831; married Colonel Richard 
Ten Broeck, in 1857, in Liverpool, England. . He is a lawyer by pro- 
fession, and a citizen of New York; and she was a citizen of Ken- 
tucky. He is the owner of fine stock, and is the representative of 
the American turf in England, and has won many valuable prizes 
with his horses. 

We copy the following sketch from Bell's Life, London, viz. : 

TEN BROECK'S WINNINGS IN ENGLAND. 
We present herewith copious tables setting forth the result of the late 
racing campaign in England in a pecuniary point of view. Among the win- 
ners for the j'ear, we find the name of Mr. Ten Broeck prominent. He 
stands credited with $15,745, of which $6,475 was won by Prioress, $2,200 
by Babylon and $1,000 by Woodburn. The balance was won by his English 
purchases, Eclipse, Barbarity, Miwosa and Orlanda. The above sums in- 
clude Mr. Ten Broeck's winnings in "stakes" alone. What he may have 
pocketed in the way of bets, of which oflHcial record is never made, is left 
to conjecture, but that it was beyond his winnings in "stakes," those who 
know his shrewdness in everything that pertains to the turf, and have 
watched his success in the different matches in which his horses have been 
engaged, will not, we are certain, for a moment doubt. The heaviest win- 
ner during the season was Sir Joseph Hanley, who fobbed, in stakes alone, 
$61,000. Mr. Merry stands next, with some $58,000, and several others 
with $30,000, each, follow. 

E 3. Patsy Martin, daughter of John L., married Garnett Dun- 
can, an eminent lawyer of Louisville, Ky. , and had but one child, 
viz. : F 1, Henry Blanton Duncan, born in 1827. She died in 1828. 



368 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



Henry Blanton was a lawyer by profession, and was elected as a 
member of the Legislature from the city of Louisville, Ky. , in 1857. 
At the commencement of the war, in 1861, between the United States 
and the "so-called Confederacy," he raised a regiment and was 
elected its Colonel, and served awhile as a Colonel in the Confed- 
erate Army at Harper's Ferry and other places. He was afterward 
employed by the Confederate Government as an engraver and 
printer of Confederate money at Columbia, S. C, where he was 
stationed when Sherman made his raid through South Carolina. 
General Sherman made his house his headquarters during his stay 
in Columbia. He was nominated for Vice-President on the ticket 
with Charles 0' Conner. 

Colonel H. Blanton Duncan married Mary T. Atkinson, in 1853, 
and has children as follows: 

G 1. Mary Atkinson, born 1854; G 2, Pattie M., born 1857, died 
young — died about 1874; G 3, Jessie, died an infant — died about 
1874; G 4, Georgia, died, aged eighteen years; G 5, Catharine, born 
1864, married Thomas Lewis and they now reside (1891) in Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

E 6. Charlotte Martin, daughter of John L. , married Dr. Ritchie, 
of Philadelphia; had one child, when she and her child both died. 
Dr. Ritchie lived in New Orleans, and died at an old age greatly 
beloved and respected. 

D 1. Thomas Martin, D 4, James Taylor Martin and D 5, George 
Madison Martin, sons of Major John Martin, all died single. The 
following is the epitaph found on the tombstone that marks the spot 
where they repose: 



THOMAS, 
JAMES TAYLOR 

AND 

GEORGE MADISON, 
First, third and fourth sons of 
Major John Martin, 
Died from twenty-two to twenty- 
eight years old. 



D 6. Robert Brooks Martin, son of Major John, was born in 
Clark county, Kentucky, in 1788; was five feet ten inches high, with 
light hair, blue eyes, fair skin and weighed about one hundred and 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 369 

eighty-five pounds. He was a man of great strength and activity; 
was very industrious and energetic in the fore part of his life. He 
served two tours in the Northwestern Army during the War of 1812: 
one under Captain Simpson in a company of mounted men com- 
manded by General Tupper as their chief officer. They traversed 
the Northwestern territory, but found all the Indian villages deserted. 
During this tour they had no battle, though some few of the men 
were killed by Indians. His second tour was in a company of 
mounted men under Captain Clark, commanded by Governor Isaac 
Shelby as their chief officer. Rob. B. Martin removed to Monroe 
county, in Missouri, where he died in 1849. 

The following is a copy of the inscription upon his tombstone : 



ROB. B. MARTIN, 

Son of Major John Martin, 

Born February, 1788 ; 

Died February, 1849. 



He was married four times. His first wife was Susan Pearson, 
whom he married in 1808, and by whom he had seven or eight chil- 
dren. She died in 1818. His second wife was Mrs. Eubanks, whose 
maiden name was Eliza Nicholas, whom he married about 1820, and 
by whom he had four children. His third wife was Mrs. White, 
whose maiden name was Wood, by whom he had no children. His 
fourth wife was Mary Crutcher, by whom he had two children. The 
following are the names of his children that lived to be grown ; he 
had several besides that died j'oung: 

E 1. Ann Eliza, daughter of Rob. B. Martin, born 1810; married 
Francis B. Moss, a hardware merchant of Winchester, Ky. ; had no 
children; is now a widow living in Winchester. 

E 2. George, died single, twenty-four years of age. 

E 3. James Pearson, born 1814 in Clark county, Kentucky; went 
to Missouri with his father in 1825. He learned the saddler's trade, 
but is now a farmer in Monroe county, Missouri. He married Mary 
Jane Fowler and has children as follows: F 1, Francis Moss, born 
1854; F 2, Sarah Elizabeth, born 1856, etc. 

E 4. John Martin, son of Rob. B., born about 1816; learned the 

saddler's trade, but is now a farmer. He went to Missouri, came 

back to Kentuckj" and lived some time in Winchester, then returned 

to Missouri and married Elizabeth Bowling in Missouri and has 

24 



370 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

children as follows: F 1, George Francis, born 1842; F 2, Susau 
Pearson, born 1845; F 3, Sarah Jane, born 1848, married Thomas 
C. Hunter, of Estill City, Ky. ; F 4, Emily Mary, born 1850; F 5, 
Josephine, born 1852. 

E 5. Emily, daughter of Rob. B., died young. 

E 6. Samuel Pearson, born 1820 in Clark county, Kentucky, son 
of Rob. B., is a Methodist preacher in Missouri. 

E 7. Thomas, son of Rob. B., died young. 

E 8. Robert, son of Rob. B. by his second wife, has for some 
years been a guide across the plains to California. He is said to be 
one of the best guides upon the route. He never carries weapons, 
and has the confidence and friendship of all the Indians on the route. 

E 9. Sarah, daughter of Rob. B., born 1826; married Thomas 
C. Hunter; no children; reside in Estill City, Ky. 

E 10. Nancy, daughter of Rob. B. by his fourth wife, born 1833; 
married Samuel Bowling; has children, viz. : F 1, Julia, etc. 

E 11. Julia, daughter of Rob. B., born about 1835. 

D 7. Dr. Samuel Davis Martin, son of Major John, was born in 
1791 in Clark county, Kentuck}-, on the farm, where he died in 1881. 
He was five feet ten inches high, black hair and eyes, wiih fair skin, 
weighing about one hundred and eighty- five pounds and of a strong 
muscular frame. He was educated mostly in Clark county and at 
the Transylvania University. 

He commenced the study of medicine in 1809 with Drs. Mitchell 
and Davis, of Frankfort, Ky., and in 1811 he went to Lexington and 
continued the study of medicine with Dr. Ridgely, of that place. 

In 1812 he married Elizabeth W. Taylor, in Winchester, Ky., 
daughter of Jonathan Taylor and his wife, Ann Berry. She was a 
relative of General Zachary Taylor and James Madison, late Presi- 
dents of the United States. For further information in regard to 
the Taylor family the reader is referred to another page of this work. 

In 1814 he became a member of the Methodist church, his wife 
being a member of the same church. In 1814 and 1815 he attended 
medical lectures at the Transylvania University. In 1815 he 
located at Winchester, Ky., and practiced medicine until 1825, when 
he removed to his farm and continued the practice for ten years, 
when he tried to give it up that he might devote more of his time 
and attention to his farm ; but after trying some years, he being so 
frequently called on to visit the sick, that he determined again to 
give his chief attention to the practice of his profession, and at sev- 
.enty-five years of age was actively engaged in his profession, riding 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 371 

on horseback, and was capable of doing as much business almost as 
at any time of his life. He never was a candidate for any office, 
and the only public station he ever held was that of surgeon to the 
36th Regiment of Kentucky militia. He devoted a great deal of 
his time and attention to the importation and raising of fine blooded 
stock, and took many premiums at the agricultural fairs by the 
exhibition of the same at Lexington, Paris, Richmond, Winchester, 
l^icholasvilLe and Frankfort, Ky. 

D 7. Dr. Samuel D. Martin and his wife, Elizabeth W. Taylor, 
had fourteen children, viz. : 

E 1. John Sydner, born 1813 and died 1827 of lock-jaw. 

E 2. Dr. George Taylor, born 1814; married Mary Eleanor Mott 
in 1839. 

E 3. Sarah Ann, born 1816; married Stanley F. Tebbs in 1840. 

E 4. Elizabeth Lewis, born 1818; married Josia A. Jackson 
in 1886. 

E 5. Samuel Taylor, born 1819; married Ann Eliza Jones in 1839, 

E 6. James Gibson, born 1821; married Hester Atkins in 1855. 

E 7. Wm. Jonathan, born 1823; died 1825, of whooping 
cough and measles. 

E 8. Mary Susan, born 1825; died 1845, of pneumonia. 

E 9. Mildred Catharine, born 1827 ; married Frank P.Hord in ] 848. 

E 10. Charles Thomas, born 1829; died 1833, of inflammation 
of brain. 

E 11. Francis Robert, born 1831; married Bettie Bailey in 1856. 

E 12. Rachel Davis, born 1833. 

E 13. Boy, born dead 1836; never named. 

E 14. Helen Bullitt, born 1838; married B. F. Buckner in 1863. 

Elizabeth, wife of Dr. Sam D. Martin, died in 1864, and he died 
in 1881, when the following obituary notice appeared in a Kentucky 
paper: 

DR. S. D. MARTIN. 

Dr. Samuel Davis Martin, one of the oldest and, in his day, most useful 
citizens of Central Kentuclvy, died at his home in tliis county last Saturday 
night between 13 and 1 o'clocl\;. 

He was bom where he died on the 17th day of Januarj^ 1791, and, con- 
sequently, was in the ninety-first year of his age. Kentucky, when he 
came into the world, was a county of Virginia, and after the new Common- 
wealth was created this was a part of the county of Fayette. And thus it 
was that Dr. Martin, although never resident beyond the present bounds 
of Clark, yet lived in two States and two counties of this State. He was 
the son of Maj. John Martin, a Revolutionary soldier, who came to Ken- 



372 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

tucky in 1781 from Albemarle county, Virginia. His mother was Eliza- 
beth Lewis, who was an aunt of Lewis, of Lewis and Clarlv's expedition. 
His father, had eight children, six of whom were sons, viz.: Thomas, 
George, James, John L., Robert and the Doctor. His sisters were Mary,, 
who married Gen. Dick Taylor, of Frankfort, and Eliza, the wife of N. P. 
Taylor, of St. Louis. 

The Doctor graduated from the medical department of the Transyl- 
vania University, and, it is said, rode from home whilst a student there, 
when there were no fences between his house and Lexington, and never 
missed a lecture. At the age of eighteen he joined the Methodist church, 
and ever afterward led a consistent, pious, godly life. His membership 
was always at Ebenezer, and no man during his day took more interest in 
the prosperity and welfare of his church. 

With the exception of a few years spent in Winchester, the Doctor 
passed his life on the farm where he died. His practice was very large so 
long as he was able to meet its requirements, and extended throughout and 
beyond the bounds of the county. The poor never called on him in vain, 
and he did an immense amount of work for charity's sake. Up to a very 
short time before his death, he continued to go to see some of his sick 
neighbors, who were anxious to have the benefit of his wisdom and experi- 
ence. He took much interest in agricultural matters, and in 1839, together 
with Hubbard and J. P. Taylor, imported a lot of Shorthorn cattle. They 
were Beauty, by Laurel (2181) ; Jessy, by Plenipo (4724) ; Leonida, by Red 
Simon (2499); Sprightly, by Fitz Roslyn (2026), and the calf, Rosalie, by 
Cadet .(1770). 

Shortly after this he began to gather the materials for an American herd 
book, and did much valuable work in preserving pedigrees, but the cares 
of his profession prevented its completion. 

The Doctor took much interest in meteorology, and for more than forty 
years sent reports to the department at Washington. 

He contributed frequently to the medical journals, and was a close 
observer and good talker. When twenty-one years of age, he married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Jonathan Taylor, of this county. They had four- 
teen children, eleven of whom lived to maturity. His wife has been dead 
about seventeen years, and was a model woman. His funeral was preached 
Sunday afternoon by Rev. S. S. Pentz at his late home. It is strange to 
think that one who lived here before Kentucky was a State should have 
been among us only a few days ago. Few men have lived better or more 
useful lives than Dr. Martin. Always temperate and industrious, just in 
his dealings with his fellows and peaceably inclined, he had the warmest 
affection of his family and the most unbounded confidence of all who knew 
him. The Doctor v,'as never an aspirant for popular honors, but 
" High worth is elevated place; 'tis more; 

It makes the past stand candidate for thee; 

Makes more than monarch, makes an honest man. 

Tho' no exchequer it commands, 'tis wealth: 

And though it wears no riband, 'tis renown: 

Renown that would not quit thee, tho' disgraced, 

Nor leave thee, pendent on a Master's smile." 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY, 373 

E 2. Dr. George Taylor Martin, son of Dr. Samuel D., was bora 
in Clark county, Kentucky; studied medicine with his father; grad- 
uated at the Transylvania University; settled in Union county, 
Kentuck}', to practice medicine; married Mary Eleanor Mott la 
1839 and had the following children: F 1, Samuel, died; F 2, Eliza- 
beth, born 1842; F 3 and 4, George Armstead and Mary C, twins, 
born 1844; F 5, Sarah Gibson, born 1848. George Armstead was 
drowned in Trade water, in Union county, in 1854. 

Dr. George T. Martin died suddenly while on a visit at Louis- 
ville, Ky., in 1850. 

E 3. Sarah Ann Martin, daughter of Dr. Sam. D., was born ia 
Winchester, Clark county, Ky. ; is a member of the Methodist 
church; married Stanley F. Tebbs in 1840. In 1856 they located 
in Clark county, Kentucky. Mr. Tebbs has been a merchant and 
farmer. He is an energetic business man. They have the follow- 
ing children : 

F 1. James Daniel, born 1841, and died 1846. 

F 2. Elizabeth Martin Tebbs, born 1844 in Clark county, Ken- 
tucky. She married David Pruitt in 1863 and has children, viz.: 
G 1, Stanley, born 1865, and G 2, Richard Hickman. 

F 3. Samuel G. Tebbs, born 1847; F 4, George Gibson Tebbs, 
born 1849; F 5, Mary C. Tebbs, born 1851, and F 6, Stanley F. 
Tebbs, born 1854. 

E 4. Elizabeth Lewis Martin, daughter of Dr. Sam. D., was born 
in Winchester, Clark county, Ky. ; married Josiah Ashhurst Jackson, 
Sr., of Clark county, in 1836; lived a few years in Clark county, purr 
chased an interest in the Red River Iron Works in Estill county and 
lived at the forge or furnace in said county until 1852, when he 
moved to Winchester. They have the following-named children : 

F 1. Samuel Grant, born 1838 in Clark county, Kentucky; was 
in the Southern Arm}'; was taken prisoner in southern part of Ken- 
tucky- or Tennessee and paroled. He married, in 1868, Mary T. 
Taylor, daughter of Hubbard B. Taylor. 

F 2. George Martin, born 1840; married Fannie Cornwell 1864; 
was a captain in the Northern or Federal Army, but resigned. Has 
children, viz. : Joseph, born 1867, etc. 

F 3. Elizabeth Gibson, born 1842. 

F 4. Mary Susan, born 1845; married Rob. A. Wash; has chil- 
dren as follows: G 1, Frank Hord, born 1867, etc. 

F 5. Sarah Stanley, born 1847. 

F 6. Josiah Ashhurst, Jr., born 1851 in Estill county, Kentucky; 



374 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

was murdered in November, 1865, by a boy -named John Dawson. 
The two boys had gone out hunting together; he was shot from 
behind twice with a pistol and in the arm and side with a shotgun, 
and then thrown into Red river, where he was found a few days 
afterward. Dawson was arrested for the murder and put upon his 
trial in Powell county, Kentucky. 

F 7. Frank Hord, born 1860. 

Mrs. Elizabeth L. Jackson is a pious and exemplary member of 
the Methodist church. Her husband, Mr. Josiah A. Jackson, Sr., 
died in October, 1863, occasioned by exposure on a trip through the 
mountains in company with the retreating Federal Arm}-. He did 
not belong to the army, but thought it necessary to leave home when 
the Confederate forces came into Kentucky. 

E 5. Samuel Taylor Martin, son of Dr. Sam. D. , was born in 
Winchester, Ky. , and is a farmer; was married to Ann Eliza, 
daughter of Thomas Ap. Jones, of Clark county, in 1839. They 
reside in Missouri. He and his wife are both members of the Meth- 
odist church. They have ten children, viz. : 

F 1. George Thomas, born 1841; was in the Confederate service 
during the whole war. He belonged to King' s Battery, Armstrong' s- 
Brigade of Jackson's Division of Cavalry. He married Mary Fran- 
cisco in Missouri. He resides in Saline county. Has children as 
follows: G 1, George Samuel, born 3867, etc. 

F 2. Samuel Davis, born 1843; was aid to General Marmaduke 
during the Confederate war. He died in Saline county, Missouri, in 
1868, of consumpl^on. 

F 3. Frances Tasker, born 1845; married Geo. Francisco; has 
children as follows: G 1, George Thomas, born 1868, etc. 

F 4. Charles Gibson, born 1847; F 5, Elizabeth Fauntleroy, born 
1849; F 6, Mary Davis, born 1852; F 7, Francis Taylor, born 1854; 
F 8 and 9 (twins), Sarah C. and Helen, born 1857; F 10, Hester, 
born 1862. 

E 6. James Gibson Martin, son of Dr. Sam. D. , was born in 
Winchester, Ky. ; went as a volunteer to Mexico during the Mexican 
war; returned and went to Missouri, located his land warrant he 
received in consequence of his services in the Mexican war in Cass 
county, Missouri. In 1855 he married Hester Atkins. On the 
account of his participation in the rebellion he was banished from 
Missouri to Kentucky, and then from Kentucky to north of the Ohio 
river. After the close of the war he returned, and is now living at 
the old homestead in Clark county, Kentucky. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY, 



375 



E 9. Mildred Catharine Martin, daugliter of Dr. Sam. D. , is a 
member of tlie Metliodist cliurcli; married Frank P. Hord in 1848, 
a farmer. Tliey are living in Cincinnati, 0. , where he is interested 
in a wholesale boot and shoe store under the name and style of 
Apple & Co. 

E 11. Francis Robert, son of Dr. Sam. D., married Bettie Bailey 
in 1856; is a citizen of Saline county, Missouri. During the war of 
of 1861 he espoused the cause of the South; joined the Southern 
Army; was taken prisoner, and after being confined some time in 
Alton, 111., and being very sick was paroled and returned to Ken- 
tucky. He died in 1868 in Missouri. He has the following-named chil- 
dren: F 1, Samuel Gibson; F 2, John Bailey; F3, Rachel Davis, born 
1860; F 4, Eliza Wash, born 1863; F 5, Hardin Bailey, born 1865, 
and F 6, Francis, born 1867. 

E 14. Helen Bullitt, daughter of Dr. Sam D., married, in 1863, 
Major B. F. Buckner, a lawyer of "Winchester, Ky. He was a Major in 
the Federal Army, but resigned shortly after his marriage. He is 
now (1866) a member of the Legislature of Kentucky. The names 
of their children are as follows: F 1, Maurice M. , born 1864, and 
died 1865; F 2, Elizabeth Martin, born 1866, etc. 

D 8. Eliza Catharine Martin, daughter of Major John, was born 
in Clark county, Kentuck}*, in 1798; was an exemplary member of 
the Methodist church. She married Nathaniel Pendleton Taylor, son 
of James Taylor, who married Ann Pendleton. Nath. P. Taylor was 
a cousin to Colonel Richard Taylor, who married Mrs. Mar}' Ann 
Buckner, the sister of Eliza Catharine Martin. Nathaniel P. Taylor 
lived in Jefferson county, Kentucky. They had only two children: 

E 1. Laura, who died in infancy, and 

E 2. Eliza Catharine Lewis Taylor, who married Judge Wash. 

D 8. Mrs. Eliza Catharine Taylor, died in 1819 at the residence 
of her father, Major John Martin, shortly after the birth of her sec- 
ond child. She was interred in the family burying-ground. The 
following is a copy of the epitaph upon her tombstone : 



IN MEMORY OF 

ELIZA CATHARINE TAYLOR, 

Youngest child of 

Major John and Elizabeth Martin, 

And wife of 

Nath'l P. Taylor, 

Born April 28, 1798; 
Died July 28, 1819. 



376 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

E 2. Eliza Catharine Lewis Taylor, daughter of Eliza Catharine 
and Nath. P. Taylor, was born in Jefferson county, Kentucky, in 
1819; is a member of the Episcopal church; married Judge Robert 
Wash about 1837 and lived in and near St. Louis, Mo. She had the 
following children: 

F 1. Elizabeth Wash, born in St. Louis, Mo., in 1838; married 
John Y. Page, a lawyer of St. Louis, Mo., and has children, viz.: 
Gr 1, Eliza Wash Page, born 1859. 

F 2. Robert Ashley Wash, born 1840. 

F 3. William Wash, born 1842. 

F 4. Pendleton Wash, born 1844; was at school in Virginia when 
the War of 1 861 commenced. He joined the Confederate Army and 
was killed near Richmond, Va. 

F 5. Julia Wash, born 1846. 

F 6. Virginia Wash, born 1848. 

F 7. Clark Christopher Wash, born 1850, and 

F 8. Edmonia Wash, born 1852. 

Judge Robert Wash died at St. Louis, Mo., in November, 1856. 

The following obituary notice appeared in the St. Louis Ketvs 
shortly after his death: 

DEATH OF JUDGE WASH. 

St. Louis lost one of her best and most esteemed citizens on Sunday in 
the death of Judge Robert Wash. He was an able jurist and an upright 
man. He came to Missouri from Virginia wliile this State was a Territory, 
and has been one of its brightest ornaments until the daj' of his death. 

Mrs. Wash and»her three children were in Winchester, Ky., in 
1860, boarding with Mrs. Moss. 

THE TAYLOR FAMILY IN PART. 

A 1. James Taylor, Sr., came from Carlisle, England, in 1658, 
and settled near the Chesapeake Bay, in Virginia, where he died in 

1698, leaving five sons and several daughters: 
B 1. Jane Taylor, born December 27, 1668. 

B 2. Mary, born in 1670; married H. T. Pendleton and Ed. 
Watkins. 

B 3. James, Jr., born in 1675; married Martha Thompson, in 

1699. They raised four sons and five daughters in part, as 
follows : 

C 1. Frances, born in 1700; married Ambrose Madison, father 
of James Madison, Sr. , and grandfather of James Madison, Jr., 
President of the United States. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FxVMILY. 377 

C 2. Martha, boru in 1702; married Larkin Chew. 

C 3. James, born in 1704; married Alice Thornton and Mrs. 
Elizabeth Lewis, nee McGrath, the widow of John Lewis, the young- 
est brother of David Lewis, Sr., of Albemarle county, Virginia, who 
married her sister, Mary McGrath, as his third wife. 

C 4. Zachary Taylor, the grandfather of President Taylor, was 
born in 1707. He married Elizabeth Lee, and left posterity, in 
part as follows: 

D 1. Hancock, son of Zach. , of 1707, was at Pittsburg, Pa., in 

1769, in company with his brother, Colonel Richard, and was killed 
by the Indians not far from where Frankfort, Ky. , now stands. 

D 2. Edmund, was also in Pittsburg in 1769. 

D 3. Colonel Richard Taylor, was born in 1744; married in 

1770, Sarah Strother, in 1779, and was the father of President Zach. 
Taylor, et al. , viz. : 

E 1. Hancock, married Miss E. Hord and Hannah Lewis. 

E 2. General Zachary, President of United States, was born in 
Orange county, Virginia, in 1784. He married Miss M. Smith, by 
whom he had four children, viz. : 

F 1. Ann, married Dr. Robert C. "Wood. 

F 2. Sarah K. , married Jeff Davis, President of Southern Con- 
federacy. 

F 3. Elizabeth, married Colonel Bliss. 

F 4. Richard, was a General in the Confederate Army. 

C 5. George Taylor, son of James and Martha Thompson, was 
born in 1711; was twice married; first to Rachel. Gibson, by whorn 
he raised eleven sons, seven of whom bore commissions in the Rev- 
olutionary Army. His second wife was Mrs. Conway. 

C 6. Tabitha, daughter of James and Martha, born in 1713; 
married Mr. Wild. 

C 7. Hannah, daughter of James and Martha, born in 1718; 
married R. Thomas. 

Issue of George Taylor and Rachel Gibson, marked D. : 

D 1. Lieutenant James Taylor, born in 1739; married Ann Pen- 
dleton, and was the father of Nathaniel Pendleton, who married 
Eliza Catharine Martin. 

D 2. George, born in 1741. 

D 3. Lieutenant Jonathan Taylor, Sr., born in 1742; married 
Ann Berry, in 1766, and died in Clark county, Kentucky. 

E 1. Major Jonathan Taylor, Jr., son of Lieutenant Jonathan 
and Ann Berry, was a Major in the United States Army, and was in 



378 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

the battle of St. Clair's defeat, and was afso in General Wayne's 
last campaign against the Indians. 

F 1. Elizabeth, daughter of Major Jonathan Taylor, Jr., mar- 
ried Dr. Sam D. Martin, son of Major John Martin, a Revolutionary 
soldier, and grandson of Thomas Martin, of Albemarle county^ 
Vii'ginia. 

D 4. Edmund, son of George Taylor and Rachel Gibson, born in 
1744; married Sarah Stubbs. 

D 5. Colonel Frank Taylor, born in 1747. 

D 6. Commodore Richard Taylor, son of George and Rachel, 
born in 1749; married Catharine Davis, and was the father of Colo- 
nel Richard Taylor, who married Mrs. Mary Ann Buckner, daughter 
of Major John Martin. 

D 7. Lieutenant John Taylor, born in 1751; was taken prisoner 
during the Revolutionary war, and died on board of a British 
prison -ship, in the Harbor of New York. 

D 8. Major William, born in 1753; married Miss Hord and 
Miss Coats. 

D 9. Dr. Charles, born in 1755; married Sarah Conway. 

D 10. Lieutenant Reuben, born in 1757; married Rebecca Moore. 

D 11. Captain Benjamin, born in 1759, and 

D 12. George Conway. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEAVIS FAMILY. 379 



CHAPTEE XXII. 

COLONEL JAMES LEWIS, OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, TENN. 

C 10. Colonel James Lewis, son of David by his third wife, Mary 
McGrath or Mrs. Hart, was born in Albemarle county, Virginia, in 
1756. When the American Revolution commenced he was among 
the first to espouse the cause of the colonies, and to shoulder his 
gun and march to her defense. He first joined Captain Charles 
Lewis' company in April, 1775. (See Albemarle in 1775, on 
another page). He served throughout the Kevolutionary war ; was 
in all the principal battles — was at Brandywine, Trenton, Princeton, 
White Plains, Grermantown, Yorktown, etc. He was with Washing- 
ton when the army crossed the Delaware on that memorable cold 
day — the 26th of December, when the army was left in a destitute 
and deplorable condition, when they marched from White Marsh to 
Valley Forge, over rough and frozen ground, where they might 
have been traced by the blood from the bare and mangled feet of 
the soldiers. He, with many others, was taken prisoner at German- 
town, and was confined in the prison at Philadelphia nine months, 
where his suffering was almost indescribable. It being in mid- 
winter they were half-clothed, half-fed, without fire and nothing but 
a straw bed upon which to sleep. The officers in command would 
call them to the prison walls and make them catch in their hat the 
hot soup upon which they were fed, and designedly pour the hot. 
soup over their hands and arms so as to scald them. 

Taliaferro Lewis, the son of John Lewis and his wife, Sarah 
Taliaferro, was in the same prison at the same time. He and his uncle, 
Colonel James Lewis, would hug each other's feet, time about, to 
prevent them from freezing. There was an old lady who would 
bring them a little food each day, until they took the prison fever 
and were unable to answer to their names. They recovered, how- 
ever, at length, from their sickness, and devised a plan by which 
they might make their escape from the dungeon in which they were 
confined. They undermined the wall of the prison, through which 
many of the soldiers made their escape. When it came to the time 
when Colonel James Lewis and his newhew, Taliaferro Lewis, 
should make their escape, they stealthily approached the hole under 



380 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

the wall, and were in the act of crawling out, but just as the}^ were 
about to emerge from the submural passage, to their great disap- 
pointment, as they looked up they beheld a British officer standing 
on the outside with a drawn sword in his hand, watching the aper- 
ture under the wall, and ready to cut off the head of any prisoner 
who should attempt to make his escape. They both hastily ran back 
and threw themselves upon their straw bed and feigned sleep, so 
that when the officer came in to examine the condition of the prison, 
it was with much difficulty that he could arouse them from their 
deep slumber. Colonel James Lewis was at Yorktown and witnessed 
the surrender of Lord Cornwallis. In speaking of that memorable 
event, he remarked that, "that was the happiest day of his life." 
During Jefferson's administration, James Monroe was sent as Min- 
ister to France. He reposed so much confidence in Colonel Lewis, 
that Mr. Monroe, on leaving the United States, left all his unsettled 
business in his hands to attend to during his absence. On the 
return of Mr. Monroe, he found his business all wound up, ' ' better, ' ' 
he said, " than he could have done it himself." 

Col. James Lewis was, in a true sense of the word, a fair speci- 
men of " Virginia hospitalit}'. " He was a member of the Episco- 
pal church, was a farmer and kept a hotel several years at Charlottes- 
ville, Ya. His fund of anecdotes was almost inexhaustible. He had 
l)lue eyes, dark hair and fair complexion ; when young he was quite 
spare-made and walked very erect, but in his old age he weighed 
about two hundred pounds. His height was six feet one and a half 
inches. He was twice married. His first wife was Luc}", daughter of 
John Thomas, of Albemarle county, Yirginia, by whom he had 
eleven children. They were married in 1779; she died in 1825. 
His second wife was Mary C. Marks, whom he also married in Albe- 
marle count}-, Yirginia, in 1826, by whom he had no children; 
she died in 1858. He and his children were all born in Albemarle 
count}'. In 1811 he moved from Albemarle county to Franklin 
county, Tennessee, where he died in 1849. 

In 1886 his only living child, Mrs. Mary E. B. Bobbins, of 
Franklin county, Tennessee, visited the grave of her father. She 
found only a small piece of a large tombstone which had been broken 
to pieces by the Federal soldiers during the late Confederate war. 
Upon the piece which she found was the following inscription. The 
balance was all lost: 

"He was an officer in the old Revolutionary war, and was one of 
General Washington's forlorn hope at the battle of Brandj-wine." 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 3S1 

Colonel James Lewis aud his first wife, Lucy Thomas, had thir- 
teen children, but raised only eleven. His children were as follows: 

DL Sarah Thomas, born in 1781; married Wm. Patton and 
Stephen Carter. 

D 2. Tipton, born in 1783; married Frances Hickman and Phebe 
Thomson. 

D 3. Capt. James Wilson, born in 1785; married Martha 
Figuers. 

D 4. 1st Mary, born in 1788; married James Brenham and died. 

D 5. Maria Madison, born in 1790; died, single, 1812. 

D 6. Capt. Cornelius Norbourn, born in 1793; married Mary 
Figuers. 

J) 7. Thomas Moore Jefferson, born in 1795; married Caroline 
Childress and Elizabeth Robertson. 

J) 8. John Thomas Washington, born 1799; married Eliza 
McKenny and Mrs. Cherry. 

D 9. David Claiborne, born in 1800; married Civil Wiggs. 

D 10. Ann Eliza Monroe, born in 1803; married Judge Rob. Z. 
Hawkins. 

D 11. 2d Mary Elizabeth Brenham, born in 1805; married Capt. 
Dyer Moore and Elijah D. Robbins and is alive in 1891. 

D 1. Sarah Thomas Lewis, was born in 1781. Her stature was 
five feet six inches, with light hair, blue eyes and fair complexion, 
weighing about two hundred pounds. She was an exemplary mem- 
ber of the Methodist church. She was twice married ; first to Wm. 
Patton, who died in Lincoln county, Kentucky; secondly to Hon. 
Stephen Carter, who represented Jackson county, Alabama, several 
sessions in the State Legislature. Mr. Carter died at the residence 
of James Moore in Marshall county, Alabama. Mrs. Sarah T. 
Carter had three children by Mr. Patton and six b}' Mr. Carter aud 
died at Bellefonte, in Jackson county, Ala., in 1835. The names 
of her children were as follows: 

E 1. Robert Patton, died in 1824. 

E 2. Maria Patton, married Wm. Lewis. 

E 3. Lucy Patton, married Timothy Root. 

E 4. Mary Elizabeth Brenham Carter, married Rev. Wm. 3IcN. 
Harris. 

E 5. James Lewis Carter, married Jane Finley. 

E 6. Catharine P. Carter, married Elija Hansboro. 

E 7. Sarah Jane Carter, married Presley George. 

E 8. Nancy Carter, married Jas. H. Moore. 



S82 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

E 9. Jefferson Carter, married Sarah Lee and Mary Hines. 

E 2. Maria Patton, married Wm. Lewis, of Lincoln county, 
Kentucky, where they reside. They have children. 

E 3. Lucy Patton, married Rev. Timothy Root and resides at 
Tuskeega, Ala. Their children are as follows: 

F 1. Mary, married a Presbyterian minister, and died; F 2, Rob- 
ert; F 3, William, died; F 4, Lydia, married a Mr. Williams and 
resides at Tuskeega, Ala. 

E 4. Mary E. B. Carter is a member of the Methodist church 
and married Rev. Wm. McN. Harris, of Lockhart, Tex. She has 
children, viz.: F 1, Temple; F 2, Sarah; F 3, Benjamin, etc. 

E 5. James Lewis Carter, married Jane Finley and died at 
"Bellefonte, Jackson county, Ala. They have children, viz. : F 1, 
Stephen ; F 2, William ; F 3, John ; F 4, Sarah, etc. 

E 6. Catharine P. Carter, married Elija Hansboro, a lawyer of 
Austin, Tex. The}^ have no children. 

E 7. Sarah Jane Carter, married Presley George, of Austin, 
Tex. Their children are : F 1, Catharine, died; F 2, Nancy, died, etc. 

E 8. Nancy Carter, married James H. Moore, a merchant, and 
died in Marshall county, Alabama. Her children were: F 1, Eliza- 
beth, etc. 

E 9. Jefferson Carter, was a Methodist. He married Sarah Lee, 
of Kentucky, and Mary Hinds, of Marshall county, Alabama. He 
had two children by the first and five by the last wife, viz. : F 1, 
Frank ; F 2, James ; F 3, Byram ; F 4, Carroll ; F 5, Claiborne, etc. 

D 2. Tipton Lewis, son of Col. James, was born in 1783. He 
was a small man, with light hair and blue eyes. He served in the 
tirmy under Greneral Jackson in the war with the Creek Indians, and 
was in the battle of the Horse Shoe, and was also with General Jack- 
son in the great battle of New Orleans against the British in the 
War of 1812. He was twice married; first to Frances Hickman, 
daughter of Paschal, of Frankfort, Ky. ; second to Mrs. Phebe 
Thompson, of West Tennessee. He died, childless, near Poca- 
hontas, Randolph county, Ark., in 1844. 

D 3. James Wilson Lewis, son of Col. James, was born in 1785. 
His height was about six feet one and a half inches, with light hair, 
Tblue eyes and fair complexion. He was a lawyer by profession and 
yvtxs a member of the Masonic fraternity. He married Martha Fig- 
ners about the year 1814, daughter of Major Figuers, of Wilson 
county, Tennessee. Major Figuers was a gentleman of high stand- 
ing and great respectability. J. Wilson Lewis died, childless, in 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 383 

Wilson county, Tennessee. His widow married a Mr. Helm, 

of Wilson county, Tennessee. 

D 4. Mary Lewis, daughter of Col. James, was born in 1 788. 
She was a small woman, weighing about ninety-five pounds, with 
dark hair and eyes and fair complexion. Her height was about five 
feet five inches. She was a member of the Presbyterian church. 
She married James Brenham, a merchant, by whom she had one 
child, Elizabeth. She and her child both died about 1805, and Mr. 
Brenham died near Orleans, Orange county, Ind., leaving no living 
posterity. 

D 5. Maria Madison, daughter of Col. James Lewis, was born 
about 1790; was about five feet six inches in height, with light 
blue eyes and fair complexion. She died, single, at her father's, 
in Franklin county, Tennessee, in 1812. 

D 6. Capt. Cornelius Norbourn Lewis, son of Col. James, was 
born in 1793. He was a small man, with light hair, blue eyes and 
fair complexion. He served as a captain in the war with the Creek 
Indians under General John Coffee and General Andrew Jackson. 
He was under General Coffee at the battle of the Horse Shoe. Gen- 
eral Jackson had ordered Coffee not to attempt to assault the 
breastworks of the Horse Shoe on the account of its great strength, 
for fear of losing too many of his men ; but through strategem and 
the aid of a friendly Indian, he succeeded in capturing the fort. 
Capt. C. Norbourn Lewis was the third man that mounted the 
breastworks. He was sent back to Tennessee as a recruiting officer 
and raised a regiment in Wilson and the adjoining counties. He was 
with Generals Coffee and Jackson at New Orleans in the War of 
1812 with England, and assisted in gaining that brilliant victory so 
signally achieved by the American arms at New Orleans, La. 

He married Mary Figuers, daughter, of Major Figuers, of Wilson 
count}^, Tennessee, in 1814. He had two children, both of whom 
died in infancy. In 1835 he died at the residence of his father in 
Franklin county, Tennessee. 

D 7. Thomas Moore Jefferson Lewis, son of Col. James, was 
born in 1795. He was about six feet one and a half inches in height, 
with light hair, blue eyes and fair comptexion. He was a lawyer 
by profession; married Caroline Childress in Tuscaloosa, Ala., where 
he died, childless, in 1820. His widow married Judge Pickens, of 
Eutaw, Ala. 

D 8. John Thomas Washington Lewis, son of Colonel James, 
was born in 1799. He was about six feet one inch in stature, with 



384 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

light hair, blue eyes and fair complexion. He was a member of the' 
Methodist church. He was married three times. His first wife was- 
Elizabeth, daughter of Wm, Robertson, of Madison county, Alabama, 
by whom he had two children. His second wife was Eliza McKen- 
ney, whom he married near Fort Towson, in the Choctaw nation, 
west of Arkansas, by whom he had seven children. His third wife 
was a Mrs. Cherry, by whom he had no children. He died near 
Fort Smith, in Sebastian county, Ark. His wife survived him and 
is living within three miles of Fort Smith. J. T. Washington Lewis 
had nine children, viz. : E 1, Mary; E 2, William R. ; E 3, James; 
E 4, Alfred; E 5, Joel; E 6, John; E 7, Simona; E 8, Louisa, and 
E 9, David Claiborne. 

E 1. Mary, daughter of J. T. W. Lewis, married Octavius 
Spencer, of Jefterson county, Alabama. During the Confederate 
war they emigrated to Jackson Parish, La., where she died in 1873, 
leaving six children, viz.: F 1, William, was in the Confederate 
Army and died, single, after the war; F 2, Mary Frances, married 
Jas. Oliver; F 3, James Lewis, married Clara Chapman; F 4, Berry, 
died in childhood; F 5, Henry Nave, married Eleanor Whittington, 
and F 6, Lee Gray, was killed in a deer hunt in 1876. Their post- 
ofBce is Girard, La. 

E.2. William R., son of J. T. W. Lewis, married Nancy E., 
daughter of Nelson Carter, of Franklin county, Tennessee. Wm. 
R. was a Confederate soldier. He carried on a blacksmith shop ia 
Elyton, Ala., several years and finally settled in Richland Parish, 
La., where he died in 1868, leaving two children, viz. : F 1, William 
Forest, born 1855, and F 2, Sydney Carter, born 1862, who died 
single. Their post-oflfice is Girard, La. 

D 9. David Claiborne Lewis, son of Colonel James, was born in 
1800. He was a small man, with light hair and blue eyes. He 
married Civil Wiggs, sister of A. R. Wiggs. D. Claiborne Lewis 
died childless in Franklin county, Tennessee, in 1851. His widow 
married Charles Crismon. 

D 10. Eliza Ann Monroe Lewis, daughter of Colonel James, born 
in 1803. She was a small woman, weighing about nine-five pounds, 
with light hair, blue eyes and fair skin. She was a member of the 
Methodist church. She married Judge Robert Zachariah Hawkins. 
Judge Hawkins was a lawyer b}^ profession, and was for many years 
Judge of the Probate Court of Morgan county, Alabama. He finally 
became a Methodist preacher. They both died in Decatur, Morgan 
county, about 1840. The remains of Eliza A. M., his wife, was 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 385 

interred in lier fatlier's family burying-ground in Franklin county, 
Tennessee. They had five children, viz. : 

E 1. Mary Maria, was born in 1824. In 1846 she married A, R. 
Wiggs (now of Memphis, Tenn.), a brother of Civil Wiggs. A. R. 
Wiggs is a printer by occupation. Mary Maria has no children. 

E 2, 3 and 4, James, Caleb and Margaret, all died young. 

E 5. Musadora Hawkins, married, in 184G, Dr. Robert R. Dick- 
son, of Marshall county, Alabama. She died near Austin, Travis 
county, Tex., leaving children, viz.: F 1, Elizabeth, etc. 

D 11. Mary Elizabeth Branham Lewis, daughter of Col. James, 
was born in 1805. She was named after her sister, Mary, who mar- 
ried James Branham, and their daughter, Elizabeth. Mary E. B. 
Lewis was about five feet six inches in height, weighing one hun- 
dred and twenty pounds, with dark hair, blue eyes and fair com- 
plexion. She made a profession of religion and attached herself 
to the Methodist church about the year 1834. She was twice mar 
ried. About the year 1823 she married, in Franklin county, Ten- 
nessee, Captain Dyer Moore, son of William Moore, of Albemarle 
county, Virginia. Captain D. Moore was a captain in the War of 
1812. He was a trader and a farmer. After their marriage they 
moved back to Albemarle county, Virginia, where they resided about 
four years. In 1827 they moved again and settled in Franklin 
county, Tennessee, where she now (1886) resides a widow. Captain 
Moore died in 1840. 

Captain D. Moore was born in Albemarle county, Virginia, in 
1795; was six feet two and one-half inches in height, weighing two 
hundred and fifty pounds, with blue eyes, dark hair and dark complex- 
ion. He was a man of great respectability; was a useful member 
of society, and a very staunch citizen. They raised seven children, 
viz. : 

E 1. Lucy Elizabeth, born in Albemarle county, Virginia, in 1824. 

E 2. Sarah Maria, born in Albemarle county, Virginia, in 1825. 

E 3. James Lewis, born in Franklin county, Tennessee, in 1828. 

E 4. Mary Marks, born in Franklin county, Tennessee, in 1830. 

E 5. William Dyer, born in Franklin county, Tennessee, in 1832. 

E 6. Ann Eliza, born in Franklin county, Tennessee, in 1834. 

E 7. Jefferson Carter, born in Franklin county, Tennessee, in 
1836. 

Mrs. Mary E, B. Moore married, as her second husband, Elija. 
D. Bobbins, by whom she had no issue. Her post-office is Win- 
chester, Franklin county, Tenn. 
25 



386 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

E 1. Lucy E., daughter of Captain Dyer Moore, was five feet 
five inches in height. In 1840 she married William H. Matlock, son 
of "William, of Mississippi. They are both members of the Meth- 
odist church and he is a farmer. They live in Franklin county, 
Tennessee, and have had eleven children, whose names are as fol- 
lows: 

F 1. William Dyer Matlock, was born in 1840. He served in 
the Confederate war, and belonged to the 1st Tennessee Regiment 
under Colonel Peter Turney, General Bee's brigade. He was in the 
battle of Manassas, and many others. He is a farmer residing in 
Franklin county, Tennessee. In 1864 he married Mary Clementine 
Thorn, in Tippah county, Mississippi, and has children, viz. : 

G 1. Edward Dyer, born in Tippah county, Mississippi, in 1865. 

O 2. John William, born in 1867, etc. 

E 2. James Lewis Matlock, son of William H., was born in 
1843, and died in 1844. 

F 3. Mary Elizabeth Matlock, was born in De Soto county, Mis- 
sissippi, in 1844. In 1865 she married Captain Henry Weaver, of 
Franklin county, Tennessee. They have children, viz. : G 1, Ida 
Elizabeth, born in 1866. 

Captain Henry Weaver is a farmer. He served in the Confed- 
erate war in the 17th Tennessee Regiment under Colonel Marks; was 
captured at the fall of Fort Donelson, and remained a prisoner 
eight or nine months. 

F 4. John Jefferson Matlock, was born in 1847, and died 

1848. 

F 5. Henry Hamilton Matlock, was born in 1849. 

F 6. Ann Eliza Matlock, was born in 1851. 

F 7. Robert Lewis Matlock, was born in 1854. 

F 8. Ella Matlock, was born in 1857. 

F 9. Lucy Matlock, was born in 1860. 

F 10. Charles Morgan Matlock, was born in 1862. 

F 11. Jefferson Carter Moore Matlock, was born in 1864, and 
died 1865. 

They were all born in Franklin county, Tennessee, except Mary 
Weaver. 

E 2. Sarah Maria Moore, was born in 1825, in Albemarle county, 
Virginia. She was about five feet five inches in height, with 
dark hair, blue eyes and fair complexion. In 1848 she married 
Robert Hines, son of Isaac, of Franklin county, Tennessee. Sarah 
M. is a Methodist and Mr. Hines is a Baptist and farmer. They 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 387 

reside in Franklin county, Tennessee, and have nine children, viz. : 
F 1. Isaac Dyer, born 1849; F 2, Mary Eliza, born 1841; F 3, 
Martha Lavinia, born 1853; F 4, Florence, born 1855; F 5, Tulula, 
born 1857; F 6, Lewis Moore, born 1858; F 7, Laura Rebecca, born 
1861; F 8, Robert Lee, born 1863; F 9, Roberta Marks, born 1865. 
E 3. Captain James Lewis Moore, was born in Franklin county, 
Tennessee, in 1828. He was about six feet one and a half incbes 
high. He was a soldier in the Mexican war. In 1849 he married 
Sarah Jane Simpson, daughter of Thomas E. Simpson, of Lincoln 
county, Tennessee. Sarah Jane, his wife, was born in Bedford 
county, Tennessee, in 1831. They resided in Lincoln county. He 
was a merchant and farmer. He was a soldier in the Mexican and 
Confederate wars. He volunteered in 1862 and went out as a lieu- 
tenant under Captain Bright, Colonel Hunt's 5th Kentucky (after- 
ward called the 9th) Regiment in General Breckinridge's brigade. 
He left home in March and was wounded, in April, 1862, at Shiloh, 
in the shoulder and hip, both flesh wounds, but so severe that he 
was unable to perform military duty; consequently he was dis- 
charged and returned home in July following. In November, 1862, 
after partially recovering from his wounds, he made up a com- 
pany and was elected as its captain and went into service the 
second time, when his life was sacrificed in defense of State rights. 
After his death the following respect to his memory appeared in 
the newspapers of the day: 

A TRIBUTE TO THE MEMORY OF CAPTAIN JAMES 
LEWIS MOORE. 
A model captain has fallen. We pause to drop a tear of sorrow over his 
untimely death. Captain James L. Moore, 2.3d Batallion Tennessee In- 
fantry, Brown's brigade, aged thirty-six j'ears seven months and thirteen 
daj's, received a gun-shot wound in the knee joint August 31st, while gal- 
lantly leading his men in a charge upon the enemj^'s works near Jones- 
borough, Ga., which necessarily caused amputation September 1st, and he 
subsequentl}' died September 3, 1864. He enlisted earlj' in our cause, and 
has fought bravely on every field in which the Army of Tennessee has taken 
a part. None more brave, none more kind, none more generous, none more 
noble than he who has poured out his life's blood upon the altar of his 
country in this great struggle for independence. He was beloved by all 
who knew him, and none spoke of him but in praise. Unaspiring, he was 
content to remain with the company that had chosen him as its leader, and 
render it every service in his power to make it comfortable and contented. 
Nothing shows so well the feelings of a man as the expression he has so 
often been heard to make, to-wit: "I am read}- to retreat, and if need be 
to wade to my neck in the gulf, and turn and fight my way back again, 



388 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

rather than submit to the indignities offered to us by the Lincoln govern- 
ment." Thus he was ever hopeful of our ultimate success even in our 
darliest hours, and was ever ready to denounce everything that led to 
demoralization. His name deserves to be inscribed on the brightest page 
of history and handed down to posterity as the model captain of the age, 
and upon his monument this inscription should be written : "On the field 
of danger he was the bravest of the brave, and in the camps and around 
the fireside the kindest of the kind." He belonged to the Christian church,, 
and died in full faith of an immortal crown of glory. 

He was a member of the Odd Fellow and Masonic fraternities, 
and was buried in Griffin, Pike county, Ga., with the honors of 
Masonry. 

The following is a tribute of respect paid to his memory by the 
Odd Fellows lodge of which he was a member: 

TRIBUTE OF RESPECT, LYNCHBURG HALL, LINCOLN 
LODGE No. 50, I. O. O. F. 

At a regular meeting of said lodge Brothers A. Setlif, S. E. H. Dance' 
and J. L. Bryant, who have been previously appointed Drafting Committee, 
made the following report, which was adopted : 

Whereas, We have been called upon to mourn the loss of our much 
esteemed and dearly beloved brother, James L. Moore, and 

Whereas, The inscrutable ways of Providence are just and right, not- 
withstanding it may be averse to our feelings, therefore 

Resolved, first, That we bow in humble submission to the will of Him who 
doest all things well and for His own glory. 

Resolved, second, That in the death of Brother Moore Lincoln Lodge 
No. 50, I. O. O. F., has lost one of its oldest and most efficient members 
and the Order one of its brightest lights, society one of its surest props 
and his family a loving and affectionate husband and father. 

Resolved, third. That we tender to the bereaved and affectionate wife 
and children and friends of the deceased our deepest and most heartfelt 
condolence. 

Resolved, fourth. That we wear the usual badge of mourning for thirty 
days, and that we clad our hall in mourning for the same period of time. 

Resolved, fifth, That a copy of these resolutions be spread upon our min- 
utes and a copy sent to the family of the deceased. 

(A true copy.) A. M. Prosser, N. G. 

J. T. S. Dance, V. G. 
Thos. J. Shaw, R. T. 

James Lewis Moore had the following children : 

F 1. Silena Elizabeth, born in Franklin county, Tennessee, in 
1850. 

F 2. Dyer Browning, born in Franklin county, Tennessee, in 
1851, and died in 1852. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 389 

F 3. Marilda Margaret, born in Lincoln county, Tennessee, in 
1853. 

F 4. Mary Lucy Thomas, born in Lincoln county, Tennessee, in 
1856. 

F 5. Eulalah Lucilla D. H. , born in Lincoln county, Tennessee, 
in 1857. 

F 6. James Lewis Washington, born in Lincoln county, Ten- 
nessee, in 1862, and resides at El Paso, Tex. 

F 1. Silena E. Moore, who was born in 1850 near Dechard, in 
Franklin county, Tenn., lost her father during the Confederate war. 
She being the oldest child, it devolved upon her to take care of her 
younger brothers and sisters. She is a very energetic woman and 
taught school to aid in the support of the family and to raise means 
to purchase her father's homestead. In the meantime she has been 
a regular contributor to different papers in the State, by which she 
has earned an enviable name as a literary lady. She is a member 
of the Christian church, and was married at the residence of William 
Tolley,near Lynchburg, Moore county, Tenn., by Elder James Holman 
to Dr. T. P. Holman, in 1875. They now reside near Fayette ville, 
Tenn., on a farm, and have children, viz.: Gr 1, Burke, born 1876; 
G 2, Wayne, born 1878; G 3, Leon, born 1879; G. 4, Fanny Lynne, 
born 1882; G 5, Ross, born 1384; G 6, Moore, born 1886. Her 
children were all born in Lincoln county, Tennessee. 

F 3. Marilda Margaret Moore, who was born in 1853, married, 
in 1877, J. H. Taylor, and has four children, viz. : G 1, Joe Allison; 
G 2, Lucy; G 3, Sallie; G 4, Minnie Rush. 

F 4. Mary Lucy Moore, married, in 1881, her cousin, Isaac 
Hines, son of Mrs. Sarah Hines, and had children, viz. : G 1, Moore; 
G 2, Bertie ; G 3, Bessie, etc. They reside in Lincoln count}', Ten- 
nessee. 

E 4. Mary Marks, daughter of Dyer Moore, was born in Franklin 
county, Tennessee, in 1830. She was about five feet five inches in 
height, and was a member of the Methodist church. She married, 
in 1846, George William Stamper, son of John Stamper, of North 
Carolina. Mr. Stamper is a farmer, carpenter, shoemaker, etc. 
They reside in Franklin county, Tennessee, and have eight children, 
viz. : 

F 1. Sarah Celesta, born in 1848. 

F 2. Robert Daniel, born in 1850. 

F 3. Mary Lewis, born in 1852. 

F 4. Laura, born in 1855. 



390 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

F 5. James William, born in 1857, and died 1857. 

F 6. DeWitt Clinton, born in 1859. 

F 7. Emma Justice, born in 1861. 

F 8. George William, born 1865, and died 1865. 

E 5. William Dyer Moore, son of Dyer, was born in Franklin 
county, Tennessee, in 1832. He was about six feet one inch in 
height, and was a member of the Methodist church. He was a 
farmer and stock-raiser, and was a member of the Odd Fellow and 
Masonic fraternities. About the year 1854 he married Susannah 
Harriet Grizzle Danee, daughter of Stephen Danee, a Methodist 
preacher of Lincoln county, Tennessee. He moved to Texas and 
settled near San Antonio, Gaudaloupe county, where he died in 
1865. He was a soldier in the Mexican war, and was also a soldier 
in the Confederate war, and was a member of the 32d Texas Cavalry. 
He returned home from the war with chronic diarrhoea and chills and 
fever, and finally died of dropsy of the chest. He was perfectly 
resigned to his fate, and was willing to die, and the only regret he 
expressed was that of leaving his wife and little children. A few 
months before he died he called his wife to him and said : "Do not 
grieve after me ; bear up under your bereavement as well as you 
can, for your loss is my eternal gain, and God has promised to be a 
father to the fatherless and a husband to the widow, and He who has. 
promised is able and willing to fulfill. ' ' His widow and children 
live near Belmont, Gonzales county, Tex. The names of their chil- 
dren are as follows: 

F 1. Dyer, born 1856. 

F 2. Sarah Danee, born 1858; married Mr. Wright. 

F 3. Mary Annetta, born 1859. 

F 4. James Sheffield, born 1860. 

F 5. William Nathan, born 1863. 

E 6. Ann Eliza Moore, daughter of Dyer, was born in 1834 and 
died in Franklin county, Tennessee, in 1846. 

E 7. Jeflferson Carter Moore, son of Dyer, was born in 1836 in 
Franklin county, Tennessee. He was six feet one and a half inches 
in height. He was a farmer, and member of the order of Odd 
Fellows. In 1856 he married Ellen Elizabeth Bobo, in Bedford 
county, Tennessee, a daughter of Samuel Bobo. He died in Lincoln 
county, Tennessee, in 1866, leaving only one son, viz. : F 1, Elija 
Dyer, born in 1857. 

Some years after the death of Dyer Moore, Mary E. B., his 
widow, married Elija D. Bobbins, who was six feet three inches in 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY, 391 

height, weighing one hundred and eighty pounds, with light hair, 
blue eyes and fair complexion. Mr. Robbins was born in 1787 and 
first married Sarah, daughter of Tureman Lewis, of Spottsylvania 
county, Virginia, where he resided for many years. His children 
were all born in Spottsj'lvania county. He finally moved to 
Franklin county, Tennessee, where Sarah, his first wife, died 
in 1842. For the names of his children by his first wife see the 
posterity of Joel Lewis, of Spottsylvania county, Virginia, on 
another page. 



392 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



CHAPTEE 

MRS. MIRIAM MADISON, OP JESSAMINE COUNTY, KY. 

C 11. Miriam, daughter of David Lewis, Sr. , by his third wife, 
Mrs. Hart, whose maiden name was Mary McGrath, was born in 
Albemarle county, Virginia, in 1759. In 1784 she emigrated to 
Kentucky with her sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Martin. In 1785 she 
married Colonel Gabriel Madison, son of John Madison, of Augusta 
county, Virginia, and his wife, Agatha Strother. 

The Slrothers emigrated from England to Virginia in the early 
Colonial times and settled in what is now Spottsylvania county. 
They were connected by blood and marriage with many of the most 
respectable families of Virginia. They were distinguished for 
courage, talents, members of the State Legislature, officers of the 
army and members of Congress. William Strother, of Stafford 
county, Virginia, and his wife, Margaret Watts, had thirteen children, 
all daughters. Jane Strother, their oldest daughter, married Thomas 
Lewis, son of Pioneer John Lewis, of Augusta county, Virginia. 

Margaret Strother first married a Mr. Morton. Her second 
husband was Gabriel Jones, a kinsman of Lord Fairfax. He resided 
in the Shenandoah Valley upon a farm adjoining the farms of his 
three brothers-in-law, Thomas Lewis, John Madison and John Frog. 
Gabriel Jones was one among the most distinguished lawyers of 
Virginia. Margaret Jones, his daughter, married Colonel John 
Harvie, an officer in the Revolutionary war. He died young, leaving 
one son, who married a Miss Marshall, niece of Chief Justice Marshall. 
Sarah Strother married Colonel Richard Taylor, father of President 
,Zach. Taylor. Agatha, another daughter of William Strother, mar- 
ried John Madison, clerk of the court of Augusta county, Virginia. 
He once owned what is now known as the "Madison Cave" of 
Virginia. John Madison was a member of the Episcopal church. 
By the request of his wife he was in the habit of calling in the ser- 
vants every Sunday morning, reading the morning service to them, 
and praying for them. He kept it up for some time ; at length, one 
morning the servants were all missing; he made inquiry after them, 
when he was informed that some of them had gone to one amuse- 
ment and some to another. He replied that ' ' that they might all 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 393- 

go to the d — 1, he would pray for them no longer." " Be was dis- 
tinguished, ' ' says Governor Gilmer, ' ' among other qualities for his 
love of practical jokes. ' ' 

An Irishman by the name of Curry once obtained his permission 
to exhibit his performances in the court-house in Staunton, Va. 
Whilst Curry was at supper and before the company assembled to 
witness his exploits John Madison placed a pile of powder under the 
table upon which Curry was to stand and laid a train from it to his 
office. Just as he was exhibiting the devil— his phiz, tail, claws and 
cloven foot — the train was fired. It blowed the poor devil, Curry, 
sky high and made the lookers-on imagine that * ' Old Nick ' ' was 
actually present in propria persona. 

A 1. John Madison, was a first cousin (some say uncle) to James 
Madison, President of the United States. 

One of Gabriel Jones' daughters married John Lewis, son of 
Colonel Fielding Lewis, who first married Catharine Washington, a 
cousin to General George, and whose second wife was Betty, sister 
of General Washington. Anna Gabriella Augusta Elizabeth St. Clair 
Jones married John Hawkins and moved to Kentucky. Strother 
Jones, the only son of Gabriel Jones, was an officer in the Revolu- 
tionary war. 

John Hawkins, who married a daughter of Gabriel Jones, raised 
seven children, viz.: 1, Wood; 2, Samuel; 3, Augustus; 4, Lewis; 
5, Llewellyn ; 6, Strother Jones, and 7, Margaret. 6, Strother Jones 
Hawkins married Gabriella Ann Madison, daughter of Colonel 
Gabriel Madison, of Jessamine county, Kentucky. 

A 1. John Madison, and his wife, Agatha Strother, raised nine 
children, viz. : 

B 1. Bishop James Madison, born 1749 ; married Miss Sarah Tate. 

B 2. Richard Madison, married Miss Preston. 

B 3. Thomas Madison, married Susannah, sister of Patrick 
Henry. Susannah was buried on the farm where Sam. Murrill now 
resides (1884) near Bowling Green, Ky. 

B 4. Colonel Gabriel, married Miriam, daughter of David Lewis, 
of Albemarle county, Virginia. 

B 5. Rowland, married Anna, daughter of General Andrew 
Lewis, of Virginia. 

B 6. Governor George, of Kentucky, married Jane Smith, of 
Kentucky. 

B 7. Eliza, married Colonel Andrew, son of General Andrew 
Lewis, of Virginia. 



394 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

B 8. Lucy, married William, son of General Andrew Lewis. 

B 9. Margaret, born 1765; married General William McDowell, 
son of Judge Samuel McDowell, of Rockbridge county, Virginia, 
whose mother was a McClung, of the same county. 

General William McDowell was born in 1762 and his wife in 1765. 
They both died near Bowling Green, Ky., in 1821, leaving the fol- 
lowing-named children: 

C 1. Samuel, born 1787; married Ann J. Rochester. 

C 2. Lucinda, born 1789; married Dennis Brashear. 

C 3. Mary M., born 1791; married George Thompson. 

C 4. Eliza, born 1792; married James Gillespie. 

C 5. John, born 1794. 

C 6. William Strother, born 1796; married Eliza Carthy. 

C 7. Agatha A., born 1798; married James G. Birney. 

C 8. Georgiana P., born 1808; married William H. Rochester. 

C 9. James M., born 1819. 

C 10. Margaret, born 1819. 

B 1. Bishop James Madison and his wife, Sarah Tate, left two 
children, viz. : CI, James Catesby, and C 2, Susan, who married 
R. G. Scott, of Richmond, Va. 

B 7. Eliza, daughter of John Madison, married Colonel Andrew, 
son of General Andrew Lewis, and left posterity, viz. : 

C 1. Charles, died unmarried. 

C 2. Thomas, a distinguished lawj'er, who killed, and was killed 
by Mr. McHenry, in a duel with rifles. He left no issue. 

C 3. Lewis, died young. 

C 4. Agatha Lewis, born 1778; married Colonel Elijah McClana- 
han, of Botetourt county, Virginia; left issue. 

B 8. Lucy, daughter of John Madison, married William, son of 
General Andrew Lewis, by whom she had two children: C 1, Andrew, 
and C 2, Agatha. 

For the information relative to the Madison family we are in- 
debted, in part, to Mrs. Agatha R. Strange, of Bowling Green, Ky. 

John Madison, Sr., was the first of the name that came to Vir- 
ginia. He patented land in Gloucester county, in 1653. John 
Madison, Jr., his son, was the father of Ambrose Madison, who 
married Frances Taylor, daughter of James, August 29, 1721. 
Ambrose Madison was the father of James Madison, Sr. , who mar- 
ried Nelly, daughter of Francis Conway, of Caroline county, Sep- 
tember 13, 1749, and James Madison, Jr., the President, a son of 
James Madison, Sr., was born at Port Conway, March 6, 1751. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 395 

B 5. Roland Madison, married Anna, daughter of General 
Andrew Lewis, and had four children, viz. : 

C 1. John. 

C 2. Eliza Lewis, married Ned Worthington, of Maryland. 

C 3. Andrew Lewis, died a captain in the United States Army. 

C 4. Roland, Jr., resides, in 1873, in Rushville, la. 

B 6. Governor George Madison, left an only daughter, Myra, 
who married a Mr. Andrew Alexander, of Woodford county, Ken- 
tucky. She became blind, and lived with her daughter, Mrs. Appo- 
line Blair, wife of Frank Blair, M. C. , from St. Louis, Mo. ; died 
in 1886. 

B 3. Thomas Madison and his wife, Susannah Henry, had five 
children, viz. : 

C 1 . Agatha, married Mr. Boyer, and died in Virginia. 

C 2. Margaret, married Sylvanus Johnson; both died at Chame- 
lian Springs, Ky. 

C 3. John, married a Miss Hancock, and died at Farmington, Mo. 

C 4. Thomas, Jr., died unmarried. 

C 5. Patrick H. , died unmarried in Missouri. 

B 4. Colonel Gabriel Madison and Miriam Lewis, his wife, raised 
seven children, viz. : 

C 1. Elizabeth, born 1788; married Francis W. Allen, and died 
in Gallatin, Tenn., in 1874. 

C 2. Dr. William Strother, born 1790; married Miss Light- 
foot; killed by an Indian in 1821. 

C 3. Lucy L., born 1792; married Dr. Jo. McMurtrie; died in 
New Albany, la., in 1880. 

C 4. Gabriella Ann, born 1794; married Strother J. Hawkins; 
resides (1883) in Henderson, Ky. Mrs. Hawkins died in 1882. 

C 5. George, born 1796, was twice married; first to Miss ; 

second, to Mrs. White; died in Texas, in 1837. 

C 6. Jane, born 1799; married Dr. William Robertson; died in 
Henderson, Ky., in 1851. 

C 7. Martha, born 1801; married Charles Alexander; died in 
Henderson, Ky. , in 1851. 

B 9. Margaret Madison, born in 1765; married General William 
McDowell, a lawyer by profession; a member of the Presbyterian 
church, and the first Auditor of the State of Kentucky. 

B 1. Bishop James Madison, was a church man of accomplished 
education, and for a long time President of William and Mary Col- 
lege. He was appointed Bishop of Virginia, and went to England 



396 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

during the reign of King George 111. , to receive the investiture of 
that dignity. ' ' In the struggle that preceded the Revolution, ' ' 
says Charles Campbell, in his History of Virginia, ' ' more than two- 
thirds of the Virginia clergy of the established church, and a por- 
tion of the lay members, were loyalists. Of those clergymen who 
adhered to the patriotic side, several were men of note — such as 
James Madison (afterward the first Bishop of Virginia), Bracken, 
Muhlenburg, of the Valley of the Shenandoah, who accepted a colo- 
nel' s commission, raised a regiment and served throughout the 
war ; and Thurston, who also became a colonel. ' ' 

The following account of Bishop James Madison we copy from 
Blake's Biographical Dictionary, page 1081: 

James Madison, D. D., was born August 27, 1749, near Port Republic, 
in Virginia, and his father, John, was the District Clerk of West Augusta. 
Having pursued his preparatory studies in Marj'land, he entered William 
and Mary College, Virginia, where he was distinguished for his classical 
attainments. After taking his degree in 1768, he prosecuted his favorite 
studies with such success, that he became a successful competitor for the 
Botetourt gold medal, which he gained in 1773. He studied law with the 
celebrated Chancellor of Virginia, George Wythe, and was licensed to prac- 
tice at the bar. He soon afterward turned his attention to theologj', and 
was admitted into holy orders. In 1773 he was chosen Professor of Mathe- 
matics in William and Mary College. In 1777, being then only twenty- 
eight years of age, he was elected President of the college, and very soon 
he visited England on subjects connected with his literary pursuits. In 
1788, as Bishop-elect of Virginia, he went again to England for Episcopal 
ordination, and was consecrated at Lambeth, September 19, 1790. On his 
return home he united the performance of his duties as Bisliop, with those 
of President of the college, and Acting Professor of Mathematics and 
Philosophy. Until the close of his life, such were his literary and scien- 
tific pursuits, that he was occupied in lectures from four to six hours every 
day. After a severe illness he died March 6, 1813, in the sixty-third year 
of his age. He married a Miss James, of Virginia. His published works 
are: "A Thanksgiving Sermon," 1781 ; " A Letter to J. Morse," 1795; "An 
Address to the Episcopal Church," 1799, and an able and very eloquent 
discourse on the death of Washington. The reputation of Bishop Madison 
is that of a refined gentleman, an accomplished scholar and an enlight- 
ened and liberal Christian philanthropist. 

B 2. Richard Madison, son of John, married Miss Preston, 
the kinswoman of William C. Preston, the eloquent Senator of 
South Carolina, and late President of Columbia College, South 
Carolina. 

B 5. Rowland Madison, son of John, married Anna, only daughter 
of General Andrew Lewis, the hero of Point Pleasant. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 397 

B 6. Governor George Madison, son of John, emigrated to Ken- 
tucky at an early day. He married Jane Smith, of Kentucky. 

[Prom Border Wars, page 440, by McClung.] 

The hite Governor Madison, of Kentucky, who afterward commanded 
the corps which defended themselves so honorably at Raisin, a man who 
united the most amiable temper to the most unconquerable courage, was at 
that time a subaltern in St. Clair's Army in 1791, and, being a man of infirm 
constitution, was totally exhausted by the exertions of the morning, and 
was now sitting down calmly u^jon a log, awaiting the approach of his 
enemies. Kennon hastily accosted him, and inquired the cause of his 
delay. Madison, pointing to a wound which had bled profusely, replied 
that he was unable to walk further, and had no horse. Kennon instantly 
ran back to a spot where he had seen an exhausted horse grazing, caught 
him without difficulty, and, having assisted Madison to mount, walked by 
his side until they were out of danger. Fortunately, the pursuit soon 
ceased, as the plunder of the camp presented irresistible attractions to the 
enemy. 

The friendship thus formed between these two yoving men endured 
without interruption through life. Mr. Kennon never entirely recov- 
ered from the immense exertions which he was compelled to make during 
this unfortunate expedition. 

George Madison commanded a battalion in the company against 
the British and Indians in 1812-13. When Winchester was de- 
feated he and his battalion stood their ground and continued fight- 
ing until long after all others of the army had surrendered or been 
dispersed. 

[From Blake's Biographical Dictionary.] 
George Madison, Governor of Kentucky, son of the preceding John, at 
the age of seventeen went out as a soldier in defense of the Western frontier 
and was engaged in several battles with the Indians. In St. Clair's defeat 
(1791) he was wounded. In the War of 1813 he was an officer at the battle 
of Raisin. After having been twenty years Auditor of Public Accounts, 
he was chosen Governor for the term of four years in 1816, but in a few 
weeks after his election he died at Paris, Ky. 

B 4. Colonel Gabriel Madison, son of John, was born in Botetourt 
county, Virginia. He married Miriam, daughter of David Lewis, of 
Albemarle county, Virginia. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary 
war, and was under General Winchester in 1812-13; was present at 
the surrender of Winchester' s forces at the River Raisin, and wit- 
nessed the plundering and murdering of their men by the Indians 
under Colonel Proctor on the night of the 21st of January, 1813. 
Winchester's soldiers refused to surrender until Proctor, the British 
commander, promised them protection from the savages. How that 



398 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

promise was kept let the horrors of the succeeding night and day 
reply. That treacherous act covered the name of Proctor with dis- 
grace, and will ever remain a dark spot upon his character. 

Mrs. Miriam Madison died in Jessamine county, Keutuck}^, in 
1845, about seven miles from Lexington, her husband, Colonel Ga- 
briel Madison, having died in the same house in 1804. He was a 
farmer by occupation. They raised seven children, viz. : 

D 1. Elizabeth, born in Jessamine county, Kentucky, in 1788. 

D 2. Dr. William Strother, born in Jessamine county, Kentucky, 
in 1790. 

D 3. Lucy Lewis, born in Jessamine county, Kentucky, in 1792. 

D 4. Gabriella Ann, born in Jessamine county, Kentucky, in 
1794. 

D 5. George, born in Jessamine county, Kentucky, in 1796. 

D 6. Jane, born in Jessamine county, Kentucky, in 1799. 

D 7. Martha, born in Jessamine county, Kentucky, in 1801. 

D 1. Elizabeth Madison, daughter of Colonel Gabriel, born 1788, 
married, in 1803, Francis W. Allen, a farmer, in Fayette county, 
Tennessee, where he died. She resided, in 1858, with her son 
Richard Allen, near Gallatin, Tennessee, where she died in 1874. 
She raised only two sons, viz. : 

E 1. Madison Allen, born in 1806. 

E 2. Richard Allen, born in 1808. 

E 1. Madison Allen, was educated at Transylvania College, Lex- . 
ington, Ky., consequently is a man of fine literary acquirements. 
He is a farmer, living near St. Joseph, Mo. In 1836 he married 
Mary Atchison, sister of Senator David R. Atchison, of Missouri. 
They have children, viz. : F 1, William; F 2, Francis; F 3, Catharine, 
died, etc. 

E 2. Richard Allen, is a farmer. He married, in 1830, Rosa 
Ann Kay, of Fayette county, Kentucky. In 1852 he emigrated to 
and settled near Gallatin, Tennessee, where he died in 1865. He 
left seven children, viz. : 

F 1. Martha A., was born in 1831. 

F 2. Ann (twin sister of Martha), married Mr. Joe Kenny, a 
farmer, in Boyle county, Kentucky. They have four children. 

F 3. Mary E., married Mr. Thomas Watkins, Gallatin, Tenn. 

F 4. George Madison, born 1840; married May Alexander, of 
Dixon Springs, Tenn. ; has three children: G 1, Mary, married Mr. 
Bush, Louisville, Ky. ; G 2, Frank Allen, Tennessee; G 3, Richard 
Allen, Jr., Boyle county, Kentucky. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 399 

F 5. William Andrew, born 1843. 

F 6. Frank, born 1847. 

F 2. Ann, married, in 1855, Joseph Kenny, and has four chil- 
dren, viz.: G 1, Rosa Mentho, born in 1855; G 2, William; G 3, 
Mattie, and G 4, Allan. 

Richard Allan, of Gallatin, Tenn. , is a very frank and hospitable 
gentleman. His latch-string is always out. He is a great lover of 
fine stock, and has been very successful in obtaining premiums at 
the different fairs in Tennessee. 

D 2. Dr. William Strother Madison, son of Colonel Gabriel, was 
born in 1790; was a surgeon in General Taylor's regiment during 
the War of 1812, and was afterward retained in the peace service. 
On his return from Green Bay or Mackinaw he was shot by an Indian 
with whom he accidentally fell in company. They traveled together 
some distance, the Indian appeared very friendly ; but as they were 
crossing a ravine the Indian dropped behind and shot him. He was 
buried at Detroit, Mich., in 1822. He married a Miss Lightfoot 
near Louisville, Jefferson county, Ky., but left no descendants. 

D 3. Lucy Lewis Madison, daughter of Colonel Gabriel, was 
born in 1792. In 1822 she married Dr. Joseph McMurtrie, of Mer- 
cer county, Kentucky, who died of cholera in 1833 at Paris, Ky. 
She resided, a widow, at New Albany, Ind. , where she died in 1880. 
She had five children, viz. : 

E 1. Catharine Blanton, born 1824. 

E 2. Mary, born 1826. 

E 3. Myra Gabriella, born 1828; is single in New Albany, Ind. 

E 4. George Joseph, born 1830; died of consumption, 1856, in 
New Albany. 

E 5. Jane Madison, born 1832. 

E 1. Catharine Blanton McMurtrie, married, in 1844, Theodore 
Lehmann, a teacher and a native of Hanover, Germany. She died 
at Morganfield, Ky., in 1855, of cholera, leaving four living children, 
two having died in infancy, viz. : 

F 1. Adolphus, died young; F 2, John, died young; F 3, Charles 
Alexander; F 4, Frederick Augustus; F 5, Kate, and F 6, Lucy. 

Kate married John Zimmerman, Washington City. She has one 
daughter, Kate Blanton. 

Fred, married, first, Mary Knor ; second wife, Burnetta Brockett. 

E 2. Mary McMurtrie, was born in 1826. In 1852 she married 
Theodore Parson, of New York, a teacher by profession. They 
reside in Henderson, Ky. , and have one daughter, Lucy Emma, 



400 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

now married to Young Watson, of Henderson, Ky. , and they have 
three children. 

E 4. George Joseph Madison, was born in 1830. He died of 
consumption in New Albany in 1856. He was a good and pious 
young man and died a Christian. 

E 5. Jane Madison McMurtrie, was born in 1832. She married 
Judge Jefferson Brown, a lawyer by profession, of Morganfleld, 
Union county, Ky. Judge Brown was found in the canal at Louis- 
ville, Ky. , dead. He had been missing ten weeks. It is thought 
he was murdered for his money and thrown into the canal. His 
widow married the second time Mr. Cabell Allen, of Louisville, Ky. 

D 4. Gabriella Ann Madison, daughter of Colonel Gabriel, was 
born in 1794. She married, in 1815, John Strother Hawkins, a 
farmer of Frankfort, Ky,, and is living in Henderson, Ky. They 
had seven children, viz. : 

E 1, Miriam, born in 1818. She was named after her grand- 
mother. She is quite an accomplished lady; endowed by nature 
with a clear, vigorous and sprightly intellect. We here present the 
reader with a piece of poetry from her pen which we clip from the 
May Flower, a paper published at Henderson, Ky. : 

[For the May Flower.] 
THE MOTHER'S REVERIE. 
I've watched beside thy cradled rest 

With fancies fond and wild ; 
O! would I might the future read 

For thee, my sinless child! 
In vain, in vain, its darkened page 

Gives back no answering gleam. 
And loving hopes and fancies wild 

Pass like a troubled dream. 

Amidst the loving and the gay 

Will it be thy lot to roam? 
Will thy brow keep its sunny smile 

To deck thy future home ? 
Will thy path through life be bright 

With sunshine and with flowers, 
And thy light tears be quickly dried 

As summer's passing showers? 

Or must thou, with the cold and proud. 

Act sad thy woman-part. 
And learn beneath a smiling brow 

To hide an aching heart? 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 401 

Wilt thou e'er weep o'er warm hearts still'd 

Or loving ones estranged, 
Or fondly dream of perfect love 

And weep to find it changed"? 

I know not babe! To Him who gave 

The treasure to my care, 
To Him would I the charge commit 

In truthfulness and praj'er. 
God's smile be on thee, gentle one, 

His blessing to thee given, 
What needs it that the path be smooth 

If it leadeth thee to heaven? 

E 1. Miriam Hawkins, married David Banks, who is cashier of 
the Bank of Henderson, and resides at Henderson, Ky. They 
have eight children, viz.: F 1, Ella; F 2, Strother; F 3, James; F 4, 
John; F 5, David; F 6, Caroline; F 7, Wm. Paul, and F 8, Maggie 
Hawkins. 

E 2. Ethalinda Hawkins, married John T. Hopkins, of Hender- 
son, Ky., a farmer. They have four children, viz. : F 1, Anna, died; 
F 2, Strother; F 3, John, and F 4, Ella, single. 

E 3. Llewellyn Hawkins, married and resides near Hawesville, 
Ky. , as a teacher. He has children: F 1, Gabriella, etc. 

E 4. Gabriella Hawkins, married John Hart, a farmer of Hen- 
derson county, Kentucky. Had two sons: F 1, Banks, and F 2, 
Hawkins. 

E 5. John Hawkins, died of consumption in 1848. 

E 6. J. Strother Hawkins, Jr. , and 

E 7. Margaretta Hawkins. 

D 5. George, son of Colonel Gabriel Madison, was born in 1796. 
He emigrated to Texas in 1833. Was twice married. He died in 
1837. He left no children. His second wife was a Mrs. While. 

D 6. Jane, daughter of Colonel Gabriel Madison, was born in 
1799. In 1833 she married Dr. William Robertson, of Illinois, and 
died in Henderson, Ky., in 1852, leaving two children, viz.: E 1, 

Miriam Lewis, born in 1837, married Stallard, St. Joe, Mo., 

and E 2, Bettie Martin Douglass, born in 1839. They were residing 
with their father near St. Joseph, Mo. After the death of Jane, his 
first wife, he married Ann Lewis Browning, a great-granddaughter 
of Mrs. Hannah Hickman, of Clark county, Kentucky, who was a 
half-sister of Mrs. Miriam Madison, the mother of Jane, his first wife. 

D 7. Martha, daughter of Colonel Gabriel Madison, was born in 
1801. In 1822 she married Charles Alexander, of Virginia, who 
26 



402 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

was of Scotch descent. She died in Henderson, Ky,, in 1851. She 
had two sons, viz. : 

E 1. Colonel Charles M., was born in Woodford county, Ken- 
tucky, in 1833. He graduated at Marietta College, Marietta, 0., 
and located in Washington City, D. C, in 1856. During the Civil 
war he served as a private for three months in the army, after which 
he acted as colonel of the 2d District of Columbia Regiment. Dur- 
ing President Johnson's administration he acted as Post-master in 
Washington City, where he died in 1890. He was an eminent law- 
yer, and a man of sterling integrity. He married, in 1855, Eliza 
Dow, of New Albany, Ind., by whom he had four children, viz. : 

F 1. Percy, died young. 

F2. Thomson H., died. 

F 3. Apolline, married, in 1884, James L., son of Hon. FrauK 
P. Blair, of St. Louis, Mo. They have two children, viz.: G 1, 
Percy, and G 2, Preston. 

F 4. William D., son of Colonel Charles Alexander. 

E 2. Thomson Hanky, son of Martha and Charles Alexander, 
was born in Woodford county, Kentucky, in 1837. In 1856 he 
located in Washington City, where he studied law, and has contin- 
ued the practice of his profession ever since. He is now (1891) 
Solicitor of United States and Foreign Patents, and Counsel in Pat- 
ent and Trade-Mark Causes. Office No. 607 Seventh street, N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 

A successful practice extending over a period of thirty years, 
enables him to offer to the public the benefits of an experience, 
which, in the event of their kindly favoring him with their patron- 
age, will be found conducive to their interest. His business is con- 
ducted with promptness and fidelity, while his terms are as liberal 
as possible — consistent with good professional service. During the 
Civil war he served three months in the army as a soldier. He mar- 
ried Miss Sallie J. Kennerly, of Washington City, but has no chil- 
dren. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 403 



CHAPTEE XXIT. 

JEAN LEWIS, OF ENGLAND. 

A 1. Jean Lewis, who was born in France in 1678, was a lawyer by 
profession. In 1697 he fled from France on account of religious intol- 
€ration, to England, and bought an estate in Wales. He joined the 
English Army, and was with Prince Eugene and the Duke of Marl- 
borough in the battles of Blenheim, Ramilies, Oudenarde, Malplaquet 
and man}- others. On account of his gallantry he was placed in 
command of the British forces in Flanders, in 1709, and it is said 
in the History of the Huguenots, that he was, during his life, in nine- 
teen pitched battles, and twenty-three sieges. He died in England, 
full of honors, aged ninety-two years. 

Issue of A 1, Jean Lewis 

B 1. Zachary, born in Wales, in 1702. 

B 2. John, born in Wales, in 1704. 

B 1. Zachary Lewis, who was one of the most distinguished 
lawyers of Virginia, died in King and Queen or Middlesex county, in 
1765. He married Mary, daughter of Benjamin Waller, in 1725. 
She died in 1781. They had ten children, viz. : 

C 1. Anne, born November 30, 1726; died August 8, 1748. She 
married Chancellor George Wythe, and died without issue. 

C 2. Mary, born January 30, 1727; married Mr. Meri- 
wether. 

C 3. John, born October 18, 1729; died September 12, 1780. 
He was called the honest lawyer. He quit the practice of law and 
turned his attention to the practice of medicine. He married Mil- 
dred, daughter of Robert Lewis and Jane Meriwether, of Albemarle 
county, Virginia. 

C 4. Colonel Zachary, Jr., born May 6, 1731; died July 21, 
1803; married Ann Overton, daughter of Richmond Terrell, of 
Louisa county, Virginia, May 8, 1771. Ann 0., was born Septem- 
ber 3, 1748, and died November 3, 1820. 

Colonel Zachary Lewis, Jr. , was a student of William and Mary 
College with Thomas Jefferson, and, after completing his education, 
accompanied General Washington, and remained with him some 
time at old Fort Cumberland, in 1755. He was promoted to a colo- 



404 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

nelcy, and finally settled at Belair, in Spottsylvania county, where 
he died. 

C 5. Betty, born October 9, 1732; married Colonel Littlepage 
and Lewis Holladay. 

C 6, Morning, born April 1, 1734, and died April 12, 1734. 

C 7. Lucy, born December 5, 1735; married Mr, Ford; went 

to South Carolina. 

C 8. Dorothea, born September 3, 1737; married Christopher 
Smith. 

C 9. Waller, born September 11, 1739; married Sarah, daughter 
of Robert Lewis and Jane Meriwether, of Albemarle county, sister 
of Mildred, who married his brother, John. 

C 10. Benjamin, born June 16, 1744; married Patsy Deberson. 

Issue of C 4, Zachary Lewis, Jr., of 1731, and Ann Overton 
Terrell : 

D 1. Ann Overton, born April 23, 1772; married July 28, 1795, 
Dr. James Scott, and died September 11, 1795. 

D 2. Richmond, M. D., born March 14, 1774. He first married 
Elizabeth Travers Daniel, sister of Hon. Peter V. Daniel, one of the 
Judges of the Supreme Court of the United States. His second wife 
was Margaret Richardson. He left a daughter, E 1, Hulda, who 

married a Mr. Scott, a lawyer of distinction, in Spottsylvania 

county; also a son in the same county, named E 2, John Z. Lewis. 

D 3. Cadwallader, born November 25, 1776; died unmarried, 
February 4, 1796. 

D 4. Mary Waller, born April 10, 1779; married John Hill. 

D 5. Hulda Fontaine, born February 4, 1781 ; married Waller 
Holladay. She was the mother of John L. Holladay, who repre- 
sented his county in the State Legislature, and of Alexander Holla- 
day, who was a member of Congress. 

D 6. John, born February 25, 1784; married Jean Wood Daniel, 
in 1808, daughter of Travers Daniel, a sister of Judge Peter V. 
Daniel, of Virginia, and died in Frankfort, Ky., August 15, 1858, 
leaving issue. 

The following obituary notice we copy from the Frankfort Com- 
monwealth, published at Frankfort, Ky,, August 24, 1858: 

DEATH OF JOHN LEWIS, OF LLANGOLLEN. 

It is with much regret that we record the death of John Lewis, Esq., 
which occurred at his residence in this city on Sundaj', the 15th inst., and 
we can not let this occasion pass without a notice at some length of this 
good and wise man. Mr. Lewis was formerly of Llangollen, Spottsylvania 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 405 

county, Va. ; born on the 25th of February, 1784, he was, consequently, in 
the seventy-fifth year of his age. He was the son of Colonel Zachary 
Lewis, of Belair, in Spottsylvania county. His father was the messmate of 
General Washington in the war witli the French, and bequeathed to his 
'son his small sword, worn at that time, and his powder-horn, with looking- 
glass in the reverse, which was used by the chieftain and himself at their 
camp toilet. These relics, prized for their associations, have been care- 
fully preserved to this time, and bequeathed to two of his grandsons, who 
are named after him. Having caught the military ardor of his father, we 
find him, in 1813, in command of a troop of horse, and entrusted with 
watching the movements of the British fleet in the Potomac, which was 
attempting constant depredations on the adjoining country. While so en- 
gaged he was afflicted with camp fever, which brought him to the verge of 
the grave, and he was thus prevented from further participation in the 
military operations of that day. In early life he was engaged actively in 
the practice of law, but having a natural fondness for teaching, he estab- 
lished a High School for young men at Llangollen, in Virginia, and for 
many years taught successfullj' Virginia's most noble sons, earning a repu- 
tation as an instructor equaled by few and unsurpassed by none. He de- 
clined several offers of the professorships of colleges in his native State, 
preferring to teach his school at home. Removing to Georgetown, Ky., in 
1833, he there established a female academy, but retaining his love for 
the country, in a few j'ears he came to this vicinity, and has, with a 
short intermission, continued at his post until the last. He seemed to seek 
no pleasure above that of imparting to the young his varied and extensive 
knowledge. He was a fine classical scholar and mathematician ; was well 
acquainted with the French, Spanish and Italian languages — unusually so 
with the physical sciences, and in the department of Belles Leiires his 
acquirements were unsurpassed by anyone within our knowledge. Besides 
being a very frequent contributor to the leading journals of past times, in 
which he acquired considerable distinction, he was the author of a system 
of arithmetic, and of various works of fiction in poetry and prose, among 
the latter of, " Young Kate, or the Rescue." 

A model gentleman of the old school, he possessed very fine conversa- 
tional powers, and great tenderness of feeling, which were continually man- 
ifested toward all who came in contact with him, especially toward his 
children and grandchildren. Among his relatives and connections in his 
native State, are numbered men distinguished in law and politics, among 
■others, Judge Daniel, of the United States Supreme Court, whose sister he 
married. 

For some fourteen years past he had been a communicant of the old- 
school Presbyterian church. As a Christian he was as simple and unostenta- 
tious as a child, yet he possessed all the strength of a mature Christian. 
During the whole of his last illness he bore his sufferings with perfect 
patience and resignation, and with a mind conscious to the last. He, in 
his death, gave the most triumphant proof of a victory through Christ 
ever witnessed by those who were most accustomed to see men die. 

Verily, a good and wise man has fallen in our midst! 



406 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

D 7. Eliza, born May 27, 1786; married Walter Kaleigb Daniel, 
a brother of Judge Peter V. Daniel, and died in September, 1816. 

D 8. William, born August 20, 1788; died five hours after birth. 

D 9. Kev. Addison Murdock, born September 26, 1789; married 

Miss Billingslea and Miss Minor. He was born at Belair, 

in Spottsylvania county; was baptized on the 3d of July, 1808. 
In 1809 he appeared as a messenger of the Gold Mine church to the 
Goshen Association. About the year 1830 he migrated to Ken- 
tucky; subsequently he removed to the State of Missouri, near 
Glasgow, Howard county, there laboring in the ministiy until the 
year 1857, when he was called away to his reward. 

D 6. Issue of John Lewis and Jean Wood Daniel, viz. : 

E 1. Frances Ann, born March 3, 1810; married Wm. Mitchell, 
of Vicksburg, Miss. 

E 2. Rev. Cadwallader, born November 5, 1811, in Spottsylvania 
county, Virginia, and was prepared by his father, John Lewis, of 
Llangollen, to enter the University of Virginia, where he completed 
his education. He came to Kentucky in 1831, taught school at Cov- 
ington and at Georgetown, and in 1834 settled upon a farm near 
Frankfort, where he lived until his death, April 22, 1882. In 1846 
he became a minister of the Baptist church and was widely known 
throughout Kentucky and the Southern States as a writer of great 
ability, and as one of the most eloquent and useful preachers in that 
denomination. At the close of the war he was called to the chair of 
Theology and Belles Lettres in Georgetown College, Kj., which he 
filled for several years. He was a man of varied attainments, a 
thorough scholar and successful in all his undertakings. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Henry Pattison, of Appomattox C. H., Va., and left 
issue. 

E 3. Elizabeth Travers, born July 10, 1813; unmarried. 

E 4. George Wythe, born February 9, 1815; married Mary Jane 
Todd. 

E 5. Mary Overton, born November 7, 1816; unmarried. 

E 6. John Moncure, born May 11, 1820; died March 21, 1845. 

E 7. Jean Wood Daniel, born September 22, 1822; married Dr. 
Alexander Augustus Pattison, of Virginia. 

E 8. Dr. Richmond Addison, born April 4, 1824; married Mary 
G. Mitchell, resides at Richmond, Va. 

E 9. Lucy Daniel, born December 15, 1826; unmarried. 

E 10. Susan Walter Raleigh, born December 9, 1828; married 
Rev. John Gano Price, of Kentucky. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY, 407 

E 11. Walter Raleigh Daniel, boru November 30, 1830; single. 

E 12. James Minor, born May 10, 1833, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

E 1. Issue of Frances Ann Lewis and Wm. Mitchell, of Vicks- 
burg, Miss. : ' 

F 1. James; F 2, Jean Lewis; F 3, Lewis Edward, married Miss 
Addie Bledsoe, of Mississippi; F 4, Wm. Gillan; F 5, Francis 
Norgate, married Zenobia Martin, of Texas, and F 6, Walter 
Erskine. 

E 2. Issue of Cadwallader Lewis, son of John and Jean Wood 
Daniel, and Elizabeth H. Pattison, his wife, viz. : 

F 1. William Jarrett, married Louisa Taylor Wallace, of Wood- 
ford county, Kentucky, and resides at Woodlake, Franklin county, 
Ky. , where he runs a stock farm at Belair. They have issue, viz. : 
G 1, Frances Taylor; Gr 2, Elizabeth H. Lewis. 

F 2. John Alexander, son of Cadwallader Lewis, married Mar- 
garet Jane Scott, of Franklin county, Kentucky. They reside at 
Stamping Ground, Scott county, Ky., and have issue, viz.: G 1, 
John Cadwallader; G 2, Sidney Scott; G 3, Waller; G 4, Mary; 
G 5, Elizabeth, and G 6, Jane Rebecca Lewis. 

F 3. Norborne Vivian, son of Cadwallader. 

F 4. Waller Holladay, of Woodlake, Franklin county, Ky., with 
his brother, runs the Belair stock farm. 

F 5. Mary Pattison, and 

F 6. Charles Cadwallader, who married Letitia Barron, of 
Daviess county, Kentucky. They have issue, viz. : G 1, Charles 
Cadwallader; G 2, Celia Boyd; G 3, Maud McFarland. 

E 4. George Wythe Lewis, son of John and Jean Wood Daniel; 
married Mary Jane Todd, of Frankfort, Ky. He spent his life in 
Frankfort and Lexington, Ky. , as an editor and publisher, and had 
issue as follows: F 1, Joseph Bullock; F 2, John Franklin; F 3, 
Wm. Todd, and F 4, George Alexander. 

Issue of F 1, Joseph Bullock Lewis by his first wife, Emma 
Abbott, viz.: G 1, Margaret; G 2, William, and G 3, George. After 
the death of Emma Abbott he married Keturah Thornton, of Ver- 
sailles, Ky. 

Issue of F 2, John Franklin Lewis, and Mary Sneed, of Frank- 
fort, Ky,, viz. : G 1, Sneed; G 2, John, and G 3, Wm. Herndon. 

Issue of Jean Wood, daughter of John Lewis and Jean Wood 
Daniel, and Dr. Alexander Augustus Pattison, of Appomattox 
C. H., now of Sangamon county, Illinois, viz. : 

F 1. Augusta, married John Parkinson, of Sangamon county, 



-408 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

Illinois, and has issue, viz. : G 1, Ernest; Gr 2, William; G 3, Jean; 
G 4, Mary, and G 5, John Parkinson. 

F 2. Jean Frances, married Dr. Joseph Wilcox, of Sangamon 
county, Illinois, and has issue, viz.: G 1, Dwight; G 2, Augustus, 
•and G 3, Annie Wilcox. 

F 3. Alexander L. , married Ella Robinson, of Sangamon county, 
Illinois, and has issue, viz.: G 1, Ella; G 2, Susan, etc. 

F 4. Susan Archer, married Hampton Gibson, of Sangamon 
county, Illinois, and has issue, viz. : G 1, Jean; G 2, Preston; G 3, 
John ; G 4, Robert Gibson ; G 5, Marion Elizabeth, married Richard 
Smith. 

E 8. Dr. Richmond Addison Lewis, son of John and Jean Wood 
Daniel, married Margaret Gillan Mitchell, of Richmond, Va., where 
he now resides and ranks with the first physicians of the city. Their 
children are, viz.: F 1, John Moncure; F 2, Waller Morton; F 3, 
Richmond and Read Lewis. 

F 1. John Moncure, married Elizabeth Humphries Price, of 
Franklin county, Kentucky, and lives in Richmond, Va, Their 
children are: G 1, Hugh Rodman; G 2, John Moncure, died single; 
G 3, Richmond Addison; G 4, Margaretta Gillan, and G 5, James 
Mitchell. 

F 2. Waller Morton (of Richmond, Va.), married Sophia Red- 
ding, of Vicksburg, Miss. Their children are: G 1, Beach Redding; 
G 2, Margaretta Gillan; G 3, Richmond Addison, and G 4, Waller 
Morton. 

F 3. Richmond Lewis, of Richmond, Va., married Leila Curry, 
of Richmond, Va. , and has one child: G 1, Fanny Mitchell Lewis. 

E 9. Lucy Daniel, ninth child of John and Jean Wood Daniel, 
married James M. Holladay, of Spottsylvania county, Virginia. 
Their children are: F 1, Louise Richmond; F 2, John Waller, and 
F 3, James Minor. 

E 10. Susan Raleigh, tenth child of John and Jean Wood Daniel, 
married Dr. John Gano Price, of Franklin county, Kentucky. Their 
children are: F 1, Elizabeth Humphries; F 2, Jean Wood; F 3, 
Susan Gano, and F 4, John Lewis Price. 

F 1. Elizabeth H. Price, married John Moncure Lewis, her 
cousin, of Richmond, Va. 

F 3. Susan Gano Price, married Wm. B. Allison, of Franklin 
county, Kentucky, and resides in Richmond, Va. Their children 
are: G 1, Annie Lewis; G 2, Lizzie Price, and G 3, John Gano 
Allison. 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 409 

E 12. James Minor, son of John and Jean Wood Daniel, mar- 
ried Eupliemia Miller Todd, of Madison county, Mississippi, and 
now resides at Frankfort, Ky. Their children are: F 1, Vivian 
Travis; F 2, Eugenia Richmond, and F 3, Effie Todd. 

John Moncure Lewis died just as he reached manhood. 

Walter Raleigh Lewis volunteered in the Confederate Army, and 
died during the siege of Port Hudson, La. 

James Minor Lewis studied medicine and then became a minister 
of the Baptist church, and is at present (1884) located at Frankfort, 
Ky. He has been pastor at Canton, Miss., New Orleans, La., and 
JefTerson, Tex. 

JOHN LEWIS, JR., OF KING AND QUEEN COUNTY, VA. 

B 2. John, Jr. , son of Jean Lewis, who emigrated from France 
to Wales, was born about 1704-5. He wasli lawyer of distinction; 
married Sarah Iverson, settled in King and Queen county, Virginia, 
and left posterity, viz. : 

C 1. Ann, married Rev. Edward Byne, of King and Queen 
county, Virginia, and died in Burke county, Georgia, leaving pos- 
terity. 

C 2. Rev. Iverson Lewis, born 1741 ; was married three times 
and died in King and Queen county, Virginia, in 1815. 

[From " Virginia Baptist Ministers,"' first series, page 253. Hy .lames B. Taylor, and 
published by Lippincott & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.] 

REV. IVERSON LEWIS. 
Iverson Lewis was the son of John Lewis, whose father, Zachary Lewis, 
emigrated to this country from Brecknockshire, Wales, in the year 1693, 
at which time he settled in the county of King and Queen, State of Vir- 
ginia. Iverson was born the 4th of March, 1741, at the family residence in 
King and Queen, where he lived and died. He was educated in the estab- 
lished religion of his daj^ — was immersed in 1770, or 1771, after being con- 
verted under the preaching of Rev. John Waller. He died the 5th day of 
January, 1815. 

C 3. Catharine, daughter of John Lewis and Sarah Iverson, 
married Mr. Richards and left two daughters, viz. : 

D 1. Elizabeth, married Mr. Watts, and 

D 2. Nancy Ann, married Mr. Dunn, who left one son: 

E 1, Thomas Iverson Dunn. 

C 4. Christopher, married, in South Carolina, a relative of Gen- 
eral Wade Hampton, and had issue. 

C 5. Sarah Iverson, married a Mr. Rogers, of Virginia, and left 
posterity. 



410 GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

C 1. Issue of Ann Lewis and Rev. Edmond Byne, viz. : 

D 1. Ann, married Augustus Harris, died at Pomona, near Mill- 
edgeville, Ga. 

D, 2. Daughter, married Moses Walker, of Brunswick county, Vir- 
ginia. 

D 3. Thomas; D 4, Lewis, and D 5, Richard Byne. 

Issue of C 2, Rev. Iverson Lewis, by Frances Byrd, his first wife: 

D 1. Ann, married Jonathan Brooks, of Caswell county. North 
Carolina. She had five children, viz.: E 1, Rev. Iverson L. Brooks, 
of Abbeville, S. C. ; E 2, George Brooks ; E 3, Thomas Brooks ; 
E 4, Wm. L. Brooks, and E 5, John L. Brooks. 

D 2. Dr. Wm. B. Lewis, son of Iverson, graduated at William 
and Mary College, Virginia. He became a member of the Medical 
College of Edinburgh, Scotland, and received a diploma in the litei'ary 
and medical department, signed by twenty-four professors; among 
these some of the most distinguished names known to the literar}' 
world — such as Ferguson, Blair, Robertson, Dugald, Stewart, 
Greenfield, Playfair, Dalzel, Hume, etc. After returning home, he 
practiced with great reputation at the head of the medical profes- 
sion for four years in Eastern Virginia, and died through exposure. 
He never married. 

D 3^. Frances, married Solomon Graves, of North Carolina, and 
had seven children, viz. : E 1, William B., of Randolph county, 
Georgia; E 2, John D., of Texas; E 3, Frances L., married Dr. W. 
P. Graham; E 4, Solomon, Jr.; E 5, Iverson L. ; E 6, General B. 
Graves, of Randolph county, Georgia, and E 7, Sidney Graves, died 
young. 

D 4. Joanna, married James Dickey and left seven children, 

viz.: E 1, William; E 2, Ann, married McGrasly, of Nelson 

county, Virginia; E 3, Frances L., married John W. Wakins, of 
King and Queen county, Virginia; E 4, Jonathan, married Miss 

Daniel, of Middlesex county, Virginia ; E 5, Ann D. , married 

Colonel Mason, of Middlesex county; E 6, Marion, single, and E 7, 
Elizabeth, single. 

D 5. Dr. John Lewis, son of Iverson, died of j^ellow fever at 
Norfolk, Va., on his embarkation for Europe. He never married. 

Issue of C 2, Rev. Iverson Lewis by Martha Clopton, his second 
wife: 

D 6. Dr. Zachary Lewis, was a demonstrator of anatomy in the 
Medical College of Philadelphia for some years; now practices in 
King and Queen county, Virginia. He has been twice married. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY , -111 

His first wife was a daughter of the Rev. Mr. Skison, of the 

Episcopal church, by whom two sons survive, viz. : El, Dr. John 
J. Lewis, who married a Miss Hill and resides in King William 
county, Virginia, and E 2, Dr. Wm. B. Lewis, who married a 
daughter of E. Winston Henry and granddaughter of Patrick Henry, 
and resides in Pittsylvania county, Virginia. Zachary's second wife 
was a daughter of the Hon. John Clopton, formerly a member to 
Congress, and his brother is one of the Circuit Judges of Virginia. 

D 7. Sarah Iverson, daughter of Iverson Lewis, married Thomas 
G. Crittendon and left posterity. 

D 8. Martha Churchill, was twice married ; first to Geo. Shackle- 
ford, leaving no issue; second to Rev. Richard Claybrook and left 
three children, viz.: E 1, Wm. L. , a lawyer of Lancaster county, 
Virginia ; E 2, Zachary L. , and E 3, Frances Elizabeth, who married 
Samuel Fauntleroy, M. D. 

D 9. Iverson Lewis, Jr. , volunteered in a company of cavalry in 
the War of 1812, and died in his country's service. 

Issue of C 2, Rev. Iverson Lewis and Catharine Byrd, his third 
wife, viz. : 

D 10. Catharine, died single. 

D 11. Mary, married Mr. Backhouse, of Gloucester county, 

Virginia, and left one son: E 1, John W. Backhouse. 

Issue of Christopher Lewis and his wife, who was a relative of 
Wade Hampton, of South Carolina, viz. : 

D 1. Sarah Iverson, who married a Mr. Oliver, of Louisiana. 

D 2. John Christopher, who married a Miss Wardlaw, of 

Abbeville, S. C, and had issue as follows: 

E 1. Mrs. Scott, of Augusta, Ga. 

E 2. Mrs. , of Barnwell, S. C. 

E 3. Oscar, married a Miss Boyston, in Louisiana. 

E 4. Andrew W. 

E 5. David C, railroad agent, Augusta, Ga. 

E 6. Name not known, a mechanic. 



412 t GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY, 



5 

B, viz. : 


B 1. 


B2. 


B3. 


B4. 


B5. 


B6. 


B7. 


B 8. 


B 9. 


B3. 



CHAPTER XXY. 

JOHN LEWIS, OF SHENANDOAH COUNTY, VA. 

A 1. John Lewis, was born in Wales. He married Margaret 
died in Shenandoah county, Virginia, and had issue, marked 

Reese Lewis, born 1730. 
Susannah, born 1735. 

Amos, born 1737; married Mollie Chrisman. 
Thomas, born 1739. 
Annie, born 1742. 
George, born 1744. 
Hannah, born 1746; died 1748. 
Evan, born 1749. 

Mordecai, born 1751 ; married Marj' Segler. 
Amos, who was born in Shenandoah county, Virginia, in 
1737, married Mollie Chrisman, and about the year 1809 he settled 
in Rhea county, Tennessee, where he died in 1811. His wife died 
in Knox county, Tennessee. They had issue, marked C, viz. : 

C 1. John; C 2, William; C 3, David; C 4, James; C 5, Isaac: 
C 6, Jesse ; C 7, Modlin, married Wm. Cunningham ; C 8, Elizabeth, 
married Chrisley Pickle ; C 9, Sallie, married Wm. Seymore. 
Issue of C 1, John Lewis, viz. : 

D 1. William; D 2, Jane; D 3, Willie; D 4, Davis; D 5, John, 
Jr., and D 6, Scotia. 

Issue of C 2, William Lewis, viz. : 

D 1. Mark; D 2, Polly, married B. D. Armstrong; D 3, Thomas 
J., of Aberdeen, Miss. ; D 4, Wm. C, in Texas, and C 5, Johu J. 
Issue of C 4, James Lewis, viz. : 

D 1. Susan; D 2, Hiram; D 3, Alfred; D 4, Calvin; D 5, Jona- 
than P. , and D 6, Rebecca. The two last named reside in Chocta^v 
county, Mississippi. 

Issue of C 5, Isaac Lewis, viz. : 

D 1. Sallie; D 2, David; D 3, John C. ; D 4, Penelope; D 5, 
Charles W. ; D 6, Melinda, and D 7, Lucinda. 

Issue of C 7, Modlin Lewis and Wm. Cunningham, viz. : 
D 1. Jesse; D 2, Willie, etc. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 413 

Issue of B 6, George Lewis, son of John and Margaret, viz. : 

C 1. Enoch; C 2, Levi; C 3, Aaron; C 4, John, etc. 

B 9. Mordecai Lewis, son of John and Margaret, was born in 
1751, and married Mary Segler. After the close of the Revolutionary 
war he emigrated from Shenandoah county, Virginia, to Tennessee, 
carrying with him the old Welsh Bible that was brought from Wales, 
which is now in the possession of his descendants in Marion county, 
Tennessee. He left eight children, viz. : 

C 1. Amos, born 1777. 

C 2. John, born 1779. 

C 3. George Henry Washington, born 1781; married Rebecca 
Walker. 

C 4. Levi, born 1784. 

C 5. Archibald, born 1786; married Nancy Mitchell. 

C 6. Polly, born 1788. 

C 7. Margaret, born 1790. 

C 8. Betsy, born 1793. 

Issue of C 3, G. H. W. Lewis and Rebecca Walker, viz. : 

D 1. Rev. Charles K., born 1809; died in 1882. 

D 2. Thomas Jefferson, born 1810; died a prisoner at Camp 
Chase, 0., in 1865. 

D 3. Minerva Tennessee, born 1812; married Rev. James D. 
Harris. 

D 4. Martha Emeline, born 1814; married Wm. Stiphans, of 
Bledsoe county, Tennessee. 

D 5. Wm. Hart, born 1816; died at Little Rock, Ark., in 1865; 
was a Federal soldier, and belonged to the Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment. 

D 6. Caroline Virginia, born 1818; was drowned when fourteen 
years of age. 

D 7, Mordecai Asbury, born 1820; married Adeline Mitchell. 

D 8. Harriet Jane, born 1823; married Matthew Girdly, of 
Marion county. 

D 9. Daniel Walker, born 1825. 

D 10, George Washington, born 1827, and 

D 11. Rebecca Ann Catharine, born 1830. 

Issue of Mordecai Lewis and Adeline Mitchell, of Jasper, Tenn. , 
viz. : 

E 1. Amanda Carolina, born 1847; married Dr. H. W. Griffith, 
of Jasper, Tenn. She died^n 1884; left one son: Charles Madison 
Griffith, born 1849. 



414 GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 

E 2. Thos. Milton, bora 1849. 

E 3. John Mitchell, bora 1851. 

Issue of C 5, Archibald Lewis and Nancy Tifny Mitchell, viz. : 

D 1. Fielding, bora 1809. 

D2. William A., bora 1810. 

D 3. Polly, bora 1811. 

D 4. John, bora 1813; died. 

D 5. Sarah, bora 1815. 

D 6. Jas. M., bora 1817. 

D 7. Nancy, bora 1819. 

D 8. Charlotte M., bora 1820. 

D 9. Lucinda, bora 1823. 

D 10. Amos, born 1824; married Margaret A. E. Kelly. 

D 11, Francis M., born 1827. 

D 12. Elizabeth R., born 1829, and 

D 13. Madison A., bora 1835. 

D 10. Amos Lewis, son of Archibald and Nancy Mitchell, was 
born in 1824. In 1854 he married Margaret A. E. Kelly in Marion 
county, Tennessee, by whom he raised five children, viz. : 

E 1. Sarah Ann, born 1856; married Wm. V. Price in 1879. 
They have a son: John Alexander Price, born 1880. 

E 2. Archibald Alexander, born 1858; married Isabella 0. Heis- 
kell, in 1882, in Marion county, Tennessee. 

E 3. Nancy Jane (twin-sister), born 1858. 

E 4. Wm. Joseph, bora 1867. 

E 5. Jas. Henderson, born 1869. 

Issue of Arch. A. Lewis and Isabella 0. Heiskell, viz. : 

F 1. John Heiskell, born 1883; F 2, Irene Taylor, born 1885, etc. 



CORRECTION. 



Charles Lewis, one of the descendants of General Robert Lewis, 
of Gloucester county, Virginia, who married Mary Howell, was an 
uncle instead of a cousin of Colonel Fielding Lewis, who married 
Betty, the sister of General George Washington. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



415 



N DEX 



PAGE. 

ABBOTT, Emma 407 

Adair, Edward Alexander 235 

Adair, John 23.5 

Margaret Matthew 235 

Mildred Thoraaaiu 235 

Narcissa Ann Berry 235 

Virgil Bullantine 235 

Adams, Amelia 346, 347 

Andrew 142 

Charlea 34G 

Christopher 346 

Joel, Rev 346, 347 

Miss 136 

Mr. 195 

Robert, Jr .346, 347 

Robert, Sr., Captain 345, 346 

William 346 

Akin, James M 232 

Alderson, Matilda 119, 122 

Alexander, Amanda 105 

Andrew 395 

Anna 105 

AppoUiue 402 

Charles 395, 401 

Charles M., Colonel 402 

Elizabeth Lea 105 

John 121 

J. M 105 

Laura 105 

Malinda 121 

Mary Rebecca 121 

May .398 

Percy 402 

Robert 121 

Sallie 105 

Thomas 121 

Thomson H 402 

Thomson Hankv 402 

William 120, 121 

William D 402 

William Dixon 105 

Algeo, Mary Enfield 333 

Samuel 333 

William David 333 

Alldread, B. F 232 

Ella 233 

James 233 

John Taliaferro 232 

Robert Lee 2.33 

Sarah E 233 

Seal Silas 233 

Thomas T 233 

Allen, Alfred 78 

Ann 398, 399 

Anna 45 

Cabell 400 

Catharine 398 

David 76, 78 

Francis 398 

Francis W :'.95, 398 

Frank .398 

Frank (1847) .399 

George Madison 398 

John H 78 

Lewis 78 



PAGE. 

Allen, Lorenzo D 78 

Madison 398 

Martha 398 

Mary 398 

Mary E 398 

Richard (1808) 398, 399 

Richard, Jr 398 

Saruh 78 

William 398 

William Andrew .399 

Alley, Mary E 124 

Allison, Annie Lewis 408 

John Gano 408 

Lizzie Price 408 

Norris 317 

William B 408 

Alsop, Miss 341 

Alvares, Miss 196 

Ambrose, George, Dr 185 

George, Rev 162, 184, 185 

Georgiana 162 

Lily Florence 185 

Linny Ann 185 

Matilda 185 

Silas J 185 

UtillaAnn 185 

Willis Leslie 185 

Anderson, Ann 25 

Catharine 366 

Edmund 25, 51 

Henning Webb 3.3 

Henry Temple 3:^ 

Jane 202 

John F 366 

Lewis 202 

Mary M 357 

Orville 367 

Patsy D 367 

Phillip Lewis 33 

Polly 202 

Robert Mandeville 33 

Robert Meriwether, Captain .... 33 

Sarah A. E 349 

Warner Meriwether 33 

William 198, 202 

William, Jr., Dr 324, 325 

William, Sr., Dr 324, 325 

Andrews, Almina 341 

Hattie 283, 284 

Armistead, Mary Ann, Mrs 44 

Armstrong, B. I). 412 

Clinton 247 

Eliza 247 

Emeline 132, las 

Frances Rowland . . 247 

Harriet . . 247 

Henry Clay 247 

James 247 

Miss 263, 266 

Nancy 247 

Paulina Price ... 247 

Sarah 247 

Thomas 247 

William Garland 247 

Winifred 155 



416 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



PAGE. 

Aehbrook, Elizabeth 118, 119 

Atchison, Mary 398 

Atkins, Hester 371, 374 

Atlee, Margaret Evans 3(il 

Aulick, N. B 132 

Anetin, Henry 0., Dr . . 295, 299 

Jesse Lewis ... 299 

Sarah Jane 299 

BACKHOUSE, John W 411 

Mr. 411 

Bacon, Lucy 42, 43 

Rosa 104 

Bagwell, Rachel 260 

Bailey, Bettie 371, 375 

Baker, Ann 298 

Isaac L., Major 81, 97 

J. . . . 365 

Martha 214, 327 

Mary 365 

Stanley 365 

Balch, Alfred 81, 96 

Ball, Fannie Tasker 32 

Mary 15, 16, 25 

Mary F 48 

Mr. 11 

Ballenger, Albert Woodfln 206 

Alexander 207 

Angeline 206 

Edward 198, 205 

Edward, Jr 206, 207 

Elias Benson 207 

Elizabeth 206, 207 

Elizabeth (1829) 207 

Frances 206 

Henry M 207 

Jabez 207 

James 201 

James 205 

Jamts Alexander 206 

James Franklin 206 

Jane Mahala 206 

John James 206 

John Richard 206 

John Simpson 206 

Josephine 206 

Judith Ann 206 

Larkin 206, 207 

Lavinia 206, 207 

Levina 207 

Lewis 206 

Marcus Rowland 207 

Margaret 198, 199 

Margaret 205 

Martha 207 

Mary ... 206 

Mary E 207 

Mary Jane 206 

Nancy Ann 206 

Pleasant 206 

Presley 206 

Rebecca 206 

Rebecca 207 

Rebecca (1831) 207 

Rebecca Elizabeth 206 

Sallie 202 

Susan M 206 

Tabitha 206 

Thomas Wood 201 

William 206 

William 207 

William Henry 206 

Banford, Elizabeth Frances 157 

Frances May 158 

Henry Harris 158 

James C 157 

James Turner 158 



PAGL 

Banford, Leslie 158 

Robert Latham . 158 

Sallie (1840) 157 

Sallie Latham 158 

William (1871) 158 

William H. (1833) 157, 158 

Bankhead, Charles Lewis, Jr 35 

Charles Lewis, Sr 35 

Eliza Garrett 35 

Ellen Bayne 35 

Ellen Blonroe 35 

Geoigiana 35 

John 35 

John, Dr 35 

John Taliaferro 35 

John Warner 35 

Leonora D 35 

Mary Eliza 35 

Mary Warner 35 

Rosalia Stuart 35 

Rosalie 35 

Thomas Mann Randolph 35 

William 35 

Banks, Caroline 401 

David 401 

Elizabeth 71 

Ella 401 

James 401 

John 401 

Maggie Hawkins 401 

Strother 401 

William Paul 401 

Bannon, Elijah O. Captain 133 

Barber, Miss 269 

Barfield, Sarah 100, 103 

Barker, Carrie 367 

Max 367 

Maxwell Sharp 366 

Rufus 316 

Barksdale, Caroline C 299 

Eliza M 298 

Frank Nelson 296 

James Rice 296 

Jesse Lewis 299 

John Taliaferro 298 

Margaret C 298 

Maria 299 

Mary Elizabeth 296 

Mary Jane 296 

Mildred Fry 296 

Nancy Lewis 297 

Nelson 294, 295 

Sarah Lewis 296 

Sarah Taliaferro 295, 297 

Sophia Lewis 295, 298 

Barnes, Mary Jane 129 

William 129 

Barnett, G. W 312 

Barnhill, John 222 

Barrett, Charles 48 

Barron, Letitia 407 

Barton, Joab 190 

Bass, William H 147 

Basset, Anderson 30 

William 30 

Bassett, George W 47 

Bates, Miss 42 

Battaile, Catherine 34 

Baxter, James 174 

Bay, Eli 189 

John 189 

Samuel 189 

Thomas 189 

Uri 189 

William 189 

Baylor. Alexander Gait 49 

Ellen Augustus 49 

Frances Courtenay 49 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



417 



PAGE. 

Baylor, George D., Dr 49 

George R 49 

Georgiana 159 

John Norton 49 

Julia Ann 49 

Louisa Henrietta 49 

Thomas Wilshire 49 

Warner Lewis 49 

Beale, Mr. 11 

Beasley, Jane 129 

Beatie, George Hill 154 

Isaac B 154 

Mary Frances 154 

Thomas Otho 154 

Beatty, James 233 

Beckem, Sarah 101 

Beckley, Jo. M 340 

Beckner, John Taliaferro 161 

Lucian P 161 

Nancy West 161 

Phebe H 161 

Seel Shackleford 161 

William Hickman 161 

William M., Judge 161 

Belcher, Alma Pearle 348 

Archibald 348 

James M 348 

Mary Ethel . . .• 348 

Robert Tliomas 348 

Vera Louisa 348 

Benge, Alfred 71 

Alfred 72 

Anna 71, 73 

Baxter 72 

Beatrice 72 

Charles Martin 72 

David 71 

Ella 72 

Ellen 72 

Fannie 72 

George 71 

Hattie Jane 72 

James (1761) 71 

James M., Captain 73 

Joel 71 

Joel 73 

John 72 

Leia 72 

Martin Lewis 72 

Martin Lewis, Rev. 72 

Mary (1773) 71, 73 

Mary 72 

Mary Adeline 71 

Matilda 72 

Micajalx Lewis 71 

Nancy 71, 73 

Nettie 72 

Obediah 71 

Presley 72 

Rebecca 71 

Richard, Jr 72 

Richard Provine 72 

Richard, Rev. (1769) . . .... 71 

Richard Wallace, Rev. (1852) .... 72 

Sallie 72 

Samuel D 72 

Sarah 71 

Sarah (1777) 71, 73 

Susan 73 

Susannah 71, 74 

Sydney Allen 72 

Tempey 71 

Thomas 72 

Thomas, Jr 71 

Thomas, Sr 66, 70, 71 

William (1765) 71 

William 72 

William Lester 72 

27 



PAGE. 

Bennett, Beulah 335 

Catharine D 163 

Earle 33-> 

Edgar, Jr 335 

Edgar, Sr 33.5 

Guy 335 

James, Jr 162 

James, Sr 162 

Mary C 28;j 

Benning, Augusta Palmira . . . 31, 272-274 

Caroline Matilda 31, 274 

Henrv Lewis, General 30, 273 

Pleasknt 31 boon 30, 273 

Richard E<lwin 31, 274 

Sarah Amanda 30, 27S 

Benton, David 196 

Delford, Dr 195, 19e 

Prudence 19& 

Thomas 196 

Bernard, Sallie 34 

Berry, Ange 174 

Ann 377 

Major 67 

Best, Amanda F 178, 18a 

Betts, Mary 100, 103 

Beverly, Roberta 35 

Bibb, Amanda 69 

Benjamin F 6& 

Caladonia M 67 

Jackson 69 

James 69 

Lemira A 67 

Lucy 69 

Marv . . . 44 

Mary (1824) .' .' .' .' .' .' .' ." ." .' .' 66*, 67 

Myra '. 69 

Nimrod G& 

Thomas . 66, 67, 69 

Thomas H 69 

Biggers, Charles Boyken 348 

F. D 348 

Lillian Livingstone 34S 

R. Louisa 348 

Bigham, Miss 103 

Billingslea, Miss • 406 

Bishop, Frances 20O 

William 199 

Black, G. Dickerson 3.53 

Blackburn, Addie .... 133 

Cyrus \32 

Blackstock, Ernest 317 

Joseph, Jr 317 

Josei)h, Sr., Dr 317 

Sophia 317 

Blaikie, John 154 

Margaret Louisa 154 

Blair. Appoline, Mrs 395 

Frank 395 

James L 402 

Percy 402 

Preston 402 

Thomas 269 

Blake, Maria 209 

Blanton, Batey 280 

Catharine 362, 365, 366 

George Washington 280 

Jonathan Batey 280 

Martha 261, 283 

William Hackett 280 

Blaydes, Lucy 132, 13:3 

Bledsoe, Addie 407 

David 138 

Hiram 138, 139 

Joseph 136, 138 

Thomas 138 

Blevins, Mrs. 220, 222 

Bliss. Colonel 377 

Blitch, Lola 312 



418 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY, 



PAGE. 

Boatright, Florence 311 

Hattie 262 

Bobo, Ellen Elizabeth 390 

Bogges, Albert G 157 

Mary Frances 157 

Samuel Spiers 157 

Willis Henry 157 

Bolles, Mrs. 217 

Boiling, Mr. 178 

Bondurant, Matilda 141 

Bosque, Miss 96 

BoBtick, John 151, 155 

John Lewis 155 

Bosworth, Sarah Jane 331 

Botts, Thomas, Mrs. General 46 

Bowcock, Ann Edgar 298 

Anna Virginia 298 

Bessie Bell 297 

Branch 298 

Charles S., Dr 298 

Charles W 298 

Eliza Catharine 298 

Ida 298 

James Matthew, Dr 298 

Jane Mildred 298 

Jesse licwis 298 

John Overton 298 

John T 295, 297 

Lillie 297 

May Willie 298 

Sarah Ann 298 

Sarah Mildred 298 

Stewart 298 

William Henry 297 

Willie M 298 

Bowden, John S 269 

Bowen, Doctor 32 

Jonathan J 267, 269 

Joseph 320, 324 

Joshua Thomas 269 

Lucy Lewis 32, 34 

Mary F 324 

Nancy Didaraa 269 

Kobert Mottram 32 

Bowling, Elizabeth 369 

Julia 370 

Samuel 370 

Bowman, John 184 

Margaret 184 

Miss 184 

Thomas 184 

Bowyer, John 11 

Susan 11 

William 6 

Boxley, Benjamin M 72 

William D 72 

Boyd, William B 312 

Boyer Mr. 395 

Bradley, Jones 259 

Mr. 12 

William 73 

Branch, Maggie M 298 

Breeding, Lucy 232 

Brem, Mamie Louise 316 

William 316 

William Thomas 316 

Brenham, Elizabeth 383 

James 381, 383 

Bridges, Mrs. 184 

Brittain, Attilla Delila 317 

Benjamin 317 

Carl 317 

Emma Eugenia 317 

Eugenia 317 

James 317 

Laura H 317 

Morning 317 

Mr. 260 



PAGE. 

Brittain, Pearl 317 

Philip, Jr 317 

Philip, Sr., General 315-317 

BebeccaT 317 

Sophia 317 

Stanhope 317 

William Gaston 317 

Brockett, Burnetta 393 

Bronaugh, Betsy 177, 178 

Polly 172, 176 

Sarah 172, 17:5 

Brooke, Courtenay Warner 48 

Doctor 48 

Elizabeth 48 

Mary Lewis 48, 50 

Brooks, Alfred Cicero 263 

Alonzo 263 

Berrien 26.> 

Elizabeth Sloan 254 

George 410 

Iverson L., Rev 410 

James Moses 263 

John L 410 

Jonathan 410 

Mary Elizabeth 263 

Sarah 263, 266 

Thomas 264 • 

Thomas 410 

William L 410 

Brown, A. E 150 

Albert 116 

Ann 116 

Caledonia 114, 116 

Cordelia IIG 

Cynthia A 152, 150 

George R 205 

Hamilton 116 

Harriet 195 

James R., Colonel 205 

Jefferson, Judge 400 

John Wood 205 

Joseph E 205 

Lula 116 

Miss 47 

Miss 135 

Miss 150 

Mr. 333 

Orlando 116 

Sallie Rice 205 

Sarah 131, 133 

Sarah 146 

Tempey 71 

Thomas (1835) 116 

Thomas, Dr 114 

Browning, Alice 13;l 

Amanda 133 

Ann 131 

Ann Davis 135 

Ann Lewis 401 

Anna 133 

Bettie 133 

Blaydes 133 

Caleb 131 

Charlie 133 

Charlotte 1;« 

David P 133 

Edna 133 

Edwin 133 

Edwin B 133 

Edwin C 132, 133 

Elizabeth 132 

Elizabeth Brown 135 

Franklin M 132 

Gertrude 133 

Hickman L 132 

James 131 

James 132 

James B. (1811) 132, ia3 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



419 



P^GE. 

Browning, James, Colonel 131, 132 

Jane 133 

Jiiniuie 133 

Lizzie B 133 

Lucinda 132 

Lucinda B. (1803) 132 

Lucy C 133 

Marcus Elliott 135 

Martha J 132, 133 

Mary 131 

Mary A 132 

Mary L 132 

Matilda 132 

Micajah 131, 133 

Milton A., Dr 132 

Milton David 135 

Miranda 133 

Nancy .... 131 

Nancy J. . 132 

OUie 133 

Orville Hickman, Hon 134, 135 

Perry 133 

Sallie 131 

Sallie 132 

Taliaferro 131 

Talitha Ann 133 

Thomas 133 

William 133 

William Perry 132, 133 

Willie 133 

Woodson 133 

Zelindft Field 135 

Bruce, A. M 302 

Mollie 301, 302 

Bryan, Ann 145 

Cornelia A 145 

Elizabeth 131, 172 

Mrs. 263, 265 

Bryant, Anderson VI, 73 

Eliza 73 

Payton 73 

Buchanan, A. H., Dr 112 

Tliomas ....••• 112 

Buckner, Anthony Crockett 364 

B. F., Major 371, 375 

Bettie 365 

Catherine Crockett 364 

Elizahetli 363, 364 

Elizabeth M. (1823) 364 

Elizabeth Martin (1866) 375 

Helen M 365 

James G 365 

James Lewis . . 364 

J. W., Sr 362, 363 

John W., Jr 363, 364 

John Washington 364 

Martha 365 

Mary Allen 364 

Mary Ann (1821) 364 

Mary Ann, Mrs 378 

Maurice M 375 

Overton G 364 

Richard T 364 

William E 364, 365 

Buffington, Mary Ana 266, 269 

Buford, Colonel 1.38 

Helen 138 

Henry 136 

Henry (Woodford county) 137 

John 136, 138 

Napoleon, General 138 

BuUard, Leigh 160 

Bunch, Sarah A 220, 230 

Burgess, John 318 

Burnley, .Vnn Lewis 298 

James H 298 

Jane Barksdale 298 

John Seth 298 



PAGE. 

Burnley, Lizzie Overton 298 

Lucy C 298 

Burns, Martha 259 

Burrows, Elizabeth 246 

Burton, Sady 265 

Willis 75 

Bush, Mr. 398 

Butler, Albert Lea . . 104 

Button 72 

Catherine 33 

Charles E 104 

Charles Lea 104 

Jane 15 

Joel Louis 104 

Martha Love 104 

Miss 33 

Mr. 47 

Mr. 133 

William Lea 104 

Byne, Ann 410 

Edward, Rev 409, 410 

Lewis 410 

Richard 410 

Thomas 410 

Byrd, Addison 50 

Catharine 411 

Charles A 3.56 

Ermina Caroline 356 

Flora . 356 

Francis 410 

Jane Otway 50 

Jesse M 354, 356 

Lanra 3.56 

Louisa Eveline 356 

Mary Willing 50 

Samuel Powell, Dr 48, 50 

William 50 

William Francis 356 

CABELL, Elizabeth 12 

Cairens, Goodson 317 

Cairens, Lela 317 

Lila 317 

Lula 317 

Caldwell, Eliza 134 

Presley 282 

Rosa Caroline 202 

Calhoun, Linsey 350 

Mary 5 

Callaway, Guerdon 335 

Henry Lewis 335 

Orville C .335 

Raymond 335 

Calloway, Jo. W. B 350 

Lydia 131,163, 164 

Camp, A. P 221 

Elias Taliaferro 221 

William Leonidas 221 

Campbell, James Richard 266 

Mary Elizabeth 266 

Moses Sylvanus 266 

Thomas J 263, 266 

Thomas Jefferson, Jr 266 

Cannon, Misi 217 

Cantrell. Albert Sidney 262 

Charles T 262 

Ella Lavinia 262 

Leola 262 

Louisa Jane 262 

Sallie lantha 262 

Stella May 262 

Victoria Carolina 262 

William H 262 

Capps, Anna 133 

Carlin, Rose Anna 318 

Carnes, Mr, — ^ 245 

Carpenter, Abi 865 



420 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



PAGE. 

Carr, Mary 25 

Carson, George 323 

Jason H 323 

Jo)in Moore 323 

Ralph Kennedy 323 

Rebekah W 323 

Sarah M . 323 

Thomas M 323 

Carter, Byram 382 

Carey 32 

Carroll 382 

Catharine P 381, 382 

Celia 348, 350 

Charles 47 

Claiborne 382 

Frank 382 

James 382 

James Anthony 351 

James Lewis 381, 382 

Jeflerson 382 

John 382 

Mary Elizabeth Brenham .... 381, 382 

Mr. 35 

Nancy 381, 382 

Nancy E 384 

Rachel 351 

Richmond 351 

Sarah 382 

Sarah Jane 381, 382 

Stephen 381 

Stephen 382 

Thomas 347, 350 

William 382 

Carthrae, John 7 

Mary A ?,b 

Case, Elizabeth 315, 316 

Cash, Caledonia 113 

Claudius 148 

James E 148 

William 147, 148 

Casson, Sarah 189 

Chambers, Adella Louisa 273 

Charles Augustus 273 

Charles Simpson 267 

Edward Patterson 273 

E. S. B 272, 273 

Giles Madison 273 

Henry Smith 267 

James Thompson 267 

John Richard 267 

Joshua Svlvanus (1839) 267 

Joshua Sylvanus (1866) 267 

Mary Jane 267 

Mildred Anna 273 

Sarali Frances 267 

Thomas 267 

William C 266, 267 

William Lafayette 267 

Chamblee, Elisha Taliaferro 268 

George Lee 263 

James M 263 

John Drayton 263 

Julia Laura 263 

Lucintha 263 

Mary Mildred 263 

William R 263 

Champe, Jane 16 

Chapman, Clara 384 

Chappell, Miss 73 

Cheeks, Miss 71 

Cherry, Fannie Lewis 309 

Mary Lorton 309 

Mrs. 381, 383 

Samuel 309 

William B., Dr 309 

Chew, Larkin 377 

Chewning, America Ellen 342 

Eliza jane 342 



PAGE. 

Chewning, Elizabeth Miller 342 

Fanny Lewis 342 

Hiram Kenton 342 

Susan Ann .... 342 

William H 342 

William Terrell 342 

Childress, Caroline . . .... 381, 382 

Chrisman, Mollie 412 

Christian, Mr. ■ 12 

Claiborne, Anastasia 102 

Charlotte 102 

Duncan Robinson 102 

Henry Laurens ... 102 

James 102 

John 102 

Mary 102 

Mary E. T 81, 85, 86 

Micaj ah Green Lewis 87, 90 

Munroe Jackson Hays 81 

Sarah 102 

Tennessee 91 

Thomas A., Dr 81 

Thomas Burwell, Colonel 102 

Thomas, Colonel 100, 101 

William C.C, Governor . . . 81, 91-96 

William Ferdinand Leigh 81 

Clapp, George W 296 

Clark, Amanda Elizabeth 128 

Bee 367 

Calvin . . 128 

Caroline (18:;4) 128 

Caroline 367 

Churchill 367 

Frances 198, 208 

Joseph 119, 128 

Laura Marie 158 

Mary Lewis 128 

Meriwether Lewis 307 

Nancy Jane 128 

William Luke, Rev 158 

William Mackey 128 

Clarkson, Elizabeth A 299, 300 

Julius 295, 299 

Nancy 214, 294, 295 

Susan . 61, 213 

Clawson, Martha Jane 204, 249 

Clav, Brutus J., Jr 360 

'John Withers 103 

Mr. 197 

Claybrook, Frances Elizabeth 411 

Richard, Rev 411 

William L 411 

Zachary L 411 

Clement, Dora . . 262 

Clements, Early C, Dr 45 

Cloptim, Martha 410 

Coates, Catharine 146 

Coats, Miss 378 

Cobb, Margaret 263, 265 

Robert .30 

Samuel 30 

Coffee, Clayborne Mayes 68 

Elizabeth F 68 

Eustacia 68 

Francis E 68 

Joel F 68 

John C 68 

John E 68 

Joshua D 68, 69 

Mariam 68 

Mary E. 68 

Mary Fielder 68 

Mary Jennings 68 

Minervus 68 

Miriam 68 

Misaniah 68 

Nimrod T 68 

Prudence 31 68 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



421 



PAGE. 

Coffee, Rebecca G 68 

Kichard 68 

Richard N 68 

Richard S 67, 68 

Sarah S t;8 

Thomas J (IS 

William C 68 

Coffey, Ohesley l'J2 

Derrindia 122 

Joel 110, 12J 

Nancy 282, 283 

William 122 

Coleman, Mary Ann 18!) 

Miss 34 

Colling, A..W 266, 268 

Edwin H 182 

Jeremiah 182 

John Pendleton 182 

Mary J 321 

N. D 67 

Sarah 351 

Woods 74 

Colquitt, George D 123 

Combs, Mary ._ 157 

Susan .' . . . 151, 159 

Coudiff, Sarah A 152, 156 

Conklin, Frances A 154 

Conrad, Mr. 47 

Conwav, Mrs. . . • 377 

Nellie 394 

Sarah 378 

Cook, George W 142 

James H 142 

Joseph 348 

Marv 191 

Miss 207 

Sarah 259 

Cooper, Edward Patterson 277 

James Y., Jr 277 

James Y., Sr 272, 277, 278 

Josephine 116 

Lula Jane 277 

Willie 277 

Coppage, Charles F 179 

Charles Lewis 179 

Maria Penelope 179 

Mary Meriwether 179 

Sabina Franklin 179 

Sarah Ellen 179 

Corby, John 106 

Cornwell, Fannie 373 

Cothran, Henry 207 

Coultas, James W 154 

Cowart, Susan 261, 285 

Cox, Harriet R 72 

Coxa, Ann 109 

Miss 47 

Crabb, Colonel 100 

Craven, Caroline Minerva 316 

George 304 

James 304 

Jesse Lewis 304 

John 295, 299 

John Henry 316 

Lewis McKendrie, Dr 316 

Louisa Orilla 316 

Peter Henry .304 

Sophia Mary 316 

Thomas Augustus 316 

Thomas, Rev 315, 316 

William .304 

William Mills 316 

Crawford, Elizabeth 273 

Creekmore, Mary 71 

Crenshaw, Ada 68 

f^'resmon, Charles 384 

Crittenden, Joshua 68 



FAGB. 

Crittenden, Luietella 68 

Puss Coffee 68 

Sarah E 68 

Thomas G 411 

Thomas R 68 

Crockett, Catharine G 363, 364 

Croft, A. B 312 

Annie M 312 

George Richard 312 

Crow, Alvin Benson 269 

Braxton Bragg 269 

Ellison E 266, 268 

John Randolph 268 

Joshua Thomas 268 

Samuel Jefferson 269 

Crutcher, Ambrose 147, 148 

Elizabeth Ann 148 

Elliot Waller 148 

James W 399 

Mary 362, 148 

Obanion 14s 

Rachel 148 

Samuel 147, 148 

Samuel W 148 

Sarah Frances 148 

Crutsinger, Miss 197 

Cruz, Sally 141 

Culbertson, Margaret 173 

Cummins, Curtis 70 

David 69 

David (1830) 69 

David , 70 

David (1833) 70 

David H. (1858) 70 

David Hulliim (1853) 70 

David, Jr. (1819) 70 

Elizabeth (1825) 69 

Elizabeth (1814) 70 

Franklin E 70 

Henry G 69 

Isabella L 70 

Isabella S 70 

James Wofford ■ . . . 70 

John H 70 

John Overten, Jr. (1829) 69 

John Overton, Sr. (1801) 69 

John Overton (1854) 70 

Martha (1839) 69 

Martha E. (1831) 70 

Mary 70 

Miriam (1827) 69 

Miriam L. (1816) 70 

Miriam L. (I860) 70 

Rebecca E 70 

Robert (1843) 69 

Robert L. (1821) 70 

Robert L. (1862) 70 

Robert Lewis (1844) •. . , 70 

Samuel (1806) 69 

Samuel H. (1842) 70 

Samuella R 69 

Sarah A 70 

St. John 69 

Thomas A 70 

Vinson 70 

Waller 70 

William 69 

Cunningham, Jesse 412 

Maggie 142 

William 412 

Willie 412 

Curry, Elizabeth 73 

Leila 408 

Curtis, Mrs. 15 

Custis, Eleanor Parke 47 

Cuthburtson, Anna Eugenia 279 

John 272, 279 



422 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



PAGE. 

DABNEY, James L 45 

Mildred 25, 51 

Dade, Elizabeth W 45 

Francis Huger 45 

Henry Chew, Jr 45 

Henry Chew, Sr 45 

Lee Massey 45 

Lucinda Frances 45, 46 

Robert Fielding 45 

Dallas, Mrs. Commodore 46 

Dalton, lautha 260, 262 

Danee, Susannah Harriet Grizzle .... 390 

Dangerfield, Miss 46 

Daniel, Elizabeth Travers 404 

Ellison A., Jr 182 

Jean Wood 404, 406 

Miss 410 

Walter Raleigh 406 

Daniels, Lucy 61, 338 

Richard 189 

Darby, Sarah 119, 211 

Darden, Lizzie 272, 279 

Darling, William C 332 

Darracott, Cecilia 346, .347 

Davidson, Abner 189 

Anselm L 189 

Catherine 68 

Miss 104 

Polly 338 

Davis, Catharine 378 

Champion T. N., Colonel 308 

Jeff. 377 

Mamie Eliza 110 

Mary Susan 308 

R. T., Dr 146 

Sarah 130 

Deal, Georgiana S24 

Dean, Addison 182 

Fanny 182 

William H 182 

Deavenport, Glover 268 

John 258 

Matthew 258 

William 197 

William B 197 

De Barry, Margaret Ann 281 

Deberson, Patsy 404 

Dement, Bettie 72 

Ella 73 

Emma 73 

James 72 

James Thomas 73 

Jennie 73 

Derlin, Eli 231 

Sydna 231 

Derrick, Adam Jackson 281 

Francis Marion 282 

George Morris 282 

John J 281, 282 

Mary Jane 282 

William Henry 281 

De SauBsure, Daniel, Jr 307 

Daniel, Sr., Dr 307 

Fannie Martin 307 

Marv M 307 

Sallie 307 

Dial, James 260 

Joseph 260 

Dickerson, CO 265 

Gertrude A 269 

Dickey, Ann 410 

Ann D 410 

Elizabeth 410 

Frances L 410 

James 410 

John 261, 283 

Jonathan 410 

Marion 410 



PAGE. 

Dickey, William 410 

Dickinson, Carrie C 237 

Dickson, Elizabeth 212 

Elizabeth 385 

Miss 157 

Robert R 385 

Thomas 264 

William 264 

Dillard, Mr. 44 

Serene J 203, 204, 250 

Dimmock, Charles U 48 

Dixon, Mary 193 

Miss 206 

Dobbins, Sarah 316 

Dodd, Nancy 206 

Donnell, iHabel 109 

John R 109 

Mary 109 

Mr." 109 

Dorsey, Miss 247 

Dougherty, Alice Bell 232 

Brown B 232 

G. W 232 

Jack H 232 

Leona A 232 

William T 232 

Zelpha Ellen 232 

Douthat, Agnes 49, 50 

Anderson 49 

Annie 42 

Bettie 49 

Catherine SO' 

Charles L 42 

Eleanor Lewis 49 

Eliza 49 

Elizabeth A 50 

Fielding 50 

Fielding L 42 

FieldiBg L 49 

Fielding Lewis 49 

Helen P 49 

Henry 42 

Jacqueline Ambler 49 

Jane 49, 60 

John M 50 

Martha 49 

Mary , 42 

Mary M • 49 

Marv Willis 50 

MildVed 49 

Mr. 7 

Peyton 50 

Rebecca 50 

Robert, Jr 49 - 

Robert, Sr 49 

Robert Lewis 42 

Sarah 42 

Susan 42 

Susan Harvie 50 

Warner 42 

Warner Lewis 49 

William H 42 

Dow, Eliza 402 

Dowdy, Estelle 230 

Frank 230 

Hattie 2.30 • 

Henry F 2.30 

Lucille 231 

Mary Olenza 231 

Thomas Earle 2.31 

Downing, Francis, Jr 328 

Francis, Sr 328-330 

Letitia Gardner 328, 330, .331 

Richard 328 

Downman, Ada Matilda 31 

Drake, Margaret 323 

Drummond, Miss 34 

Duck, Eugenia 289 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



423 



PAGE. 

Dudley, Alice 364 

JohnW 3<^ 

Mary ^^^ 

Thomas P ^^ 

Thomas P., Kev 363 364 

William 364 

Duereon, Edwena 341 

Henry 341 

Joe 341 

Mary Ella 341 

Ole 341 

Sue 340 

Thomas ^*J 

William Henry 341 

Duke, Bessie 138 

Caroline J38 

Charlotte 138 

John Lewis J38 

Mary 138 

William 137, 138 

Dunahoo, Sarah A lol 

Duncan, Catharine 308 

glj^a 1^^ 

Garnet't .'.'.' 366, 367 

Georgia 368 

Henry Blanton 367, 368 

James, Captain 197 

Lewis 1?° 

Lucretia 1^^ 

Mary Atkinson ^^° 

Pattie M 368 

Samuel 152, lo6 

Dunkum, Frances 29b 

Dviiilap, Mary IJ* 

Dunn, James ^*"J 

John Robert -"1 

Mary Margaret 201 

Mr.- *09 

Nancy Washington 201 

Thomas Iveraon 409 

Washington 201 

William Lewis 201, 202 

Duralde, Clarissa -JS 

Durrett, Eliza Mavey 299 

Maud 299 

Robert 295, 299 

EARLE, Ann Berry 214, 217, 219 
Aspacio 207 

Eleanor 218, 220 

Elias B 207 

Eliza 218 

Emily Edgeworth 253 

Georgie 218 

Hannah 218 

Henry Montague 253 

Ida .... 207 

John 218 

John Baylis, General 217, 218 

John Hamlin 253 

Joseph 218 

Maria 203, 204 

Mary 218 

Mary Montague 253 

Paul H., Dr 218 

Samuel 218 

Sarah 218 

Washington 217, 237 

William Edward 253 

Early, Miss 299 

Earns, Annie Alice 256 

Archibald Demarquis 256 

H. A 256 

Harriet Rowland 256 

John Daniel 256 

Mary Augusta 256 

Nancy Catharine 256 



PAGE. 

Earns, Thomas Rowland 256 

Eason, Ann Eliza 130 

Ashley 348 

Ashley Wood (1876) 348 

Ashley Wood (1849) 349 

Emeline 12^ 

George L 349 

Heurl 129,130 

Isaac E ^^-^ 

JameiM 348 

Kalera 348 

I'O"!^'* ^ ^^9 

Louisa Jane ^;' 

Martha Overton 349 

Marv 349 

Molani 119, 129 

Ozie 348 

Richmond (1889) 348 

Richmond J. (1857) 349 

Robert C. (1875) 348 

Robert 0. (1861) 349 

Sarah 349 

Sarah Elizabeth 349 

Stephen 349 

Whitmell T. (1839) 348 

Whitmell Thomas (1878) 348 

William S •.„•),■;„ 

W. 0. B =^^' ?!n 

Eastham, George ■ 1«" 

James 1". 1^" 

John 80 

Llewellen 1°X 

Malinda 1°" 

Milton V 8? 

Miriam 66, 81 

Phebe 131. I'^l 

William *■ 

Eaton, John H., Major 81, 96, 97 

Echle, Hannah ■ • 133 

Eddins, Thomas J. D 295, 299 

Edgeworth, S. C, Dr 203, 248 

Edmonson, Sophia 1*° 

Edmundson, John ™ 

Edney, Edmund Randolph 318 

ElizaT 318 

Emma R ^'■° 

Henry 318 

John C 318 

Lewis M ^i| 

M^r\ille Mills,' Dr.' '.'.'.'. '315, 317, 318 

Marville T 318 

Morning S 318 

Rose Ann :^}° 

Sophia A 3|» 

William Mills • • 318 

Edward- , Adeha H' .„, 

James, Hon 218, 233 

Egar, Harriet . • • 1*^ 

Elliott, Addison T i'». '»^ 

Edwin Temple 182 

J- H., Rev 310 

Mary Eliza 1»^ 

Nancy 162 

Priscilla Frances i^^ 

Ellis, Letha J3 

Marg'>retP 112 

Embry, Ab Jl 

Hugh 133 

Jacob • • {•« 

Lizzie !-^^ 

Lula 133 

W. A l\ 

Engleman, Barbara 1^6 

Betsy 1;3 

Christian 1^^ 

Elizabeth ]l^ 

Jacob 173, 175 



424 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



PACK. 

Engleman, James 173 

James W 176 

John 176 

JohnH 173 

Martha 176 

Mary 176 

3Iary Ann 173 

Moriah 176 

Kobeit 173 

Samuel 172, 175 

Sarah E 176 

Simeon 172, 176 

Simeon 173 

Wallace 173 

William 173 

Euperson, Green Craig Miles 247 

John 247 

Joseph Pinckney 247 

JIahala Magdalene 247 

Nancy Caladonia 247 

William Miles 247 

Erwin, Andrew Lewis <^ 354 

Arthur 353 

James Miller 353 

John Terrell 354 

Julia Eveline 354 

Martha Elizabeth 3ft4 

Mary Angeline 353 

Kaucy Walton 354 

Sarah Matilda 354 

William Adolphus 353 

Estes, William 338, 342 

Eubank, Mrs. 362, 369 

Evans, Austin 268 

Belain P., Jr 1.57 

Belain P., Sr 151, 157 

Frances L 157 

Hickman 1.57 

James L 1.57 

John 1.57 

Lucy H 157 

Mary 157 

Miss 11 

JMr. .3.54 

Peter 157 

Kichard 1.57 

William H 157 

FALKNER, Elizabeth 3.39, 341 

Farguson, Mr. 43 

Farley, Elmira 354, 355 

Farmer, Alice 277 

Fauntleroy, Farley 49, 50 

Martha 49 

Miss 25 

Samuel, Dr 411 

Faxon, Charles 179 

Mary 242 

William Henry 180 

Ferguson, C 150 

Miss 188 

Robert 188 

Ferrell. Eugenie .367 

Field, Christopher Irvine, Colonel . . . 366 

Harriet 34 

Patsv 3*i6 

Fielder, Elizabeth (1780) 69 

Elizabeth C 69 

Jack 66 

Joel R 69 

John 66 

Mariam 66 

Nimrod 66 

Sarah 67, 69 

Eielding, Frances 14 

Figuers, Martha 381, 382 

Mary .381, 383 



PACK. 

Finley, Foster G 364 

Jane 381, 382 

Fisher, Katie 336 

Flack, Jane 2.59 

Jane 261, 280, 281 

Fleming, Mary 48 

Mr. 11 

Susan 48, 50 

Fletcher, Margaret 363, 364 

Flournoy, Eliza M , , 142 

Jones H 142 

Martha Markhaiu 142 

Mary Leuora 142 

Napoleon L 142 

Sarah A 142 

Fonda, Christina 132, 133 

Fonville, Mary 119, 128, 129 

Foote, Ann 45 

Catharine Lewis 45 

Emmie 45 

Fielding 45 

George 45 

Gilson 45 

Henry Dade 45 

Huger Lee 45 

H.W., Judge 45, 46 

Mary 46 

Mary Frances 46 

Robert 45 

Sarah 46 

Thomas 45 

William H 45 

Ford, Miss 157 

Mr. 404 

Forsee, E. B., Dr 196 

Foster, Lewis Columbus 282 

Mahala 206 

Mary Elizabeth 282 

Nancy Jane 282 

William L 286 

Fowler, Beanna 268 

Fox, Eliza Lewig 49 

John 48 

John W 48 

Maria 48 

Francisco, George 374 

George Thomas 374 

Mary 374 

Franklin, Magdalene S., Mrs 282 

Freeland, Robert, Captain 43 

Freeman, B. C 268 

Elizabeth 268 

French, Mr. 7 

Frey, James .295, 298 

Frogg, John, Captain 7 

Fry, Ann Elizabeth 297 

Clara Thomas 296 

Edward James 296 

Frank Barksdale 297 

James Frank 295, 296 

Jesse Lewis (1820) 296 

Jesse Lewis (1861) 297 

John Nelson 296 

John Thomas 297 

Mary Catharine 297 

Matthew Henry 296, 304 

Mildred Jane 296 

Thomas Wesley 296 

William Dunkum 296 

Fugate, Wash 195 

Fulielove, Angelica, Jlrs 56 

FuUerton, Jeanie 102 

GAGE, Christopher 275 

James, Dr 275 

John 275 

Mary Jane 272, 275, 276 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



425 



PAUE. 

<3age, Matthew 275 

Naucy 275 

Kobert 275 

Hubert, (Jolonel 275 

Gaines, Frances 218, 237, 238 

Sue 311 

Gaither, James E 366 

Thomas 366 

Galhiher, William 268 

Gait, Ada C 238 

Gamewell, Abbie 307 

John Asberry 307 

Joseph A 307 

Joseph McDowell 307 

Martha E. B 307 

Mary Ann 307 

Mary Lily 307 

Mary W 307 

Minnie 307 

Sarah Ann 307 

Susan A 307 

William Asberry, Rev 307, 308 

•Garner, Eleanor 75 

Mary 75 

N. B 77 

Orange 74 

Garnett, James W 297 

Garrett, Laban J., Jr 159 

Laban J., Sr. . . . 159 

Margaret 341 

Susan Elizabeth 159 

William Henry 159 

Garrison, Andrew Soule 267 

A. T 266, 267 

David Bascomb 267 

Hannah Angeline 267 

Margaret Didama 267 

Martha Virginia 267 

Mary Emeline 267 

Nancy Ann 267 

Sarah Eliza 267 

■Gates, Adeline E 72 

Andrew Valentine 72 

Benjamin Parker 72 

James Martin 72 

James Polk 72 

John 71 

Katie Emeline 72 

Martha Ann 72 

Nancy Jane 72 

Susan Frances 72 

Thomas B 71 

William Kichard 72 

Gatlin, Martha E 282 

Gentry, Albert 116 

Charles 116 

Meredith Poindexter 114-116 

George, Catharine 382 

Nancy 382 

Presley 381, 382 

Gladding, Mr. 167 

Gibson, Hampton 408 

Jean 408 

John 408 

Marion Elizabeth 408 

Preston 408 

Rachel 377 

Robert 408 

Giddings, Rachel D 152, 156 

•Gilbert, Harriet Emma 320 

Isham 173 

Iverson .320 

James (1855) 320 

James B 320 

Joseph H 206 

Martha Ann 173 

Mary 175 

Miss 339 



PAOE. 

Gilbert, Sarah C 173 

W. R 206 

Gill, Henry 269 

James 269 

Mamie 269 

Mattie 269 

Mrs. 266, 269 

Gilliland, John 184 

Mary Elizabeth 184 

William 184 

Gilmer, Thomas M 7 

Gilmore, Alexander 180 

Ellen 180 

George 177, 180 

James 268 

James Lewis 180 

Joel 180 

John 269 

John Wilson 180 

Mary 180 

Robert 18U 

Thomas Elliott 180 

Girdly, Matthew 413 

Gist, Louisa 275 

Givens, Elizabeth 6, 11 

Goddy, Mary Jane 208 

Golightly, David 203 

David 208 

Golden, Amanda Malvina 221 

Hannah Harrison 221 

Jane Adeline 222 

John, Rev 220, 221 

John Taliaferro 222 

Samuel Asberry 222 

Sarah Cornelia 222 

Sue Earle 222 

Thomas William 222 

Gooch, James Elijah 121 

J. M 120, 121 

Joseph Franklin 121 

Julia Ann 121 

Leah Rebecca 121 

Mary Jane 121 

Thomas Jefterson 121 

William Daniel 121 

William, Mrs 14, 48 

Goodbread, Nancy 315, 319 

Goode, Edward 246, 247 

Edward S. (1841) 247 

Eliza 247 

Elizabeth Hopson 246, 247 

Frances Cornelia 247 

Frances M 247 

Garland Dickerson 240, 247 

Garland T 247 

James M 247 

John C 247 

Margaret Ann 247 

Margaret E 247 

Martha J 247 

Mary L 247 

Mildred Rowland 246, 247 

Minerva 247 

Nancy Poindexter ....... 246, 247 

Oliver W 247 

Richard Thomas 246, 247 

Sarah A 247 

Sarah Jane 247 

Sarah Stephens 247 

Taliaferro Lewis 246 

Tliomas Taliaferro 247 

Wallis Peter 247 

Goodman, Elizabeth 296 

James D 297 

Mary Mildred 297 

Goodwin, Ada 321 

Caroline 320 

Elisha Mills 121 



426 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



PAGE. 

Goodwin, FranceB(1842) 321 

Frances 338, 342 

George Alexander 121 

H. W 120 

John 321 

Joseph 320 

Martin 121 

Mary 121 

Mary Ann 321 

Bobert Emmett 321 

Rob 121 

Thomas 320 

William 120, 121 

William (1834) 321 

Gordon, Alexander 346, 347 

Mrs. 61, 338 

Graham, Ann Berry 235 

Benjamin Calhoun 235 

Elmina 320 

Emma 322 

Ezekiel 218, 283-285 

Frances (1813) 322 

Frances V. (1853) 322 

James H 322 

JaneM 321 

John Lewis 235 

John Lewis (1812) 235 

Joseph Alexander 235 

Joseph F 322 

Lewis Earle 235 

Liila 322 

Margaret 322 

Margaret Clarkson 235 

Margaret Florence 235 

Margaret P 321 

Martha 322 

Martha Gibson 235 

Martha 322 

Mary 321 

Mary Caroline 255 

Mary Octavia 236 

Mildi-ed 235 

Richard Addison 235 

Robert 322 

Robert Leonidas 255 

Samuel Parkhill 235 

Sarah 322 

Sarah (1815) 322 

Sarah (1852) 322 

Sarah Ann Thomasin 235 

Tliomas (1857) 322 

Thomas B 321 

Watty 321 

William 322 

William A 254 

William Alexander 235 

William, Jr 320 

William Lewis 321 

William M 322 

William Madison 235 

W, P., Dr 410 

William Robert 322 

Grant, J. M 46 

Graves, B., General 410 

Frances L 410 

Iverson L 410 

JohnD 410 

Sidney 410 

Solomon, Jr 410 

Solomon, Sr 410 

William B 410 

Gray, Edmund L 74 

George 71, 73 

George L 73 

Jessie Lee 74 

Lemira 74 

Martha 74 

Martha Elizabeth 74 



Page. 

Gray, Miss — 45- 

Obadiab 73 

Obadiah ■ 74 

Quinn 74 

Bichard II ';4 

Sarah 74 

Sarah Ann 74 

Susan 74 

Terrell 73, 74 

Green, Cornelia 68 

Hannah 31 

Mr.. 357 

Gregory, Mildred 16 

Penelope 130 

Boger 15 

Griffin, Caroline 357 

Chisolm 346, 357 

Doctor 50 

George 357 

James 357 

Lorain 357 

Martha 357 

Mary 218, 230 

Mary Ann 357 

Nancy 357 

Sarah 48 

Viney 357 

William L 357 

Griffith, Charles Madison 413 

H. W., Dr 413 

Grimes, Cynthiana 132 

Elizabeth 159 

James 132 

Grubb, John A 123 

Susan Ann 123 

Grymes, Harriet 151, 155 

John R 96 

Guflfy, Mr. 259 

Guinis, Sallie E 232 

Guthrie, Ann E 149, 150 

Gwathney, Frances Lewis, Mrs 47 

HACKETT, Joel Lewis 347 
Mrs. 217 

Bobert 346, 347 

Hagwood, Martin, Jr 209 

Martin, Sr 209 

Haley, Angelina 163 

Barflett 163 

Benjamin 162 

Elizabeth 162 

Frances 339, 342 

Frank 163 

James 162 

James 163 

John - 163 

Joseph 162 

Lewis C 162 

Lncinda 163 

Mary 163 

Mary Frances 162 

Nancy J 162 

Nancy L 184, 185 

Nancy Lewis 162 

Nancy L., Mrs 184 

Newton 163 

Paulina 163 

Paulina C 162 

Paulina T 162 

Pauline 184, 185 

William 163 

Willis 162 

Woodson 162 

Hall, Elizabeth 151 

Jacob 132 

James 150 

Jane 72. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



427 



PAGE. 

Hall, Mr. 1]« 

Hamilton, MiBS * : i „ 

Hamlin, Mrs. |50, 251 

Hampton, Nancy '=»<*, /»4 

Hancock, Miss ^^^ 

Haney, Mary Ann f45 

Hanley, Mr. • • 190 

Hannon, Winifred 187, 193 

Hansboro, Elija >581, 6b^ 

Hanson, Caroline F 1^^ 

Carrie Louisa 17^ 

Charles S., Colonel 1''^ 

Charles T 1^^ 

Eliza Ann • • lo^ 

Ellen Lucretia IbT, ibs 

Isaac S 17^ 

Jennie M 166 

LydiaC 166 

MaryK 167 

Matilda R 16° 

K. H., Jr 166 

Richard Hickman, Sr Wy 

Roger Weightman, General . . . 168, lt>.t 

Samuel 16G 

Samuel, Hon 164, 166, 167 

Samuel K., Jr 17'^ 

Sarah C 1™ 

Thomas L l'^7 

Hardin, Austin Moore ^''J 

Benjamin Lewis jf '1 

Dougherty Virginia 207 

Isaac B \\l 

John Allen "^67 

Nancy Jane 267 

Robert Didama 267 

Thomas Bascomb 267 

William Ferdinand HI 

WilU-'-J 267 

William Jackson ^°' 

Hargrove, Amanda -^^ 

Lawson P 354, 356 

Nancy ^^6 

Harper, Miss '°-* 

Mr. '^^^ 

Harris, Augustus ^1^ 

Benjamin V.;t 

Eliza 149 

James D., Rev *\^ 

Lucy F 149 

Sarah 3«2 

Temple ff^ 

Washington i^^' 

William McN., Rev 381, 382 

Harrison, Anna }2 

Mary 263, 264 

Miriam 1"^ 

Thomas ^|^ 

William Knox j]° 

Hart, Banks 401 

Hawkins 401 

John 401 

Mrs. Doctor 56, 57 

Hartgrove, .\nna 1^4 

Hartsock, J. E 154 

Harvie, John, Colonel ^^^ 

Harwood, Agnes 48, 49 

Nancy 48 

Haslip, Andrew "5 

Haston, Annie Belle 285 

F. F 283, 285 

Freddie Jay 285 

Hawbusson, Alexander 323 

Hawkins, -Alexander Stephens 212 

Augustus ... 393 

Caleb • • o 

Claiborne . . • 212 

Ethalinda 401 

Gabriella *'^1 



PAGE. 

Hawkins, Henry 212 

James 385 

James, Rev 211 

John 393 

John 401 

John L 212 

John, Rev 211 

J. Strother, Jr 401 

Julia 212 

Lafayette 212 

Lewis >'";5 

Llewellyn 393 

Llewellyn fOl 

Margaret 385 

Margaret 393 

Margaretta 401 

Martha 212 

Martha V 212 

Mary Maria 385 

Miriam 400, 401 

Musadora 385 

Peter 199, 211 

Rebecca 211 

Robert Z., Judge 381, 384 

Samuel 393 

Strother J 393, 395, 400 

William 211 

Wood 393 

Hayden, Elizabeth 157 

Haynes, Elizabeth 141 

Headley, Charlton 132 

James B 132 

John 132 

JohnM 132 

Julia P 132 

Hearing. Ada 226 

Hearn, Thomas 350 

Heath, Blanche 278 

George Lawson 278 

James 272, 278 

James Edward 278 

John Dossey 278 

Hedrick, Benjamin 280 

Louisa Elizabeth 280 

Sarah Minerva Caroline 280 

Heiskell, Alexander St. Cyr, Major . 295, .302 

Emma Eleanor 304 

Erasmus 168 

Isabella 414 

James 304 

James Alexander 304 

Jesse Lewis 302-304 

Mary Ann Lewis . 304 

Mary Hester 304 

Mary Josephine 304 

Peter Henry, Jr. (1856) 304 

Peter Henry, Sr., Dr 304 

Sarah Lewis 304 

Sarah Taliaferro 296, 304 

Susan Ann 304 

Helm, Charles W., Major .... 167, 168 

Inda 366 

James ^"J 

James P 366 

James Stone 16° 

gj^tg 366 

Kennedy 366 

Matilda Stone 168 

Mr. 382 

Roger Hanson :J^^ 

VirgieA 168 

Hemphill, Anna f'^^ 

Rachel 259 

Ruth 259 

Henderson, John ^f^ 

John T., Rev 158 

Mary 269 

Willis 26» 



428 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



PAGE. 

Henry, Boverly Allen, Jr 310 

Beverly Allen, Sr., I)r .310 

Charlotte 317 

Emeline ^11 

Lucy 310 

MisB 411 

Mrs. 266, 267 

Overton Lewis 310 

Pat 317 

Sophia 317 

Susannah 393, 395 

William, Jr 317 

William, Sr 317 

Herbert, Robert 70 

Herndon, Mary B 66, 101, 110 

Herring, Edward Herington 243 

Racliel Elizabeth 243 

Simon Bright 243 

Susan Amanda 281 

Heyser, Charles F 335 

Hickman, Adelia 138 

AHeline 178 

Adeline Demarquis 178, 182 

Agues 136, 138 

Albert H 151, 155 

Alice 179 

Amelia 172, 176 

Amelia Frances 179 

Ann (1805) 140 

Ann 146 

Ann 156 

Anna (1754) 131, 147 

Anna (1775) 136 

Annie 175 

Betsy 176 

Bettie E 138 

Braxton Lewis 151, 156 

Caroline (180.3) 164, 172 

Caroline!) 138 

Caroline P 137, 138 

Catharine (1797) 164, 166 

Cathai-ine (1832) 174 

Catharine C. (1812) 137 

Charles Douglas 179 

Charles Lewis Grynies 155 

Clara (1807) 140, 142 

Clara 147 

Clara 176 

Cuthbert Henry (1815) 159 

Cuthbert Henry (1851) 159 

David (1749) 131, 136 

David 142 

David 146 

David 148 

David 156 

David Addenbrook 152, 156 

David Clinton 179 

David H. (1823) 137. 138 

David Henry, Hon 144, 145 

David McClanahan, Captain . . 136, 144 

David Wallace 156 

David William 140, 142 

Drucilla 173 

Edward L 137 

Edwin Clinton 178, 182, 183 

Edwin Clinton (1842) 179 

Egbert, Osweld, Captain 163 

Eleanor 131, 161 

Elijah H 173 

Eliza Ann 178 

Eliza Bird 178, 182 

Eliza T 173 

Elizabeth 137 

Elizabeth 146 

Elizabeth (1790) 164, 165 

Elizabeth (1806) 172, 176 

Elizabeth 176 

Elizabeth 182 



PAGE. 

Hickman, Elizabeth B 173, 175 

Elizabeth Frances 178 

Elizabeth Virginia 159 

Ellen Douglas 179 

Elliott 156 

Emily Temple 151, 155 

Fannie Bell 150 

Fanny Lawson 151, 161 

Fielding Alexander 159, IfiO 

Frances Garetta 178, 182 

Frances Levinia 160 

Francis 381, ,382 

Frank 151 

Gholson 176 

Gholson S 173 

Hannah 131, 183, 184 

Hannah, Mrs 401 

Henry 156 

Henry 176 

Heury, Rev 131, 151 

Henry Terrell 172, 175 

Hester Ann 156 

lanthaC 152, 156 

Irene 147 

Ira 156 

James 61, 131 

James (1760) 131, 172 

James 142 

James (1826) 152 

James 156 

James 175 

James 176 

James 182 

James J 144, 145 

James Lewis (1788) 177, 178 

James Lewis (1828) 178 

James Lewis (1847) 179 

James, Lieutenant (1784) .... 136, 142 

James Logan 159 

James P. (1812) 172, 176 

Jame« Pruett (1814) 140, 142 

Joel (1761) 131, 176, 177 

Joel (1824) 152 

Joel Drake, Lieutenant 183 

Joel F 172, 176 

Joel Franklin (1804) 178, 182 

Joel Thomas, Dr. (1825) 178, 179,330, 331 

Joel Thomas, Jr. (1849) 179 

John 142 

John 175 

John Breckinridge 179 

John Gay 145 

John Hart 152, 156 

John James 179 

John Lewis 1.36 

John Lewis (1777) 136, 164, 165 

John Lewis (1804) 136, 140 

John Lewis (1821) 1.37, 138 

John Lewis 145 

John Llewellen 156 

John Milton 156 

John Thomas 156 

JohnW 176 

JohnW 182 

John Wilson (1787) 177, 178 

Julia L 153 

Laura (1823) 143 

Laura 146 

Laura 148 

Laura 175 

Laurina Eastham 151, 155 

Lawson Bullitt, Dr 159 

Leona Davis 159 

Leslie Combs 159 

Lewis 150 

Llewellen Bloomfield 152, 156 

Llewellen, Captain 164 

Llewellen St. Cyr 164 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



429 



PAGE. 

Hickman, Louisa (1814) 17;^, 17G 

Louisa 176 

Louisa 182 

Louisa Verona 151, 153 

Lucinda 178, 182 

Lucy (1789) 13G, 14G 

Lucy (1778) 151, 167 

Lucy (1827) 173 

Lucy 178 

Lucy Elizabeth 160 

Luther S 175 

Lydia Ann 176 

Lydia E 137 

Marcellus 148, 156 

Margaret (1772) 136 

Margaret (.1819) 137 

Margaret Downing 178 

Margaret S 138 

Maria (1829) 174 

Maria 176 

Maria 178 

Maria 182 

Maria Shackleford 179 

Maria Trotter 178, 179 

Martha 146 

Martha A 176 

Martha A 182. 

Martha Sydna 159 

Martha Wilkinson 179 

Mary 146 

Mary (1780) 151, 158 

Mary (1802) 172, 175 

Mary (1820) 173 

Mary 175 

Marv 176 

Mary 182 

Mary Ann 176 

Mary Ann (1833) 180, 181 

Mary Byrd 151, 155 

Mary Elizabeth 143 

Mary Ellen 159 

Mary K 173 

Mary Letitia 179 

Mary Lewis 178 

Mary Sabina 178 

Matilda 164, 166, 167 

Milton 145, 146 

Nancy (1779) 136, 138 

Nancy 151 

Nancy 156 

Nancy E. (1790) 177 

Nancy Lewis 161 

Nancy Lewis (1800) 172, 174 

Paschal Preble 152, 156 

Paulina Louisa 153 

Polly Terrell 177, 180 

Rebecca 147 

Bobert Best, Captain 183 

Robert L 173 

Rodney 148 

Rodney 156 

Rodney Elbridge 151, 156 

Rosanna Brooking 151. 155 

Richard (1813) 137 

Richard (1795) 151, 159 

Richard, General (1757) . .131, 163, 164 

Richard T 156 

Richard William Lewis (1846) .... 159 
Richard William Lewis, Dr. (1822) 159. 160 

Sally Lawson 177, 180 

Sarah 142 

Sarah 156 

Sarah Ann 145 

Sarah Ann 148 

Sarah Ann (1825) 173 

Sarah Caroline 178, 179 

Sarah Combs 159 

Sarah E 173 



PAGE. 

Hickman, Sarah Frances' 1.59 

Sarah Jane 178 

Sarah Lewis 156 

Sarah Melvina 152, 157 

Sarah Mildred 159 

Sarah V 156 

Sophia W 140, 142 

Susan Frances 152, 156 

Susan Moreah 160 

Susannah 131 

Thaddeus 146 

Thaddeus B 145 

Theodore 156 

Thomas 142 

Thomas B 173 

Thomas, Colonel (1782) 136, 139 

Thomas Elliott 177, 180 

Thomas Harvey 145, 146 

Thomas Jefferson 173 

Warren 156 

William (1792) 136, 146 

William 161 

William 175 

William 178 

William B. (1795) 172, 173 

William Franklin 179 

William H 183 

William Jones 156 

William L. (1790) 151, 160 

William Lewis (1776) 151 

William Shackleford 178 

William Thomas 144, 145 

William Wallace 152, 156 

Hicks, Junius 265 

Leonidas 265 

Myra Leonora 265 

Richard 263, 265 

Romeo 265 

Theodore 265 

Volney 265 

Wellington 265 

Zeno 265 

Hill, Alice Elizabeth 154 

Benjamin F. (18(34) 155 

Benjamin Thomas (1836) 155 

Edward T 186 

Edwin T 162 

Elizabeth (1781) 162 

Elizabeth (1803) 184, 186 

Ellen F 162 

Ellen Frances 185, 186 

Emily Hickman 154 

Emma Eoline 154 

Esther Ann 155 

Freddie Lincoln 155 

George (1797) 184, 185 

George 131, 184 

George L 151, 153 

George Lewis . 154 

Hannah 184, 185 

Hester S. A 304 

James F 162 

James H 186 

James Hickman 185 

James Hickman, Lieut. (1779) . 161, 162 

James Lewis 184, 185 

Jane 210 

John 404 

John Hart 154 

John P 78 

John P 162 

John P. (1790) 184 

Joseph 131, 161 

Joseph Braxton 155 

Lerov Lewis 162 

Leroy Lewis (1801) 184, 185 

Lerov W 162 

Leroy W 186 



430 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAxMILY. 



PAGE. 

Hill, Lewis Samuel 154 

Louisa 185 

Mary Louisa 154 

Minnie May 154 

Miss 411 

M. M . 72 

Nancy 184, 186 

Nancy Lewis 162, 163 

Orniaziuda . , 162 

Ormizinda 186 

Phebe Laurinda 153, 154 

Robert 77 

Robert F 78 

Rodney Perry 155 

Sarah Lewis 154 

Silas P 163, 184, 185 

Susan Hickman 184 

William Lesley 154 

William Morgan 155 

Willis A 162, 186 

Hillard, Ann Eliza 316 

Ben F 117 

Charles Eugene 316 

David, Rev 315 

Howard M 316 

Ida Love 316 

James Henry 316 

James Robert 316 

Margaret Josephine 316 

Mary Jane 316 

S»m. Haywood 316 

Sarah Maria 316 

Sophia Melinda 316 

Walter Lee 316 

William David, Dr 316 

William Lewis, Dr 315 

Hines, Bertie 389 

Bessie 389 

Florence 387 

Isaac Dyer 387, 389 

Laura Rebecca . . 387 

Lewis Moore 387 

Martha Lavinia 387 

Mary 382 

Mary Eliza 387 

Moore 389 

Robert 386 

Robert Lee 387 

Roberta Marks 387 

Tulula 387 

Hinshaw, Jane 71 

Hipkins, Mary 66,81, 100 

Hite, Ann 140 

M 7 

Hiter, Charlie Albert 244 

Chesterfield James 244 

Elizabeth Harriet 244 

Helen Mary 244 

Legrand De Forrest 244 

Mildred Eglantine 244 

William L 242, 244 

William Leonard (1848) 244 

Hobbs, John F 67 

Thomas 67 

Hodge, Ann Lewis 112 

Arthur G 113 

Benjamin Lewis, Colonel .... 113, 114 

George Darden 123 

George Gordon 113 

Hugh McGeehee 113 

Italy Gazelle 123 

James Lewis 112 

James R 123 

John 112 

Joseph 112 

Martha E 112 

Mary B 113 

Mary Euphenia 112 



PAGE. 

Hodge, Robert Thomas 113 

Thomas E 112 

William Isaac 112 

Hodges, Richard 347, 351 

Hogan, Elizabeth 77 

Hogue, Rebecca 272, 274 

Holcombe, Miss 230 

Mr. 217 

HoUaday, Alexander 404 

Ann Eliza 151 

B 341 

Benjamin F 150 

Betsy 150 

Braxton L 147, 148 

Cordelia 151 

Dandridge 132 

David 150 

Eliza Ann 147 

Elizabeth 147, 150 

Elliott 147 

Emily 147, 148 

James 147, 150 

James M 408 

James Minor 408 

James Waller 147, 148 

Jemima (1788) 147, 149 

Jemima Jane 151 

John 150 

John L 404 

John Waller 408 

Joseph (1791) 147, 150 

Joseph 150 

Lewis (1793) 147, 150 

Lewis (1829) 147, 149 

Lewis 150 

Lewis 404 

Louisa Richmond 408 

Margaret Jemima 147, 149 

Maria 150 

Martha Ann 150 

Martlia Jane 147, 148 

Mary 147, 148 

Milton F 150 

Nancy (1823) 147, 148 

Nancy 151, 166 

Owen 147, 149 

Sally 150 

Samuel Wilson 147, 148 

Sarah (1821) 147, 148 

Sarah Frances 150 

Stephen 131, 147 

Stephen 150 

Waller (1797) 147, 151 

Waller 404 

William H 341 

HoUingsworth, Ann Charlotte 208 

Ann Dorothy 209 

Augustus Summerfield 208 

Calista Florence 208 

Jacob Franklin 208 

Kate May 209 

Laura Josephine 209 

Mary Josephine 208 

Thomas 208 

Thomas Lewis 208 

William David .208 

W. P 209 

Holman Ann 77 

Burke 389 

Fanny Lynne 389 

H. C 77 

Leon 389 

Martha 77 

Moore 389 

Moriah 77 

Raney 77 

Robert 77 

Ross .389 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



431 



rAGE. 

Holman, T. P., Dr 389 

Wayne 389 

Holt, Dorothy 69, 70 

Holton, Adeline 182 

Thomas 178, 181 

Hood, William 147 

Hopkins, Anna 401 

Ella 401 

John 401 

John T 401 

Strother 401 

Hord, E 377 

Frank P 371, 375 

Jane 160 

Miss 378 

Howell, Joseph 263, 264, 26(1, 267 

Mary 41 

Mary Mansfield 264 

Miriam Mildred 264 

William Joseph 264 

Hubbard, Miss 236 

Hudson, George Wesley, Dr 268 

JohnF 266, 268 

Martha Jano 268 

William Fletcher 268 

William W 290 

Hughes, Thomas 7 

Humphries, Van B 189 

Hunt, Calvin 206 

Elizabeth Mahala 206 

John Thomas 206 

Martha Ann 206 

William Lewis 206 

Zach. Ballenger 206 

Hunter, Casper C 122 

John LaFayette 122 

Joseph M 122 

Mary M 122 

Miss 72 

Rachel M 242, 243 

Rebecca Ellen 122 

Samuella 67 

Stephen D 122 

Thomas 370 

William 122 

William S 237 

Huston, John 150 

Nancy 150 

Hutchinson, Elizabeth 208 

Hutchison, Benjamin 136 

Clara 136 

David 136 

Eliza 136, 140 

Elizabeth 74 

George 74 

James 136 

John 74 

John 136 

Lewis 136 

Margaret 136 

Mary 136 

Nancy 136 

Thomas 1.36 

William 136 

Hutson, Mrs. ^— — 72 

Hyatt, John 189 

Hyde, Charlotte 69 

Hyder, Adam 264 

Charles 264 

Garrett Sylvanus, Dr 264 

James 264 

John 264 

Mary 264 

Moses 264 

Warner 263, 264 

William 264 



PAGE. 

TNABNET, John, Dr 278 

-•- Innis, Robert, Dr 48 

Irvine, Mary B 12 

Isabel, Mary 117 

Iverson, Sarah 409 

JACKSON, A. W.R 350 

" Elizabeth Gibson 373 

Frank Hord 374 

George Martin 37;i 

Josiah A 371, 373, 374 

Josiah Ashhurst, Jr. (1851) . . . 373, 374 

Blamie Isabella 350 

Mary Susan 373 

Mattie Celeste .350 

Samuel Grant 373 

Sarah Stanley ,373 

James, Flora Ann 269 

Frank Dabney 297 

James M 267, 269 

John 18.» 

John L 297 

John Thomas 297 

Julia 189 

Lewis Washington 269 

Mary Lee 269 

Sarah E 269 

Jay, Gusef Dreadnaught Xerxes .... 285 

Karl Pulfio Cummins 285 

William 285 

Jean, Albritton H. . . 282 

Jefferson, Lucy 41 

Jemison, Phebe 195, 196 

Jennings, Benjamin 70 

Johnson, Ann 341 

Aquilla, Jr 340 

Aquilla, Sr 338, 340 

Atlee 301 

Benjamin .301 

Bettie Lewis 340, 342 

Dennis Washington 210 

Doake Van Buren 210 

Duncan 209 

Edward Austin 210 

Elbert Lafayette 210 

Eliza K 144 

Elizabeth 70 

Elizabeth Lewis 301 

Emily 341 

Fannie 301 

Frances 70 

Frank 70 

Hannibal Latimer 210 

Hilliard Franklin 210 

Isabella Catherine 210 

Jacob 210 

Jacob 341 

James 70 

.James 340 

James Davis 210 

James Richard 301 

Jane 210 

Jane 341 

Jesse Lewis 301 

John 210 

John Akens 210 

John C .340 

John W 70 

Joseph H 341 

Joshua West 209 

Lewis 301 

Lewis 341 

Luretta Maria 210 

Margaret Angeline 210 

Martha 301 



432 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



PAGE. 

Johnson, Martha Caroline 210 

Mary Ann 302 

Mary Evans 301 

Mary Freeman 209, 210 

Mary Jane 340 

Mary Melvina 210 

Marv S .... 301 

Michael 295, 30l 

Miee 136 

Mitchell 210 

Mollie 301 

MoUie N. (1847) 301 

Mr. 138 

Porter 210 

Rebecca Rosalie 210 

Robert 210 

Robert Michael 301 

Russell 210 

Sallie 301 

Sallie 341 

Samuel 70 

Sophia Lewis 301 

Susan Ann 301 

Sylvanus 395 

Thaddeus 341 

Thea Desha Frances 210 

Thomas Alexander 301 

William 338, 341 

William 340 

William Alfonser 210 

William Jones 209, 210 

Jones, Alice 133 

Amanda M 242 

Ann 347, 348 

Ann Eliza 371, 374 

Anna 365 

Anna Gabriella 393 

Augusta Elizabeth 393 

Bettie 133 

Catesby, Commodore 273 

Eliza 364 

Elizabeth 43 

Fauntleroy 133 

Francis, Dr 133 

Gabriel 392 

John 364 

Lelia 133 

Lewis H., Judge 133 

Mary 31 

Mary 133 

Marv 273 

Meriwether 273 

Millard G 317 

Miss 44 

Roger, General 273 

Sally 364 

Seaborn, Colonel 273 

Stella 133 

Strother 393 

Thomas 182 

Walter, General 273 

Washington 189 

William 364 

Willie 133 

Jordan, Gabriel 103 

Jump, Nancy 191 

KAT, Rosa Ann 398 

Keener, Ann Eliza 355, 356 

Kellv. Eleanor 259 

Elisha 259 

George 259 

Gilbert C 154 

Henry 259 

Jacob 259 

John 259 



PAGE. 

Kelly, Margaret A. E 414 

Mary 259 

Miss 259 

Sarah 259 

Sophia 309 

William ,259 

Kemp, Myra 263, 265 

Kennedy, Bettie 160 

Charles Clark 67 

Emily 366, 367 

John F., Dr 67 

Mamie Martin 366 

Martha Campbell 76 

Orville A 367 

Pattie 366 

Sidney A 366 

Thomas S 366 

Thomas Worsley 367 

Kennerly, Sallie J 402 

Kennesley, Jackson 282 

Amauda Viola 282 

Kennon, William 41 

Kenny, Allan 399 

Joe 398, 399 

Mattie 399 

Rosa Mentho 399 

William 399 

Kidwell, Mies 160 

Kiler, Henrietta 184 

Jacob 184 

Kilpatrick. Ermina Rosannah . . . 353, 354 

Kincaid, Charles Euston 157, 158 

Douglas Howard, Dr 158 

Edward Percival 158 

Fannie Lewis 158 

Henry Temple 158 

Mary Emily 158 

Nellie 158 

Susan 158 

William G 157 

King, Benjamin 259 

Elizabeth 259 

Hester 132 

James 100, 101 

James 101 

Jonathan 259 

Joseph 258 

Rachel Mary Elizabeth 101 

Sally 101 

Samuel 258 

Samuel 259 

Sarah E 282 

Thomas 101 

William (1803) 101 

William 101 

Kneeland, Miss 217 

Miss 236 

Knor, Mary 399 

Knox, Anna Isabel 109 

Anna Octavia Lewis 109 

George 109 

Hickman Lewis 109 

Joel 109 

John 109 

John Haywood 109 

Mary Ann 109 

Mary Louisa 109 

Myra 109 

Robert H 109 

Robert Henderson 109 

William 100, 109 

AVilliam 109 

William C. Claiborne 109 

William Hickman 109 

William K 109 

Krlder, Anna Charlotte, Mrs 208 



GENEALOGY OP THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



438 



PAGE. 

LANDINGHAM, Uoratio 129 

Marshall Ney 129 

Mary Ann 129 

William 129 

William Wallace 129 

Lang, Sarah 70 

Langdon, Samuel 199 

Lanham, Bradford 201 

James Oliver 201 

John Richard 201 

Louamma 201 

Martha Frances 201 

Latani, Ann Misula 32 

Ann Susannah 32 

Lucy Robinson 32 

Latham, Laura 157, 158 

Latrobe, John H. B 06 

Lawton, Mary 305, 309 

Lea, Albert 104 

Eliza Augusta 104 

Joel Lewis 104 

Laura 104 

Mary Louisa 104 

Myra 104 

Pryor 104 

Sarah Harper 104 

Walter Scott 104 

William Luke 104 

William W., Sr., Dr 100, 104 

William Wilson, Jr 104 

Ledbetter, Elizabeth 259 

John 259 

Johnson 269 

Richard 259 

Lee, Elisha Smith 120 

Elizabeth 377 

J. L 120 

Jame» Madison 120 

John, Colonel 35 

John Francis 120 

Margaret M 120 

Mary Caroline 120 

Mary Elizabeth 120 

Mathias 120 

Miss 42 

Rebecca Clorinda 120 

Rebecca Jane 120 

Sarah 382 

Sarah Louisa 120 

Sophronia Ann 120 

Leftwich, Grandison Greenville 122 

James Wickliflf 122 

Sarah Matilda 122 

Thomas Alexander 122 

Virginia Alice 122 

William Grandison 122 

Leftwick, Miss 101 

Lehmann, Adolphus 399 

Charles Alexander 399 

Frederick Augustus 399 

John 399 

Kate 399 

Lucy 399 

Theodore 399 

Lemmon, R. H., Dr 30O 

Lenoir, Mary 309 

Leonard, Miss 136 

Lester, Miss 217, 236 

Levach, Drucilla 73 

Lewis, Aaron 413 

Abraham 56 

Addison .48, 50 

Addison Murdock, Rev 406 

Agatha (1753) 7 

Agatha 11 

Agatha (1774) 12 

Agatha (1778) 394 

Alexander 12 

28 



PAGE. 

Lewis, Alfred 311, 384, 412 

Alfred B. (1878) 284 

Amauda 117 

Amanda Carolina . 413 

Amaryllis 238 

Amos (1737) . 412 

Amos (1777) 413 

Amos (1824) 414 

Andrew (1757) 7 

Andrew 6, 11, 394 

Andrew, Colonel (1759) li 

Andrew, Colonel (1772) 13 

Andrew, Colonel 393, 394 

Andrew, General (1720) 6, 11 

Andrew Fielding 306, 313 

Andrew Terrell 281 

Andrew W 411 

Ann 409, 410 

Ann Barbara 32 

Ann C. (1798) Ill 

Ann E. Freeland 43 

Ann Eliza 342 

Ann Eliza Monroe (1803) . 381, 384, 385 

Ann Moore Madison 332 

Ann Narcissa 283, 285 

Ann Overton 404 

Ann Susannah 32 

Ann Susannah (1830) 33 

Anna 14, 303, 395, 396 

Anna (1733) 01, 344, 345 

Anna (1744) 66, 75, 76 

Anna (1883) 232 

Anna Octavia 100, 109 

Anne (1728) 6 

Anne (1767) 7 

Anne 12 

Anne (1733) 41 

Anne (1726) 403 

Annie 11, 43, 226 

Annie (1818) 43 

Annie (1742) 412 

Archibald (1786) 413, 414 

Archibald Alexander (1858) 414 

Arthur ■ • 31, 34 

Augustine 46 

Augustus Frazier 209 

Barnard Bee 313 

Baylis .233 

Baylis Earle 238 

Baylis J 205 

Baylis Washington (1806) .... 218, 237 

Baylis Washington (1846) 232 

Baylis Washington Harrison (1840) . 221 

Beach Redding 408 

Benjamin 341 

Benjamin (1744) 404 

Benjamin Franklin 220, 230 

Benjamin Herndon (1791) 110 

Benjamin Herndon (1826) 110 

Benjamin Hugh 117 

Betsy (1793) 413 

Bettie n 

Bettie (1765) 47 

Betty (1732) 404 

Betty Meriwether 34 

Cadwallader (1776) 403 

Cadwallader, Rev. (1811) .... 496, 407 

Calvin 412 

Caroline 48 

Caroline Virginia 413 

Catesby Latani 33 

Catharine 409, 411 

Catherine 32, 45 

Catherine Winston 43 

C. C 2.32 

Celia Boyd 407 

Celia Octavia 212 

Charles 11, 26, 394 



434 



GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



PAGE. 

Lewis, Charles (1772) 7 

Charles (1774) 13 

Charles (1721) 41 

Charlsi (1765) 42 

Charles (1801) 42 

Charles (1760) 47 

Charles, Colonel (1736) 6, 13 

Charles, Colonel 14, 31, 36, 41 

Charles, Dr 12 

Charles Augustine 34 

Charles Augustine Lightfoot . . 31, 34 

Charles C. Jr., (1802) . . . 261, 280, 281 

Charles Cadwallader 407 

Charles Oadwallader, Jr 407 

Charles Crawford (1761) 214, 257, 258, 

261, 305 

Charles Henry 332 

Charles K., Eev 413 

Charles Manoah 283, 284 

CharU'sRufus 262 

Charles W 412 

Charles W., Dr. (1780) 12 

Charlotte (1792) 81, 97 

Charlotte M. (1820) 414 

Christopher 409, 411 

Christopher C. (1851) 232 

Clark, Hon 105-108 

Cleo . . . ; 284 

Clinton Augustus 234 

Cordelia Melissa 281 

Cornelius Norbourn, Captain . . 381, 383 

Crawford Philips 222 

Dangerfield 45, 46 

Daniel Walker 413 

Darthula 100, 109 

David (1746) 66, 78 

David (1820) 100 

David (1763) 198, 199 

David 338, 412 

David, Sr. (1685) 56, 60, 377 

David, Jr. (1726) 61, 198 

David B 335 

David Benjamin (1820) 327, 334 

David C 411 

David Claiborne (1800) 381, 384 

David Golightly 208 

David Jackson (1774) .... 214, 325-327 

David Jackson (1827) 330 

David Judson 284 

David Sloan 313 

Davis 412 

Dorcas 338, 340 

Dorothea 404 

Dorothy Pickenpack 208 

Earle Sloan 2.37 

Eastham (1792) 100 

Eastham (1814) 100 

Edgar C 336 

Edward C. (1868) 2.31 

Edward E 205 

EffieTodd 409 

Eleanor 48, 49, 50 

Eleanor Warner 49 



za(1782) 81, 91, 96 

za (1829) 104 

za(1786) 406 

za Augusta 100. 104 

za Catherine 209 

za Eleanor 315, 317, 318 

za Farrar 114 

za Jane 290 

za Love 306 

za W 3.35 

zabeth, 11,30,32,44,48,73,208,407, 412 

zabeth (1765) 7 

zabeth (1762) 13 

zabeth (1724) 41 

zabeth (1779) 42 



PAGE. 

Lewis, Elizabeth (1782) 42 

Elizabeth (1814; 43 

Elizabeth (1754) 61, 359, 360, 362 

Elizabeth (1740) 66 

Elizabeth (1704) 198, 202 

Elizabeth (1791) . 199 

Elizabeth (1797) ..... 218, 237, 238 

Elizabeth (1800) 259, 2GU 

Elizabeth (1838) 262 

Elizabeth (1791) 295, 300 

Elizabeth, Mrs 377 

Elizabeth Ann Berry 221 

Elizabeth Battaile 34 

Elizabeth Butts 327, 333 

Elizabeth Bunch 333 

Elizabeth Earle 310 

Elizabeth Enfield 334 

Elizabeth U 407 

Elizabeth Louisa 281, 282 

Elizabeth M 12 

Elizabeth R 414 

Elizabeth Travers 406 

Ellen 103 

Ellen Adora 284 

Ellen Caledonia 319 

Ellen Maria 237 

Elodia 104 

Elsy W 211 

Elsy W., Judge (1822) 211 

Elvira Fargusou 43 

Emily W 310 

Emily Warner (1834) 281, 282 

Emma 341 

Emma (1870) 231 

Emma Elford 313 

Enoch 413 

E. Ross 232 

Esther 232, 233 

Eugenia Richmond 409 

Evan 412 

Fannie 44, 222, 238 

Fannie (1796) Ill 

Fannie Mildred 238 

Fanny 338, 342 

Fanny Mitchell 408 

Farley Ill 

Ferdinand 342 

Fielding (1847) 34 

Fielding (1788) 42 

Fielding 48, 49 

Fielding (1809) 414 

Fielding, Colonel .... 15, 16, 43, 393 

Fielding, Jr. (1751) 44 

Flavius Adonigah 283 

Flavius 284 

Florida 104 

Frances 311, 341, 338, 410 

Frances (1769) 7 

Frances (1744) 41 

Frances (1748) 43, 44 

Frances (1824) 208 

Frances Amaryllis 238 

Frances Ann 406, 407 

Frances Downing 179, 330, 331 

Frances Fielding 49 

Frances Maclien (1797) 199, 200 

Frances Maclien (1799) 203, 247 

Frances Parke 47 

Frances Rhodes 214, 314, 320 

Frances Taylor 407 

Francis M 414 

Frank 231 

Frank Waring 32 

Frank Waring, Dr 33 

Franklin Pierce 212 

FredM 232 

Frederick 341 

Frederick B .• 103 



GENEALOaV OF THE LEWIS FAMILY. 



435 



PAGE. 

Lewis, Gabriel 44 

Uarland Bacon 43 

Genela Beloiia 381 

Geurge 407 

George (1744) 412, 413 

George Alexander 407 

George Henry Washington 413 

George Russell 260, 261 

George Seaborn 229 

George Thomas 332 

George Walton, Dr 315,318, 319 

George W. (1757) 46 

George Washington (1826) 281 

George Waihington (1827) 413 

George Wythe (1815) 40ii, 407 

Georgia Caroline 221 

Gerard Chesterfield 281 

Green 117 

Hamilton W 211 

Hampton 117 

Hannah (1722) Gl, 131 

Hannah 377 

Hannah (1746) 412 

Hannah Elizabeth 220, 229 

Hannah Green 31 

Hannah Shore 33 

Hannah Young 1)0, 202 

Harriet ill, 341 

Harriet (1824) 212 

Harriet Elizabeth .... 33 

Harriet Elizabeth (18.52) ..... 332 

Harriet Frances 205 

Harriet Jane 413 

Hattie 232 

Heber 104 

Henry B. (1867) 226 

Henry Bascombe (1851) 318 

Henry Graves 214, 314, 320 

Henry Rufus . . 315, 319 

Henry Taliaferro, Rev. . . 220, 222, 229 

Henry Waring Latani 32 

Hickman 100, 105 

Hiram 412 

Howell 25,41, 42, 44 

Howell (1760) 42 

Howell (1771) 47 

Hugh Rodman 408 

Hulda 3.38, 341, 404 

Hulda Fontaine 404 

Ida May 284 

Irene Taylor 414 

Isaac 412 

Isabella 14 

Iverson, Jr 411 

Iverson, Sr., Rev. (1741) 400, 410 

James 48, 50, 338, 341, 381, 412 

James (1726) 41 

James (1768) 42 

James (1810) 230 

James, Captain (1784) 109, 211 

James, Colonel (17.56) . . . . 61, .370, 381 

James Boone 190, 200 

James Buchanan 212 

James Clarkson 311 

James Clifford 334 

James Harvey 327 

James Henderson 414 

James Howell 43 

James M. (1828) 117 

James M 211 

James M. (1817) 414 

James Madison (1853) 285 

James Madison (1810) 315, 318 

James Martin (17.53) 66, 78 

James Martin (1762) . . . . 66, 101, 109 

James Martin (1788) . . . 100, 102, 103 

.Tames Meriwether 32 

James Minor 407, 409 



PAGE. 

Lewis, James Mitchell 408 

James Overton (1822) 305, 309 

James Overton 313 

James Overton, Jr 311 

James T. (1865) 336 

James Taliaferro (1853) 283, 284 

James W. (1815) 211 

James Wilson, Captain (178.5) . . 381, 382 

Jane 25, 43, 51, 273, 412 

Jane (17.55) 7 

Jane (1727) 30 

Jane (1811) 43 

Jane (1787) 294, 205 

Jane Moorman 335 

Jane Rebecca 407 

Jane Terrell (1790) 109 

Janie 226 

Jay Whittenton 283 

Jean 403 

Jean Wood Daniel 400, 407 

Jefferson Davis 319 

Jennie 233 

Jennie (1872) . 231 

Jennie Hall 237 

Jenny 341 

Jesse 412 

Jesse Albemare 237 

Jesse Caleb 238 

Jesse May 232 

Jesse Payne 217, 218, 235, 236 

Jesse P 236 

Jesse Pitman (1763) .... 214, 293, 294 

Jesse Pitman (1850) 335 

Jesse Pitman, Dr. (1818) .... 327, 333 

Jesse T. (1808) 261, 285 

Jesse Taylor ('^1847) 3.33 

Jesse Winfield (1847) 334 

Jo. Berry Earle( 1826) 2,33 

Joanna 410 

Joel 105, 338, 342, 384 

Joel (1730) 61, 338, 340 

Joel (1767) 198, 203, 247 

Joel, Captain (1812) .... 100, 109, 208 

Joel, Colonel (1760) 66, 99, 101 

Joel Jerome 208 

Joel R 104 

John, 14, 25, 30, 32, 44, 48, 342, 384, 

393, 407, 412, 413 

John (1640) 5, 56 

John (1678) 5, 6 

John (1749) C 

John (1720) 41 

John (1747) 43 

John (181.3) 43 

John (1754) 48 

John (1728) 61, 213 

John (1833) 104 

John (1775) 198, 208 

John (1705) 260, 260 

John (n04) 403, 409 

John (1729) .403 

John (1784) 404, 406 

John (1779) 413 

John (1813) 414 

John, Captain (1766) 11, 13 

John, Dr 410 

John, Jr. (1687) 56 

John, Jr., Major (1669) 14 

John, Major 12 

John, Major (1757) .... 214. 216, 219 

John, Sr 14, 47,